Stoney Creek residents concerned about King Street development

News Nov 25, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A proposed four-storey condominium development on King Street East has area neighbours concerned about the expected traffic problems it could create.

The proposed 48-unit development is located at 261 King Street East, west of Green Road. The property, where a single-family dwelling now sits, is right where King Street “curves” before it gets to Grays Road.

“My biggest fear is allowing parking on the curve,” said Paul Martini, who lives in the area.

Stoney Creek Councillor Maria Pearson held a public open house Nov. 10 on the proposal that is being made by JAN Development.

Pearson acknowledged the estimated 12 people who turned out for the meeting at the Stoney Creek Municipal Service Centre, talked about traffic and parking issues. They also said there were no sewers on the property, but Pearson dismissed the idea.

She said years ago the property had been approved by Stoney Creek council for a 12-unit townhouse development, but it was never built. At the time Pearson did support the townhouse proposal.

“(The development) is not unique to the area,” said Pearson.

She said residents should understand that developers are not going to construct a few houses on such large properties these days as they did decades ago because of the provincial government’s Places to Grow plans that include increasing municipalities’ density.

Pearson can point to other large-scale townhouse developments within residential neighbourhoods in her Ward 10 ward that have proved to be successful.

She said the 261 King Street proposal will have underground parking to accommodate all vehicle needs. Car share will be available at the site, and the proposal is located on a transit route, with a bus stop a few blocks away.

Pearson said the development has enough setbacks on the land that will meet city regulations, such as establishing a green landscape environment.

“The owner has had all the required studies done,” said Pearson.

But Martini says even now homeowners along King Street have a difficult time trying to get out of their driveways because of the high traffic volume.

Traffic issues are even more of an issue when people park their vehicles along King Street, he said. The city, he said, should prohibit parking on King Street to avoid damaging vehicles.

Despite the neighbours’ concerns, Martini says the city isn’t listening to residents.

“We all feel like it is a done deal,” he said. “No one in authority cares.”

A report by the city’s planning staff, with appropriate rezoning recommendations, is projected to be ready for the planning committee’s review sometime in early 2017, said Pearson.

Editor’s note: A previous story published in the Stoney Creek News’ Nov. 17 print edition included incorrect information from another proposed development. The Stoney Creek News apologizes for the error and confusion.

Stoney Creek residents concerned about King Street development

News Nov 25, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A proposed four-storey condominium development on King Street East has area neighbours concerned about the expected traffic problems it could create.

The proposed 48-unit development is located at 261 King Street East, west of Green Road. The property, where a single-family dwelling now sits, is right where King Street “curves” before it gets to Grays Road.

“My biggest fear is allowing parking on the curve,” said Paul Martini, who lives in the area.

Stoney Creek Councillor Maria Pearson held a public open house Nov. 10 on the proposal that is being made by JAN Development.

Pearson acknowledged the estimated 12 people who turned out for the meeting at the Stoney Creek Municipal Service Centre, talked about traffic and parking issues. They also said there were no sewers on the property, but Pearson dismissed the idea.

She said years ago the property had been approved by Stoney Creek council for a 12-unit townhouse development, but it was never built. At the time Pearson did support the townhouse proposal.

“(The development) is not unique to the area,” said Pearson.

She said residents should understand that developers are not going to construct a few houses on such large properties these days as they did decades ago because of the provincial government’s Places to Grow plans that include increasing municipalities’ density.

Pearson can point to other large-scale townhouse developments within residential neighbourhoods in her Ward 10 ward that have proved to be successful.

She said the 261 King Street proposal will have underground parking to accommodate all vehicle needs. Car share will be available at the site, and the proposal is located on a transit route, with a bus stop a few blocks away.

Pearson said the development has enough setbacks on the land that will meet city regulations, such as establishing a green landscape environment.

“The owner has had all the required studies done,” said Pearson.

But Martini says even now homeowners along King Street have a difficult time trying to get out of their driveways because of the high traffic volume.

Traffic issues are even more of an issue when people park their vehicles along King Street, he said. The city, he said, should prohibit parking on King Street to avoid damaging vehicles.

Despite the neighbours’ concerns, Martini says the city isn’t listening to residents.

“We all feel like it is a done deal,” he said. “No one in authority cares.”

A report by the city’s planning staff, with appropriate rezoning recommendations, is projected to be ready for the planning committee’s review sometime in early 2017, said Pearson.

Editor’s note: A previous story published in the Stoney Creek News’ Nov. 17 print edition included incorrect information from another proposed development. The Stoney Creek News apologizes for the error and confusion.

Stoney Creek residents concerned about King Street development

News Nov 25, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A proposed four-storey condominium development on King Street East has area neighbours concerned about the expected traffic problems it could create.

The proposed 48-unit development is located at 261 King Street East, west of Green Road. The property, where a single-family dwelling now sits, is right where King Street “curves” before it gets to Grays Road.

“My biggest fear is allowing parking on the curve,” said Paul Martini, who lives in the area.

Stoney Creek Councillor Maria Pearson held a public open house Nov. 10 on the proposal that is being made by JAN Development.

Pearson acknowledged the estimated 12 people who turned out for the meeting at the Stoney Creek Municipal Service Centre, talked about traffic and parking issues. They also said there were no sewers on the property, but Pearson dismissed the idea.

She said years ago the property had been approved by Stoney Creek council for a 12-unit townhouse development, but it was never built. At the time Pearson did support the townhouse proposal.

“(The development) is not unique to the area,” said Pearson.

She said residents should understand that developers are not going to construct a few houses on such large properties these days as they did decades ago because of the provincial government’s Places to Grow plans that include increasing municipalities’ density.

Pearson can point to other large-scale townhouse developments within residential neighbourhoods in her Ward 10 ward that have proved to be successful.

She said the 261 King Street proposal will have underground parking to accommodate all vehicle needs. Car share will be available at the site, and the proposal is located on a transit route, with a bus stop a few blocks away.

Pearson said the development has enough setbacks on the land that will meet city regulations, such as establishing a green landscape environment.

“The owner has had all the required studies done,” said Pearson.

But Martini says even now homeowners along King Street have a difficult time trying to get out of their driveways because of the high traffic volume.

Traffic issues are even more of an issue when people park their vehicles along King Street, he said. The city, he said, should prohibit parking on King Street to avoid damaging vehicles.

Despite the neighbours’ concerns, Martini says the city isn’t listening to residents.

“We all feel like it is a done deal,” he said. “No one in authority cares.”

A report by the city’s planning staff, with appropriate rezoning recommendations, is projected to be ready for the planning committee’s review sometime in early 2017, said Pearson.

Editor’s note: A previous story published in the Stoney Creek News’ Nov. 17 print edition included incorrect information from another proposed development. The Stoney Creek News apologizes for the error and confusion.