Federal Conservative leadership hopeful Michael Chong says Conservative Party isn’t the Republican Party

News Nov 21, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Federal Conservative leadership hopeful Michael Chong sees a lesson in businessman Donald Trump’s victory in the recent United States presidential election that should translate to Canada.

While pundits and other politicians have suggested Trump’s win was due to white anger over a government focused on diversity, immigration and uplifting ethnic people’s lives, Chong says Canadians abhor that kind of racial politics.

“I reject that approach,” he said. “That’s the kind of divisive approach to politics that not only doesn’t work here, it’s wrong. We as Canadians have values of tolerance, decency and fairness. We’re Canadians, we’re not Americans and the Conservative Party of Canada is not the Republican Party.”

His views are even starker when compared to Tory MP Kellie Leitch and her proposal to screen immigrants for “anti-Canadian” values. Chong, the son of a Chinese father and Dutch mother who came to Ontario for better lives, spoke out forcefully against the idea. Canada already examines immigrants and refugees for past crimes, security and terrorism connections, he said.

“It is one of the most robust screening systems in the world,” he said, pointing out during Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s term about three million immigrants were allowed into the country.

He said what Leitch is talking about “is not workable, nor is it feasible. We shouldn’t be playing politics with the immigration file.”

Beyond proposing to screen immigrants for “anti-Canadian values,” Leitch praised Trump’s victory as an example of voters who “threw out the elites.”

Chong, 44, an MP for Wellington-Halton Hills since 2004, was the keynote speaker for the Hamilton chapter of the Macdonald-Cartier Club Nov. 17 at Carmen’s C Hotel.

The former Harper cabinet minister is one of 12 registered candidates for the leadership race scheduled for a vote May 27, 2017. There are also two declared candidates who have yet to register. Chong says he has paid his $100,000 fee and is in the race to stay.

Chong said what he has learned about the rise of Trump, along with the Brexit vote, is a sizable number of people have been “left behind” in this changing global economy.

“We as a government need to do a better job at addressing these very real concerns,” he said.

He is proposing a doubling of the Working Income Tax Benefit to $2.3 billion, and $5 billion increase in the GST, HST credit. “These investments will help low income families and people with minimum wage jobs.”

He will also put in place an environmental plan that will meet Canada’s climate change target of 30 per cent cut in greenhouse gas emissions that would mean escalating taxes on carbon emissions to $130 by 2030 while also cutting federal income taxes by 10 per cent and corporate taxes by 5 per cent.

His idea would also eliminate three of the current five federal income tax brackets, and scrap half the current $22.9 billion on tax breaks.

 By following the British Columbia model, he said, which has the “fastest growing economy” in Canada, he can meet the country’s climate change responsibilities while also jump starting the economy.

And with Trump proposing to pass a significant tax cut, Canada must do the same to prevent a “brain drain” of Canadians from migrating south and losing business investments.

His idea is to implement “the largest tax cut in Canadian history” estimated to be about $18 billion “across the board.”

“If you take a Conservative, free-market approach and you are straight with voters on what you are going to do to use every last cent of these revenues to cut personal income taxes you can grow the economy.”

Chong said the top foreign policy issue for the federal Liberals is to stand firm on the North American Free Trade Agreement deal.

When the Liberals offered to the new United States administration it was willing to renegotiate NAFTA, Chong says that was a mistake.

“When you are playing poker you don’t whip out your cards on the table, you wait for them to make the first move,” he said.

One in five jobs in Ontario depend upon exports to the United States, said Chong. He said if NAFTA was renegotiated it could put such products as softwood lumber and beef and pork products in jeopardy.

“Those jobs are at risk,” he said.

A free trade proponent, Chong backs the Trans-Pacific Partnership with the 11 other Pacific nations. If the United States scuttled the deal, then Canada should try to implement a TPP deal without them. If that can’t be done, then Canada should start negotiating bi-lateral trade agreements, especially with Japan.

“There is a lot of mutual benefits in negotiating a free trade agreement with Japan,” he said. “It would benefit both economies.”

Chong, who lives on a 100-acre farm in Fergus with his family, says his campaign is focusing on creating jobs, a market-based economy, and establishing a workable environmental plan. What he isn’t doing is talking about social conscience issues such as abortion or immigration.

“It’s not an agenda I will be campaigning on,” said Chong.

He says social conservatives, which compose a significant portion of the party, are “welcome,” and can “express their views” through votes in Parliament.

And while he supports free votes, he will not be introducing any pro-life legislation if he becomes leader of the party.

“My government will not introduce nor would I support legislation of abortion,” said Chong. “We need to focus not on divisive social issues, but on a robust economic agenda that will get the economy moving.”

The veteran MP says the Conservative party must become relevant to urban Canadians, especially to young people. The Liberals, in their 2015 election win attracted milliennials to the party and voting booths.

He said the party needs to reach out to all parts of the country, be open and transparent and change its policies on the environment. The party doesn’t have an MP in Atlantic Canada for instance, and it has to reach out to millennials.

“We also have to stay away from divisive social issues,” he said.

The next meeting of the Macdonald-Cartier Club of Hamilton will be held Dec. 8 at Carmen’s C Hotel starting at about 7:30 a.m. Guest speaker will be Tory leadership hopeful Andrew Scheer, MP for Regina-Qu’Appelle, Sask.

 

Federal Conservative leadership hopeful Michael Chong says Conservative Party isn’t the Republican Party

News Nov 21, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Federal Conservative leadership hopeful Michael Chong sees a lesson in businessman Donald Trump’s victory in the recent United States presidential election that should translate to Canada.

While pundits and other politicians have suggested Trump’s win was due to white anger over a government focused on diversity, immigration and uplifting ethnic people’s lives, Chong says Canadians abhor that kind of racial politics.

“I reject that approach,” he said. “That’s the kind of divisive approach to politics that not only doesn’t work here, it’s wrong. We as Canadians have values of tolerance, decency and fairness. We’re Canadians, we’re not Americans and the Conservative Party of Canada is not the Republican Party.”

His views are even starker when compared to Tory MP Kellie Leitch and her proposal to screen immigrants for “anti-Canadian” values. Chong, the son of a Chinese father and Dutch mother who came to Ontario for better lives, spoke out forcefully against the idea. Canada already examines immigrants and refugees for past crimes, security and terrorism connections, he said.

“It is one of the most robust screening systems in the world,” he said, pointing out during Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s term about three million immigrants were allowed into the country.

He said what Leitch is talking about “is not workable, nor is it feasible. We shouldn’t be playing politics with the immigration file.”

Beyond proposing to screen immigrants for “anti-Canadian values,” Leitch praised Trump’s victory as an example of voters who “threw out the elites.”

Chong, 44, an MP for Wellington-Halton Hills since 2004, was the keynote speaker for the Hamilton chapter of the Macdonald-Cartier Club Nov. 17 at Carmen’s C Hotel.

The former Harper cabinet minister is one of 12 registered candidates for the leadership race scheduled for a vote May 27, 2017. There are also two declared candidates who have yet to register. Chong says he has paid his $100,000 fee and is in the race to stay.

Chong said what he has learned about the rise of Trump, along with the Brexit vote, is a sizable number of people have been “left behind” in this changing global economy.

“We as a government need to do a better job at addressing these very real concerns,” he said.

He is proposing a doubling of the Working Income Tax Benefit to $2.3 billion, and $5 billion increase in the GST, HST credit. “These investments will help low income families and people with minimum wage jobs.”

He will also put in place an environmental plan that will meet Canada’s climate change target of 30 per cent cut in greenhouse gas emissions that would mean escalating taxes on carbon emissions to $130 by 2030 while also cutting federal income taxes by 10 per cent and corporate taxes by 5 per cent.

His idea would also eliminate three of the current five federal income tax brackets, and scrap half the current $22.9 billion on tax breaks.

 By following the British Columbia model, he said, which has the “fastest growing economy” in Canada, he can meet the country’s climate change responsibilities while also jump starting the economy.

And with Trump proposing to pass a significant tax cut, Canada must do the same to prevent a “brain drain” of Canadians from migrating south and losing business investments.

His idea is to implement “the largest tax cut in Canadian history” estimated to be about $18 billion “across the board.”

“If you take a Conservative, free-market approach and you are straight with voters on what you are going to do to use every last cent of these revenues to cut personal income taxes you can grow the economy.”

Chong said the top foreign policy issue for the federal Liberals is to stand firm on the North American Free Trade Agreement deal.

When the Liberals offered to the new United States administration it was willing to renegotiate NAFTA, Chong says that was a mistake.

“When you are playing poker you don’t whip out your cards on the table, you wait for them to make the first move,” he said.

One in five jobs in Ontario depend upon exports to the United States, said Chong. He said if NAFTA was renegotiated it could put such products as softwood lumber and beef and pork products in jeopardy.

“Those jobs are at risk,” he said.

A free trade proponent, Chong backs the Trans-Pacific Partnership with the 11 other Pacific nations. If the United States scuttled the deal, then Canada should try to implement a TPP deal without them. If that can’t be done, then Canada should start negotiating bi-lateral trade agreements, especially with Japan.

“There is a lot of mutual benefits in negotiating a free trade agreement with Japan,” he said. “It would benefit both economies.”

Chong, who lives on a 100-acre farm in Fergus with his family, says his campaign is focusing on creating jobs, a market-based economy, and establishing a workable environmental plan. What he isn’t doing is talking about social conscience issues such as abortion or immigration.

“It’s not an agenda I will be campaigning on,” said Chong.

He says social conservatives, which compose a significant portion of the party, are “welcome,” and can “express their views” through votes in Parliament.

And while he supports free votes, he will not be introducing any pro-life legislation if he becomes leader of the party.

“My government will not introduce nor would I support legislation of abortion,” said Chong. “We need to focus not on divisive social issues, but on a robust economic agenda that will get the economy moving.”

The veteran MP says the Conservative party must become relevant to urban Canadians, especially to young people. The Liberals, in their 2015 election win attracted milliennials to the party and voting booths.

He said the party needs to reach out to all parts of the country, be open and transparent and change its policies on the environment. The party doesn’t have an MP in Atlantic Canada for instance, and it has to reach out to millennials.

“We also have to stay away from divisive social issues,” he said.

The next meeting of the Macdonald-Cartier Club of Hamilton will be held Dec. 8 at Carmen’s C Hotel starting at about 7:30 a.m. Guest speaker will be Tory leadership hopeful Andrew Scheer, MP for Regina-Qu’Appelle, Sask.

 

Federal Conservative leadership hopeful Michael Chong says Conservative Party isn’t the Republican Party

News Nov 21, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Federal Conservative leadership hopeful Michael Chong sees a lesson in businessman Donald Trump’s victory in the recent United States presidential election that should translate to Canada.

While pundits and other politicians have suggested Trump’s win was due to white anger over a government focused on diversity, immigration and uplifting ethnic people’s lives, Chong says Canadians abhor that kind of racial politics.

“I reject that approach,” he said. “That’s the kind of divisive approach to politics that not only doesn’t work here, it’s wrong. We as Canadians have values of tolerance, decency and fairness. We’re Canadians, we’re not Americans and the Conservative Party of Canada is not the Republican Party.”

His views are even starker when compared to Tory MP Kellie Leitch and her proposal to screen immigrants for “anti-Canadian” values. Chong, the son of a Chinese father and Dutch mother who came to Ontario for better lives, spoke out forcefully against the idea. Canada already examines immigrants and refugees for past crimes, security and terrorism connections, he said.

“It is one of the most robust screening systems in the world,” he said, pointing out during Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s term about three million immigrants were allowed into the country.

He said what Leitch is talking about “is not workable, nor is it feasible. We shouldn’t be playing politics with the immigration file.”

Beyond proposing to screen immigrants for “anti-Canadian values,” Leitch praised Trump’s victory as an example of voters who “threw out the elites.”

Chong, 44, an MP for Wellington-Halton Hills since 2004, was the keynote speaker for the Hamilton chapter of the Macdonald-Cartier Club Nov. 17 at Carmen’s C Hotel.

The former Harper cabinet minister is one of 12 registered candidates for the leadership race scheduled for a vote May 27, 2017. There are also two declared candidates who have yet to register. Chong says he has paid his $100,000 fee and is in the race to stay.

Chong said what he has learned about the rise of Trump, along with the Brexit vote, is a sizable number of people have been “left behind” in this changing global economy.

“We as a government need to do a better job at addressing these very real concerns,” he said.

He is proposing a doubling of the Working Income Tax Benefit to $2.3 billion, and $5 billion increase in the GST, HST credit. “These investments will help low income families and people with minimum wage jobs.”

He will also put in place an environmental plan that will meet Canada’s climate change target of 30 per cent cut in greenhouse gas emissions that would mean escalating taxes on carbon emissions to $130 by 2030 while also cutting federal income taxes by 10 per cent and corporate taxes by 5 per cent.

His idea would also eliminate three of the current five federal income tax brackets, and scrap half the current $22.9 billion on tax breaks.

 By following the British Columbia model, he said, which has the “fastest growing economy” in Canada, he can meet the country’s climate change responsibilities while also jump starting the economy.

And with Trump proposing to pass a significant tax cut, Canada must do the same to prevent a “brain drain” of Canadians from migrating south and losing business investments.

His idea is to implement “the largest tax cut in Canadian history” estimated to be about $18 billion “across the board.”

“If you take a Conservative, free-market approach and you are straight with voters on what you are going to do to use every last cent of these revenues to cut personal income taxes you can grow the economy.”

Chong said the top foreign policy issue for the federal Liberals is to stand firm on the North American Free Trade Agreement deal.

When the Liberals offered to the new United States administration it was willing to renegotiate NAFTA, Chong says that was a mistake.

“When you are playing poker you don’t whip out your cards on the table, you wait for them to make the first move,” he said.

One in five jobs in Ontario depend upon exports to the United States, said Chong. He said if NAFTA was renegotiated it could put such products as softwood lumber and beef and pork products in jeopardy.

“Those jobs are at risk,” he said.

A free trade proponent, Chong backs the Trans-Pacific Partnership with the 11 other Pacific nations. If the United States scuttled the deal, then Canada should try to implement a TPP deal without them. If that can’t be done, then Canada should start negotiating bi-lateral trade agreements, especially with Japan.

“There is a lot of mutual benefits in negotiating a free trade agreement with Japan,” he said. “It would benefit both economies.”

Chong, who lives on a 100-acre farm in Fergus with his family, says his campaign is focusing on creating jobs, a market-based economy, and establishing a workable environmental plan. What he isn’t doing is talking about social conscience issues such as abortion or immigration.

“It’s not an agenda I will be campaigning on,” said Chong.

He says social conservatives, which compose a significant portion of the party, are “welcome,” and can “express their views” through votes in Parliament.

And while he supports free votes, he will not be introducing any pro-life legislation if he becomes leader of the party.

“My government will not introduce nor would I support legislation of abortion,” said Chong. “We need to focus not on divisive social issues, but on a robust economic agenda that will get the economy moving.”

The veteran MP says the Conservative party must become relevant to urban Canadians, especially to young people. The Liberals, in their 2015 election win attracted milliennials to the party and voting booths.

He said the party needs to reach out to all parts of the country, be open and transparent and change its policies on the environment. The party doesn’t have an MP in Atlantic Canada for instance, and it has to reach out to millennials.

“We also have to stay away from divisive social issues,” he said.

The next meeting of the Macdonald-Cartier Club of Hamilton will be held Dec. 8 at Carmen’s C Hotel starting at about 7:30 a.m. Guest speaker will be Tory leadership hopeful Andrew Scheer, MP for Regina-Qu’Appelle, Sask.