Hamilton politicians consider funding 2017 North American Indigenous Games

News Nov 21, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton will be hosting for the first time ever the North American Indigenous Games next July.

But it will cost taxpayers about $250,000 for Hamilton’s share of the week-long event.

Michael Cvitkovic, general manager of the games, requested from the city $100,000 in funds, plus another $250,000 in in-kind services.  He said the funding will help cover the cost of creating one of two cultural villages in Hamilton.

The games, to be held in Ontario for the first time in the NAIG’s 25-year history and first time outside of Western Canada, will be based in Toronto. It will offer 14 sports using the Pan Am facilities that were built for the successful 2015 games across the Greater Toronto Area.

The games, which were awarded to Toronto in June 2015, will have 5,250 participants from 13 provinces and 13 regions of the United States. The budget is about $10.4 million for the event scheduled for July 16 to 23. The games are held every four years.

The events include golf, rifle shooting, swimming, badminton, volleyball, wrestling, basketball and athletics, as well as canoeing and kayaking in Welland.

Just over 2,000 athletes will be housed at McMaster University, said Cvitkovic. Hamilton will host the soccer action at Ron Joyce Stadium, softball at Turner Park, lacrosse at Harry Howell Arena in Flamborough and 3-D archery at the Hamilton Angling and Hunting Association.

Cvitkovic said McMaster University has already given a break on the cost to use its facilities. As part of his request to the city, Cvitkovic wanted the fees waved to use its recreation facilities.

If Hamilton doesn’t provide the money, Cvitkovic said the games’ organizers will be unable to have its cultural village at McMaster University. The other village will be established at York University.

The village, said Cvitkovic, is projected to host 5,000 people each day to view First Nations, Inuit and Metis performers, offer cultural workshops, and enjoy indigenous food. There will be nightly fireworks and medal presentations, he said.

Members of the audit, finance and administration committee referred the request to the city’s grants application staff for review.

 

Hamilton politicians consider funding 2017 North American Indigenous Games

News Nov 21, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton will be hosting for the first time ever the North American Indigenous Games next July.

But it will cost taxpayers about $250,000 for Hamilton’s share of the week-long event.

Michael Cvitkovic, general manager of the games, requested from the city $100,000 in funds, plus another $250,000 in in-kind services.  He said the funding will help cover the cost of creating one of two cultural villages in Hamilton.

The games, to be held in Ontario for the first time in the NAIG’s 25-year history and first time outside of Western Canada, will be based in Toronto. It will offer 14 sports using the Pan Am facilities that were built for the successful 2015 games across the Greater Toronto Area.

The games, which were awarded to Toronto in June 2015, will have 5,250 participants from 13 provinces and 13 regions of the United States. The budget is about $10.4 million for the event scheduled for July 16 to 23. The games are held every four years.

The events include golf, rifle shooting, swimming, badminton, volleyball, wrestling, basketball and athletics, as well as canoeing and kayaking in Welland.

Just over 2,000 athletes will be housed at McMaster University, said Cvitkovic. Hamilton will host the soccer action at Ron Joyce Stadium, softball at Turner Park, lacrosse at Harry Howell Arena in Flamborough and 3-D archery at the Hamilton Angling and Hunting Association.

Cvitkovic said McMaster University has already given a break on the cost to use its facilities. As part of his request to the city, Cvitkovic wanted the fees waved to use its recreation facilities.

If Hamilton doesn’t provide the money, Cvitkovic said the games’ organizers will be unable to have its cultural village at McMaster University. The other village will be established at York University.

The village, said Cvitkovic, is projected to host 5,000 people each day to view First Nations, Inuit and Metis performers, offer cultural workshops, and enjoy indigenous food. There will be nightly fireworks and medal presentations, he said.

Members of the audit, finance and administration committee referred the request to the city’s grants application staff for review.

 

Hamilton politicians consider funding 2017 North American Indigenous Games

News Nov 21, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton will be hosting for the first time ever the North American Indigenous Games next July.

But it will cost taxpayers about $250,000 for Hamilton’s share of the week-long event.

Michael Cvitkovic, general manager of the games, requested from the city $100,000 in funds, plus another $250,000 in in-kind services.  He said the funding will help cover the cost of creating one of two cultural villages in Hamilton.

The games, to be held in Ontario for the first time in the NAIG’s 25-year history and first time outside of Western Canada, will be based in Toronto. It will offer 14 sports using the Pan Am facilities that were built for the successful 2015 games across the Greater Toronto Area.

The games, which were awarded to Toronto in June 2015, will have 5,250 participants from 13 provinces and 13 regions of the United States. The budget is about $10.4 million for the event scheduled for July 16 to 23. The games are held every four years.

The events include golf, rifle shooting, swimming, badminton, volleyball, wrestling, basketball and athletics, as well as canoeing and kayaking in Welland.

Just over 2,000 athletes will be housed at McMaster University, said Cvitkovic. Hamilton will host the soccer action at Ron Joyce Stadium, softball at Turner Park, lacrosse at Harry Howell Arena in Flamborough and 3-D archery at the Hamilton Angling and Hunting Association.

Cvitkovic said McMaster University has already given a break on the cost to use its facilities. As part of his request to the city, Cvitkovic wanted the fees waved to use its recreation facilities.

If Hamilton doesn’t provide the money, Cvitkovic said the games’ organizers will be unable to have its cultural village at McMaster University. The other village will be established at York University.

The village, said Cvitkovic, is projected to host 5,000 people each day to view First Nations, Inuit and Metis performers, offer cultural workshops, and enjoy indigenous food. There will be nightly fireworks and medal presentations, he said.

Members of the audit, finance and administration committee referred the request to the city’s grants application staff for review.