Tory MPP hopes for better luck on sex-trafficking bill

News Oct 05, 2016 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Laurie Scott is hoping for better success on her second attempt to get Ontario to adopt tougher laws on human sex trafficking.

While her private member’s The Saving The Girl Next Door Act received all-party support back in February, it died on the order table when Premier Kathleen Wynne prorogued the Legislature on Sept. 8.

The Progressive Conservative MPP, who is reintroducing the bill this week, said action is needed because contrary to public perceptions, 90 per cent of sex-trafficking victims are Canadian-born, with an average age of just 14.

If passed, her bill will allow parents of victims 15 and under to get protection orders against traffickers, let victims sue perpetrators and put those convicted of the crime on the Ontario Sex Offender Registry.

It will also create a public-awareness day.

Her party’s critic on women’s issues, Scott said the province also needs to dedicate more resources to fighting sex trafficking, but her bill is a good start, only asking Ontario to match measures in provinces like Manitoba, Alberta and B.C.

She said more public education is a major component of her bill because 60 per cent of victims are from Ontario, often lured on the Internet or by those pretending to care for them. Most are girls, but there are boys as well.

“It’s child abuse,” said Scott, who dropped by the Turner Park public library branch last Friday for a roundtable discussion with police and victim representatives that was closed to the media at the last minute because undercover officers were present.

“Girls, usually, are groomed before into a boyfriend relationship and lured and manipulated and coerced, often quickly addicted to drugs. In a manner of weeks those girls can be snatched from the families and trapped in human sex trafficking.”

Police Chief Eric Girt, who joined the roundtable discussion, said he’ll leave it up to politicians to decide the bill’s fate, but supports “anything that will help us to diminish the impact of human trafficking.”

He said police can already prosecute offenders through a variety of laws and are in more urgent need of extra resources to combat what is a billion-dollar crime industry in the Golden Horseshoe area.

“I don’t think it’s so much legislation as a resource issue, to look at giving us the tools for what we need to do, which is largely having the time to build trust with people looking to get out of that situation,” Girt said.

“The key issues in my view are getting women to a place of safety and also enabling them to testify and to assist us to hold those who are actually conducting the trade accountable,” he said.

“But that requires resources for them, in terms of victim support, in terms of potentially (providing) housing or other issues as they do those things.”

Tory MPP hopes for better luck on sex-trafficking bill

Hamilton police chief says more resources key

News Oct 05, 2016 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Laurie Scott is hoping for better success on her second attempt to get Ontario to adopt tougher laws on human sex trafficking.

While her private member’s The Saving The Girl Next Door Act received all-party support back in February, it died on the order table when Premier Kathleen Wynne prorogued the Legislature on Sept. 8.

The Progressive Conservative MPP, who is reintroducing the bill this week, said action is needed because contrary to public perceptions, 90 per cent of sex-trafficking victims are Canadian-born, with an average age of just 14.

If passed, her bill will allow parents of victims 15 and under to get protection orders against traffickers, let victims sue perpetrators and put those convicted of the crime on the Ontario Sex Offender Registry.

" In a manner of weeks those girls can be snatched from the families and trapped in human sex trafficking.”

It will also create a public-awareness day.

Her party’s critic on women’s issues, Scott said the province also needs to dedicate more resources to fighting sex trafficking, but her bill is a good start, only asking Ontario to match measures in provinces like Manitoba, Alberta and B.C.

She said more public education is a major component of her bill because 60 per cent of victims are from Ontario, often lured on the Internet or by those pretending to care for them. Most are girls, but there are boys as well.

“It’s child abuse,” said Scott, who dropped by the Turner Park public library branch last Friday for a roundtable discussion with police and victim representatives that was closed to the media at the last minute because undercover officers were present.

“Girls, usually, are groomed before into a boyfriend relationship and lured and manipulated and coerced, often quickly addicted to drugs. In a manner of weeks those girls can be snatched from the families and trapped in human sex trafficking.”

Police Chief Eric Girt, who joined the roundtable discussion, said he’ll leave it up to politicians to decide the bill’s fate, but supports “anything that will help us to diminish the impact of human trafficking.”

He said police can already prosecute offenders through a variety of laws and are in more urgent need of extra resources to combat what is a billion-dollar crime industry in the Golden Horseshoe area.

“I don’t think it’s so much legislation as a resource issue, to look at giving us the tools for what we need to do, which is largely having the time to build trust with people looking to get out of that situation,” Girt said.

“The key issues in my view are getting women to a place of safety and also enabling them to testify and to assist us to hold those who are actually conducting the trade accountable,” he said.

“But that requires resources for them, in terms of victim support, in terms of potentially (providing) housing or other issues as they do those things.”

Tory MPP hopes for better luck on sex-trafficking bill

Hamilton police chief says more resources key

News Oct 05, 2016 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Laurie Scott is hoping for better success on her second attempt to get Ontario to adopt tougher laws on human sex trafficking.

While her private member’s The Saving The Girl Next Door Act received all-party support back in February, it died on the order table when Premier Kathleen Wynne prorogued the Legislature on Sept. 8.

The Progressive Conservative MPP, who is reintroducing the bill this week, said action is needed because contrary to public perceptions, 90 per cent of sex-trafficking victims are Canadian-born, with an average age of just 14.

If passed, her bill will allow parents of victims 15 and under to get protection orders against traffickers, let victims sue perpetrators and put those convicted of the crime on the Ontario Sex Offender Registry.

" In a manner of weeks those girls can be snatched from the families and trapped in human sex trafficking.”

It will also create a public-awareness day.

Her party’s critic on women’s issues, Scott said the province also needs to dedicate more resources to fighting sex trafficking, but her bill is a good start, only asking Ontario to match measures in provinces like Manitoba, Alberta and B.C.

She said more public education is a major component of her bill because 60 per cent of victims are from Ontario, often lured on the Internet or by those pretending to care for them. Most are girls, but there are boys as well.

“It’s child abuse,” said Scott, who dropped by the Turner Park public library branch last Friday for a roundtable discussion with police and victim representatives that was closed to the media at the last minute because undercover officers were present.

“Girls, usually, are groomed before into a boyfriend relationship and lured and manipulated and coerced, often quickly addicted to drugs. In a manner of weeks those girls can be snatched from the families and trapped in human sex trafficking.”

Police Chief Eric Girt, who joined the roundtable discussion, said he’ll leave it up to politicians to decide the bill’s fate, but supports “anything that will help us to diminish the impact of human trafficking.”

He said police can already prosecute offenders through a variety of laws and are in more urgent need of extra resources to combat what is a billion-dollar crime industry in the Golden Horseshoe area.

“I don’t think it’s so much legislation as a resource issue, to look at giving us the tools for what we need to do, which is largely having the time to build trust with people looking to get out of that situation,” Girt said.

“The key issues in my view are getting women to a place of safety and also enabling them to testify and to assist us to hold those who are actually conducting the trade accountable,” he said.

“But that requires resources for them, in terms of victim support, in terms of potentially (providing) housing or other issues as they do those things.”