History of Dundas' Parkside school protected by board archives

News Sep 14, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The process for preserving Parkside Secondary School’s historic material and memorabilia began more than two years ago – and resulted in a significant collection of material now stored in the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board archives.

Retired art teacher Paul Reble is taking over the archives, based at Vincent Massey School, after longtime curator John Aikman died in May.

“We have a huge collection of material that came out of Parkside school,” Reble said Monday morning, the first day back for archives volunteer staff. “The collection is quite big.”

Although he didn’t have details about specific items, Reble recalled the Parkside collection includes trophies, student awards, paintings, grad photos and honour roll plaques. Reble said the board’s archives also hold Highland Secondary School’s historic items.

Demolition of Parkside is expected to begin by the end of October. Reble said Aikman would have done a walk-through soon after being informed by the school board the Dundas high school would close.

Aikman assessed items for historic value, then provided a list of material that could not be removed to school administration. He did a second walk through before the school closed to see if he missed anything, and make sure no identified items had been removed.

“John told me – we have to make sure these things don’t walk,” Reble said.

Sandra Kiemele, acting curator of the Dundas Museum & Archives, said museum staff toured Parkside with Aikman and helped note artifacts to be preserved.

“We also exhibited items from Parkside as part of the Parkside-Highland Unity Exhibit,” Kiemele said. “All those artifacts on display were taken back to the Archives by John as they were the property of the HWDSB.”

Reble wasn’t aware of the Dundas Museum’s participation – but the idea came as no surprise.

“John was very complimentary of the Dundas Museum. He’d done other business with them before and encouraged me to view their collection – which I did,” Reble said.

A little over two years ago, Aikman organized a team of more than 12 volunteers – including Reble – who went to Parkside and removed everything of value to the school board based on the former curator’s instructions.

Everything’s now stored at the education archives and heritage centre at Macassa Avenue on the central mountain.

Reble said the archives are on borrowed time – he knows the school board plans to close the Massey building. He expects this is the final year at that location, and up to a year will be required to pack everything up before moving to a new site.

The preferred new location is at Hill Park School, but Reble said nothing has been finalized.

The archives’ entire collection contains over 26,000 items and continues to grow with ongoing school closures in recent years.

Reble said if the administration of Dundas Valley Secondary School – which replaced both Parkside and Highland – wanted to have any of the two school’s artifacts or memorabilia the archives would create a short or long-term loan agreement. Everything would eventually be returned to the archives.

As of Monday afternoon, 17 contractors had picked up the Parkside demolition tender documents from the City of Hamilton – including two Hamilton companies, and one Dundas contractor whose mailing address is within 200 meters of the school.

The City of Hamilton, which purchased the property from the school board in April, plans to eventually place a cemetery on the site. Exactly how much of the site will be used for a cemetery, how much will be added to the adjacent Dundas Driving Park, and whether any space will be leftover to sell for possible home building, won’t be known until after city staff map out the site following demolition. The project is expected to finish by next summer.

The eventual contactor will have to maintain an existing stone structure, planter and flag pole at the fronting Parkside Avenue.

Dundas councillor Arlene VanderBeek wonders if the structure could be incorporated into a possible historical plaque recognizing the property’s history and the school.

History of Dundas' Parkside school protected by board archives

"Huge" collection of material identified for preservation before closure

News Sep 14, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The process for preserving Parkside Secondary School’s historic material and memorabilia began more than two years ago – and resulted in a significant collection of material now stored in the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board archives.

Retired art teacher Paul Reble is taking over the archives, based at Vincent Massey School, after longtime curator John Aikman died in May.

“We have a huge collection of material that came out of Parkside school,” Reble said Monday morning, the first day back for archives volunteer staff. “The collection is quite big.”

Although he didn’t have details about specific items, Reble recalled the Parkside collection includes trophies, student awards, paintings, grad photos and honour roll plaques. Reble said the board’s archives also hold Highland Secondary School’s historic items.

Related Content

Demolition of Parkside is expected to begin by the end of October. Reble said Aikman would have done a walk-through soon after being informed by the school board the Dundas high school would close.

Aikman assessed items for historic value, then provided a list of material that could not be removed to school administration. He did a second walk through before the school closed to see if he missed anything, and make sure no identified items had been removed.

“John told me – we have to make sure these things don’t walk,” Reble said.

Sandra Kiemele, acting curator of the Dundas Museum & Archives, said museum staff toured Parkside with Aikman and helped note artifacts to be preserved.

“We also exhibited items from Parkside as part of the Parkside-Highland Unity Exhibit,” Kiemele said. “All those artifacts on display were taken back to the Archives by John as they were the property of the HWDSB.”

Reble wasn’t aware of the Dundas Museum’s participation – but the idea came as no surprise.

“John was very complimentary of the Dundas Museum. He’d done other business with them before and encouraged me to view their collection – which I did,” Reble said.

A little over two years ago, Aikman organized a team of more than 12 volunteers – including Reble – who went to Parkside and removed everything of value to the school board based on the former curator’s instructions.

Everything’s now stored at the education archives and heritage centre at Macassa Avenue on the central mountain.

Reble said the archives are on borrowed time – he knows the school board plans to close the Massey building. He expects this is the final year at that location, and up to a year will be required to pack everything up before moving to a new site.

The preferred new location is at Hill Park School, but Reble said nothing has been finalized.

The archives’ entire collection contains over 26,000 items and continues to grow with ongoing school closures in recent years.

Reble said if the administration of Dundas Valley Secondary School – which replaced both Parkside and Highland – wanted to have any of the two school’s artifacts or memorabilia the archives would create a short or long-term loan agreement. Everything would eventually be returned to the archives.

As of Monday afternoon, 17 contractors had picked up the Parkside demolition tender documents from the City of Hamilton – including two Hamilton companies, and one Dundas contractor whose mailing address is within 200 meters of the school.

The City of Hamilton, which purchased the property from the school board in April, plans to eventually place a cemetery on the site. Exactly how much of the site will be used for a cemetery, how much will be added to the adjacent Dundas Driving Park, and whether any space will be leftover to sell for possible home building, won’t be known until after city staff map out the site following demolition. The project is expected to finish by next summer.

The eventual contactor will have to maintain an existing stone structure, planter and flag pole at the fronting Parkside Avenue.

Dundas councillor Arlene VanderBeek wonders if the structure could be incorporated into a possible historical plaque recognizing the property’s history and the school.

History of Dundas' Parkside school protected by board archives

"Huge" collection of material identified for preservation before closure

News Sep 14, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

The process for preserving Parkside Secondary School’s historic material and memorabilia began more than two years ago – and resulted in a significant collection of material now stored in the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board archives.

Retired art teacher Paul Reble is taking over the archives, based at Vincent Massey School, after longtime curator John Aikman died in May.

“We have a huge collection of material that came out of Parkside school,” Reble said Monday morning, the first day back for archives volunteer staff. “The collection is quite big.”

Although he didn’t have details about specific items, Reble recalled the Parkside collection includes trophies, student awards, paintings, grad photos and honour roll plaques. Reble said the board’s archives also hold Highland Secondary School’s historic items.

Related Content

Demolition of Parkside is expected to begin by the end of October. Reble said Aikman would have done a walk-through soon after being informed by the school board the Dundas high school would close.

Aikman assessed items for historic value, then provided a list of material that could not be removed to school administration. He did a second walk through before the school closed to see if he missed anything, and make sure no identified items had been removed.

“John told me – we have to make sure these things don’t walk,” Reble said.

Sandra Kiemele, acting curator of the Dundas Museum & Archives, said museum staff toured Parkside with Aikman and helped note artifacts to be preserved.

“We also exhibited items from Parkside as part of the Parkside-Highland Unity Exhibit,” Kiemele said. “All those artifacts on display were taken back to the Archives by John as they were the property of the HWDSB.”

Reble wasn’t aware of the Dundas Museum’s participation – but the idea came as no surprise.

“John was very complimentary of the Dundas Museum. He’d done other business with them before and encouraged me to view their collection – which I did,” Reble said.

A little over two years ago, Aikman organized a team of more than 12 volunteers – including Reble – who went to Parkside and removed everything of value to the school board based on the former curator’s instructions.

Everything’s now stored at the education archives and heritage centre at Macassa Avenue on the central mountain.

Reble said the archives are on borrowed time – he knows the school board plans to close the Massey building. He expects this is the final year at that location, and up to a year will be required to pack everything up before moving to a new site.

The preferred new location is at Hill Park School, but Reble said nothing has been finalized.

The archives’ entire collection contains over 26,000 items and continues to grow with ongoing school closures in recent years.

Reble said if the administration of Dundas Valley Secondary School – which replaced both Parkside and Highland – wanted to have any of the two school’s artifacts or memorabilia the archives would create a short or long-term loan agreement. Everything would eventually be returned to the archives.

As of Monday afternoon, 17 contractors had picked up the Parkside demolition tender documents from the City of Hamilton – including two Hamilton companies, and one Dundas contractor whose mailing address is within 200 meters of the school.

The City of Hamilton, which purchased the property from the school board in April, plans to eventually place a cemetery on the site. Exactly how much of the site will be used for a cemetery, how much will be added to the adjacent Dundas Driving Park, and whether any space will be leftover to sell for possible home building, won’t be known until after city staff map out the site following demolition. The project is expected to finish by next summer.

The eventual contactor will have to maintain an existing stone structure, planter and flag pole at the fronting Parkside Avenue.

Dundas councillor Arlene VanderBeek wonders if the structure could be incorporated into a possible historical plaque recognizing the property’s history and the school.