Dundas York Road development moving forward

News Aug 23, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

After failed attempts to develop 18 townhouse units and 12 semi-detached units, the owner of 231 York Road in Dundas is moving on with an application for six single family homes.

A minor variance application goes to the City of Hamilton’s committee of adjustment on Thursday, September 1, to permit the development of six single family homes on the property.

Recchia Developments appealed two separate times to the Ontario Municipal Board over the past four years. Both decisions established that the property is “located within a well-defined and established single detached residential neighbourhood.”

Both previous applications were found to be overdevelopment of the property that was not in keeping with the surrounding character.

“Needless to say, the (Provincial Policy Statement) encourages intensification but not in an unqualified manner,” OMB board member Steven Stefanko stated in a Jan. 5, 2015 written decision on the second appeal.

Stefanko went on to quote from another OMB decision which states the province’s intensification mandate “is not a license to abandon sound planning principles, or to diminish appropriate land use planning standard in search of more density.”

At the second OMB hearing in November 2014, a lawyer representing Hamilton’s city council presented a proposal for six single family homes at 231 York Rd.

At that time, one of the neighbours who spoke against the proposal of 12 semi-detached units said six single family homes was an idea with some merit.

“We would be happy to discuss the details with the city and the landowner should the landowner wish to pursue that option in the future,” said Tracy Rivers.

Planning staff did not respond to the 2011 application to permit an 18-unit townhouse development. The lack of decision was appealed to the OMB by the applicant.

The OMB hearing officer found the proposal was not compatible with the single-family home planned function of the surrounding neighbourhood. The board member stated the proposed development “offends” the character of the neighbourhood.

The landowner came back to the city with a proposal for 12 semi-detached units on the site – and received support from planning staff.

But city councillors on the planning committee rejected the staff recommendation by a vote of five to four, in April 2014.

Former city councillor Brad Clark was one of the votes against the second application. Clark argued supporting 12 semi-detached units would ignore the original OMB decision – which clearly stated the neighbourhood has a single family home planned function.

The applicant appealed that denial to the OMB, and lost a second time.

Dundas York Road development moving forward

Two bigger proposals denied by Ontario Municipal Board

News Aug 23, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

After failed attempts to develop 18 townhouse units and 12 semi-detached units, the owner of 231 York Road in Dundas is moving on with an application for six single family homes.

A minor variance application goes to the City of Hamilton’s committee of adjustment on Thursday, September 1, to permit the development of six single family homes on the property.

Recchia Developments appealed two separate times to the Ontario Municipal Board over the past four years. Both decisions established that the property is “located within a well-defined and established single detached residential neighbourhood.”

Both previous applications were found to be overdevelopment of the property that was not in keeping with the surrounding character.

“Needless to say, the (Provincial Policy Statement) encourages intensification but not in an unqualified manner,” OMB board member Steven Stefanko stated in a Jan. 5, 2015 written decision on the second appeal.

Stefanko went on to quote from another OMB decision which states the province’s intensification mandate “is not a license to abandon sound planning principles, or to diminish appropriate land use planning standard in search of more density.”

At the second OMB hearing in November 2014, a lawyer representing Hamilton’s city council presented a proposal for six single family homes at 231 York Rd.

At that time, one of the neighbours who spoke against the proposal of 12 semi-detached units said six single family homes was an idea with some merit.

“We would be happy to discuss the details with the city and the landowner should the landowner wish to pursue that option in the future,” said Tracy Rivers.

Planning staff did not respond to the 2011 application to permit an 18-unit townhouse development. The lack of decision was appealed to the OMB by the applicant.

The OMB hearing officer found the proposal was not compatible with the single-family home planned function of the surrounding neighbourhood. The board member stated the proposed development “offends” the character of the neighbourhood.

The landowner came back to the city with a proposal for 12 semi-detached units on the site – and received support from planning staff.

But city councillors on the planning committee rejected the staff recommendation by a vote of five to four, in April 2014.

Former city councillor Brad Clark was one of the votes against the second application. Clark argued supporting 12 semi-detached units would ignore the original OMB decision – which clearly stated the neighbourhood has a single family home planned function.

The applicant appealed that denial to the OMB, and lost a second time.

Dundas York Road development moving forward

Two bigger proposals denied by Ontario Municipal Board

News Aug 23, 2016 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

After failed attempts to develop 18 townhouse units and 12 semi-detached units, the owner of 231 York Road in Dundas is moving on with an application for six single family homes.

A minor variance application goes to the City of Hamilton’s committee of adjustment on Thursday, September 1, to permit the development of six single family homes on the property.

Recchia Developments appealed two separate times to the Ontario Municipal Board over the past four years. Both decisions established that the property is “located within a well-defined and established single detached residential neighbourhood.”

Both previous applications were found to be overdevelopment of the property that was not in keeping with the surrounding character.

“Needless to say, the (Provincial Policy Statement) encourages intensification but not in an unqualified manner,” OMB board member Steven Stefanko stated in a Jan. 5, 2015 written decision on the second appeal.

Stefanko went on to quote from another OMB decision which states the province’s intensification mandate “is not a license to abandon sound planning principles, or to diminish appropriate land use planning standard in search of more density.”

At the second OMB hearing in November 2014, a lawyer representing Hamilton’s city council presented a proposal for six single family homes at 231 York Rd.

At that time, one of the neighbours who spoke against the proposal of 12 semi-detached units said six single family homes was an idea with some merit.

“We would be happy to discuss the details with the city and the landowner should the landowner wish to pursue that option in the future,” said Tracy Rivers.

Planning staff did not respond to the 2011 application to permit an 18-unit townhouse development. The lack of decision was appealed to the OMB by the applicant.

The OMB hearing officer found the proposal was not compatible with the single-family home planned function of the surrounding neighbourhood. The board member stated the proposed development “offends” the character of the neighbourhood.

The landowner came back to the city with a proposal for 12 semi-detached units on the site – and received support from planning staff.

But city councillors on the planning committee rejected the staff recommendation by a vote of five to four, in April 2014.

Former city councillor Brad Clark was one of the votes against the second application. Clark argued supporting 12 semi-detached units would ignore the original OMB decision – which clearly stated the neighbourhood has a single family home planned function.

The applicant appealed that denial to the OMB, and lost a second time.