Canadians should transform how they live to reduce climate change impact, say Hamilton residents

News Aug 17, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamiltonians may have to transform their lives if they want to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, say a group of residents.

“We have to change the way we live,” said Don McLean, during a climate change meeting held Aug. 16 at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 163. “We have to change our expectations on how we function as people in society.”

About 80 people turned out on a hot, muggy evening to talk about how the governments and the community can initiate legislation to help mitigate the effects of climate change. The two-hour event was moderated by Environment Hamilton representatives, and hosted by NDP MPs David Christopherson and Scott Duvall.

The ideas proposed varied from eliminating drive-throughs; make owners of parking lots and other properties that have asphalt more responsible for water runoff; retro-fitting buildings and protecting Ontario’s Greenbelt, to preventing the construction of pipelines, eliminating plastics, investing in renewable resources and public transit, stop subsidizing the fossil fuel industry, while developing alternative fuels, and preserve farmland.

A few people said Canadians need to “live more simply” without the large homes, and gas guzzling vehicles.

Other ideas were more hard edged but received warm applause such as shutting down the tar sands, opposing global trade deals, such as the Trans Pacific Partnership, a trade agreement among 12 nations that was finalized earlier this, but that the federal Liberals have yet to support, or advocating for carbon taxes, with the caveat that there needs to be transparency where the money goes to fund other green projects.

In addition, the gathering enthusiastically supported taxing high income earners and the corporate sector.

The Liberal government has urged MPs to hold various town hall meetings across the country on climate change (and other issues such as electoral reform).  Recently, Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Liberal MP Bob Bratina held a series of public meetings on a variety of issues, but the climate change session attracted the most attendance.

Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Liberal MP Filomena Tassi is also expected to hold a town hall meeting on climate change in September.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau signed the Paris Agreement on climate change earlier this year that requires Canada to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent of 2005 levels by 2030.

But a study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives states that if the tar sands production continues to grow at 100 megatons annually, and if the British Columbia government approves the construction of five liquid natural gas terminals on the coast, Canada’s economy will have to shrink by 55 per cent below 2014 levels to meet the Paris emission targets.

The ideas from the sessions will, federal officials say, help to develop the federal government’s climate change action plan due this fall. Information can still be sent to the federal government’s Environment and Climate Change Canada website.

Christopherson said he remains hopeful the federal Liberals are willing to do something about climate change, a dramatic turnaround from the previous Conservative government which considered the issue a “nuisance.”

He said Canadians were desperate for a change in tone from their government and it’s possible the Liberals will provide it.

“They are at least talking the right language,” said Christopherson.

But he reminded the crowd that the Liberals had promised to implement the recommendations in the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, but failed.

He said Canadians will need to put pressure on the Liberals so “they can live up to their promises.”

Duvall, who represents Hamilton Mountain, said he’s cautiously optimistic the Liberals “will put a plan in place.

“They asked us to do their work for them,” he said. “I’m hopeful (the public ideas from the meetings) means something. I hope it’s not just smoke and mirrors.”

 

Canadians should transform how they live to reduce climate change impact, say Hamilton residents

News Aug 17, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamiltonians may have to transform their lives if they want to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, say a group of residents.

“We have to change the way we live,” said Don McLean, during a climate change meeting held Aug. 16 at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 163. “We have to change our expectations on how we function as people in society.”

About 80 people turned out on a hot, muggy evening to talk about how the governments and the community can initiate legislation to help mitigate the effects of climate change. The two-hour event was moderated by Environment Hamilton representatives, and hosted by NDP MPs David Christopherson and Scott Duvall.

The ideas proposed varied from eliminating drive-throughs; make owners of parking lots and other properties that have asphalt more responsible for water runoff; retro-fitting buildings and protecting Ontario’s Greenbelt, to preventing the construction of pipelines, eliminating plastics, investing in renewable resources and public transit, stop subsidizing the fossil fuel industry, while developing alternative fuels, and preserve farmland.

A few people said Canadians need to “live more simply” without the large homes, and gas guzzling vehicles.

Other ideas were more hard edged but received warm applause such as shutting down the tar sands, opposing global trade deals, such as the Trans Pacific Partnership, a trade agreement among 12 nations that was finalized earlier this, but that the federal Liberals have yet to support, or advocating for carbon taxes, with the caveat that there needs to be transparency where the money goes to fund other green projects.

In addition, the gathering enthusiastically supported taxing high income earners and the corporate sector.

The Liberal government has urged MPs to hold various town hall meetings across the country on climate change (and other issues such as electoral reform).  Recently, Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Liberal MP Bob Bratina held a series of public meetings on a variety of issues, but the climate change session attracted the most attendance.

Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Liberal MP Filomena Tassi is also expected to hold a town hall meeting on climate change in September.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau signed the Paris Agreement on climate change earlier this year that requires Canada to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent of 2005 levels by 2030.

But a study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives states that if the tar sands production continues to grow at 100 megatons annually, and if the British Columbia government approves the construction of five liquid natural gas terminals on the coast, Canada’s economy will have to shrink by 55 per cent below 2014 levels to meet the Paris emission targets.

The ideas from the sessions will, federal officials say, help to develop the federal government’s climate change action plan due this fall. Information can still be sent to the federal government’s Environment and Climate Change Canada website.

Christopherson said he remains hopeful the federal Liberals are willing to do something about climate change, a dramatic turnaround from the previous Conservative government which considered the issue a “nuisance.”

He said Canadians were desperate for a change in tone from their government and it’s possible the Liberals will provide it.

“They are at least talking the right language,” said Christopherson.

But he reminded the crowd that the Liberals had promised to implement the recommendations in the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, but failed.

He said Canadians will need to put pressure on the Liberals so “they can live up to their promises.”

Duvall, who represents Hamilton Mountain, said he’s cautiously optimistic the Liberals “will put a plan in place.

“They asked us to do their work for them,” he said. “I’m hopeful (the public ideas from the meetings) means something. I hope it’s not just smoke and mirrors.”

 

Canadians should transform how they live to reduce climate change impact, say Hamilton residents

News Aug 17, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamiltonians may have to transform their lives if they want to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, say a group of residents.

“We have to change the way we live,” said Don McLean, during a climate change meeting held Aug. 16 at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 163. “We have to change our expectations on how we function as people in society.”

About 80 people turned out on a hot, muggy evening to talk about how the governments and the community can initiate legislation to help mitigate the effects of climate change. The two-hour event was moderated by Environment Hamilton representatives, and hosted by NDP MPs David Christopherson and Scott Duvall.

The ideas proposed varied from eliminating drive-throughs; make owners of parking lots and other properties that have asphalt more responsible for water runoff; retro-fitting buildings and protecting Ontario’s Greenbelt, to preventing the construction of pipelines, eliminating plastics, investing in renewable resources and public transit, stop subsidizing the fossil fuel industry, while developing alternative fuels, and preserve farmland.

A few people said Canadians need to “live more simply” without the large homes, and gas guzzling vehicles.

Other ideas were more hard edged but received warm applause such as shutting down the tar sands, opposing global trade deals, such as the Trans Pacific Partnership, a trade agreement among 12 nations that was finalized earlier this, but that the federal Liberals have yet to support, or advocating for carbon taxes, with the caveat that there needs to be transparency where the money goes to fund other green projects.

In addition, the gathering enthusiastically supported taxing high income earners and the corporate sector.

The Liberal government has urged MPs to hold various town hall meetings across the country on climate change (and other issues such as electoral reform).  Recently, Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Liberal MP Bob Bratina held a series of public meetings on a variety of issues, but the climate change session attracted the most attendance.

Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas Liberal MP Filomena Tassi is also expected to hold a town hall meeting on climate change in September.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau signed the Paris Agreement on climate change earlier this year that requires Canada to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent of 2005 levels by 2030.

But a study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives states that if the tar sands production continues to grow at 100 megatons annually, and if the British Columbia government approves the construction of five liquid natural gas terminals on the coast, Canada’s economy will have to shrink by 55 per cent below 2014 levels to meet the Paris emission targets.

The ideas from the sessions will, federal officials say, help to develop the federal government’s climate change action plan due this fall. Information can still be sent to the federal government’s Environment and Climate Change Canada website.

Christopherson said he remains hopeful the federal Liberals are willing to do something about climate change, a dramatic turnaround from the previous Conservative government which considered the issue a “nuisance.”

He said Canadians were desperate for a change in tone from their government and it’s possible the Liberals will provide it.

“They are at least talking the right language,” said Christopherson.

But he reminded the crowd that the Liberals had promised to implement the recommendations in the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, but failed.

He said Canadians will need to put pressure on the Liberals so “they can live up to their promises.”

Duvall, who represents Hamilton Mountain, said he’s cautiously optimistic the Liberals “will put a plan in place.

“They asked us to do their work for them,” he said. “I’m hopeful (the public ideas from the meetings) means something. I hope it’s not just smoke and mirrors.”