Hamilton to install new pedestrian crossovers in 2016

News Aug 11, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton Mountain residents will be among the first residents to experience the new pedestrian crossovers in the city this year.

Mountain Brow Boulevard and Limeridge Road, and Limeridge Road and west of Mountain Brow Boulevard will have the new pedestrian crossovers, which will include a pedestrian ramp under the province’s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act sometime later in 2016.

The other three locations public works staff will be installing the crossovers after getting approval from the Aug. 11 public works committee, will be at Locke Street and Stanley Avenue, Queen Street and Herkimer Street and Hollybush Drive and west of Pentland Road in Flamborough.

Politicians are expected to approve the recommendation at their Aug. 12 council meeting.

“This makes eminent sense,” said Mountain councillor Tom Jackson.

He said the two intersections have “thousands” of people using them as they walk area trails and attend the Mohawk Sports Park facility.

“I think they will work well,” he said.

The pedestrian crossovers, introduced by the province under the Highway Traffic Act this year, have a defined set of roadside signs and distinctive pavement markings. In some locations the crossovers will have flashing beacons.

Costs to install a crossover range from $15,000 to $30,000, which includes building the signs, and pavement markings.

But Martin White, manager of traffic operations, said the city will install only five initially because he is “concerned” about how drivers will react to the new crossovers.

“Your forcing people to drive in a different fashion,” said White.

He said the province “dropped the ball” when it introduced the new pedestrian crossovers for not properly preparing the public and it will be up to municipalities to properly educate motorists.

Drivers are required to stop at a crossover and must wait until pedestrians have stepped completely off the road before driving through the intersection. Fines could cost motorists up to $500, and the loss of three demerit points.

Crossovers are different than crosswalks, which are typically marked by a stop sign or traffic light. For crosswalks the law remains the same. A motorist can still turn right on a red light if allowed or wait until a pedestrian has passed the vehicle, and then proceed if it is safe to do so.

The new law took effect for crossovers on Jan. 1, 2016 in response to recommendations from a 2012 corner’s report on pedestrian deaths. That report found three per cent of pedestrian deaths in Ontario between 2008 and 2012 occurred at crossovers.

White said the city will introduce a “comprehensive campaign” to inform drivers and pedestrians about the new crossovers.

White said when the crossovers are operational, city staff and Hamilton police officers will be monitoring the locations to tell drivers when to stop.

“(We) want to control the situation,” said White. “We have a lot of work to do.”

In 2017 the city will be installing another 14 crossovers, including at Greenhill Avenue and Mountain Albion Road, Mohawk Road and East 45th Street, Concession Street and East 27th Street; Limeridge Road and Birchview drive, Gray Road and Jasper Drive, Winterberry Drive and north of Highland Road.

“I’m excited to see they are finally here,” said Ward 5 councillor Chad Collins.

White said the city is examining 200 possible locations for crossovers. He expects to install up to 30 crossovers annually, depending upon staff and money available.

 

Hamilton to install new pedestrian crossovers in 2016

News Aug 11, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton Mountain residents will be among the first residents to experience the new pedestrian crossovers in the city this year.

Mountain Brow Boulevard and Limeridge Road, and Limeridge Road and west of Mountain Brow Boulevard will have the new pedestrian crossovers, which will include a pedestrian ramp under the province’s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act sometime later in 2016.

The other three locations public works staff will be installing the crossovers after getting approval from the Aug. 11 public works committee, will be at Locke Street and Stanley Avenue, Queen Street and Herkimer Street and Hollybush Drive and west of Pentland Road in Flamborough.

Politicians are expected to approve the recommendation at their Aug. 12 council meeting.

“This makes eminent sense,” said Mountain councillor Tom Jackson.

He said the two intersections have “thousands” of people using them as they walk area trails and attend the Mohawk Sports Park facility.

“I think they will work well,” he said.

The pedestrian crossovers, introduced by the province under the Highway Traffic Act this year, have a defined set of roadside signs and distinctive pavement markings. In some locations the crossovers will have flashing beacons.

Costs to install a crossover range from $15,000 to $30,000, which includes building the signs, and pavement markings.

But Martin White, manager of traffic operations, said the city will install only five initially because he is “concerned” about how drivers will react to the new crossovers.

“Your forcing people to drive in a different fashion,” said White.

He said the province “dropped the ball” when it introduced the new pedestrian crossovers for not properly preparing the public and it will be up to municipalities to properly educate motorists.

Drivers are required to stop at a crossover and must wait until pedestrians have stepped completely off the road before driving through the intersection. Fines could cost motorists up to $500, and the loss of three demerit points.

Crossovers are different than crosswalks, which are typically marked by a stop sign or traffic light. For crosswalks the law remains the same. A motorist can still turn right on a red light if allowed or wait until a pedestrian has passed the vehicle, and then proceed if it is safe to do so.

The new law took effect for crossovers on Jan. 1, 2016 in response to recommendations from a 2012 corner’s report on pedestrian deaths. That report found three per cent of pedestrian deaths in Ontario between 2008 and 2012 occurred at crossovers.

White said the city will introduce a “comprehensive campaign” to inform drivers and pedestrians about the new crossovers.

White said when the crossovers are operational, city staff and Hamilton police officers will be monitoring the locations to tell drivers when to stop.

“(We) want to control the situation,” said White. “We have a lot of work to do.”

In 2017 the city will be installing another 14 crossovers, including at Greenhill Avenue and Mountain Albion Road, Mohawk Road and East 45th Street, Concession Street and East 27th Street; Limeridge Road and Birchview drive, Gray Road and Jasper Drive, Winterberry Drive and north of Highland Road.

“I’m excited to see they are finally here,” said Ward 5 councillor Chad Collins.

White said the city is examining 200 possible locations for crossovers. He expects to install up to 30 crossovers annually, depending upon staff and money available.

 

Hamilton to install new pedestrian crossovers in 2016

News Aug 11, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton Mountain residents will be among the first residents to experience the new pedestrian crossovers in the city this year.

Mountain Brow Boulevard and Limeridge Road, and Limeridge Road and west of Mountain Brow Boulevard will have the new pedestrian crossovers, which will include a pedestrian ramp under the province’s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act sometime later in 2016.

The other three locations public works staff will be installing the crossovers after getting approval from the Aug. 11 public works committee, will be at Locke Street and Stanley Avenue, Queen Street and Herkimer Street and Hollybush Drive and west of Pentland Road in Flamborough.

Politicians are expected to approve the recommendation at their Aug. 12 council meeting.

“This makes eminent sense,” said Mountain councillor Tom Jackson.

He said the two intersections have “thousands” of people using them as they walk area trails and attend the Mohawk Sports Park facility.

“I think they will work well,” he said.

The pedestrian crossovers, introduced by the province under the Highway Traffic Act this year, have a defined set of roadside signs and distinctive pavement markings. In some locations the crossovers will have flashing beacons.

Costs to install a crossover range from $15,000 to $30,000, which includes building the signs, and pavement markings.

But Martin White, manager of traffic operations, said the city will install only five initially because he is “concerned” about how drivers will react to the new crossovers.

“Your forcing people to drive in a different fashion,” said White.

He said the province “dropped the ball” when it introduced the new pedestrian crossovers for not properly preparing the public and it will be up to municipalities to properly educate motorists.

Drivers are required to stop at a crossover and must wait until pedestrians have stepped completely off the road before driving through the intersection. Fines could cost motorists up to $500, and the loss of three demerit points.

Crossovers are different than crosswalks, which are typically marked by a stop sign or traffic light. For crosswalks the law remains the same. A motorist can still turn right on a red light if allowed or wait until a pedestrian has passed the vehicle, and then proceed if it is safe to do so.

The new law took effect for crossovers on Jan. 1, 2016 in response to recommendations from a 2012 corner’s report on pedestrian deaths. That report found three per cent of pedestrian deaths in Ontario between 2008 and 2012 occurred at crossovers.

White said the city will introduce a “comprehensive campaign” to inform drivers and pedestrians about the new crossovers.

White said when the crossovers are operational, city staff and Hamilton police officers will be monitoring the locations to tell drivers when to stop.

“(We) want to control the situation,” said White. “We have a lot of work to do.”

In 2017 the city will be installing another 14 crossovers, including at Greenhill Avenue and Mountain Albion Road, Mohawk Road and East 45th Street, Concession Street and East 27th Street; Limeridge Road and Birchview drive, Gray Road and Jasper Drive, Winterberry Drive and north of Highland Road.

“I’m excited to see they are finally here,” said Ward 5 councillor Chad Collins.

White said the city is examining 200 possible locations for crossovers. He expects to install up to 30 crossovers annually, depending upon staff and money available.