Ontario Tory leader Patrick Brown talks energy prices, union support and Trump for 2018

News Jul 25, 2016 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown says his predecessor, Tim Hudak, had the right message to win the 2014 provincial election.

But a “foolish” endorsement of cutting 100,000 public sector jobs by the former Tory leader cost the party the election it had lead in early election polls over Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals.

Brown, who talked about high energy prices, cutting red tape, improving skills-based education and infrastructure during a business roundtable session at the Dutch Mill Country Market July 25, sponsored by the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce, says the party is poised for victory in the area, if not the province.

“There were good issues Tim raised (in 2014),” Brown told reporters. “Any other issue that would have merit attention got lost in a promise and commitment (to cut 100,000 government jobs) that was foolish.”

Instead, Brown says he sees unions as “partners” with the party as he “works closely” with them to create a PC campaign agenda.

“I don’t view the public sector (unions) as adversaries, I view them as partners,” he says.

Brown says the 2018 provincial election is one year and 10 months away, “and it will fly by fast, not that I’m counting.”

The former Conservative MP from Barrie says party polls indicate the Tories will win the new riding of Flamborough-Glanbrook, already represented by Conservative MP David Sweet, which was realigned following Ontario’s riding redistribution.

“This is a riding we are going to win in two years,” he said. “We will invest time here. There is some Conservative history here I’m particularly aware of given my working for (former Ontario Tory MPP) Toni Skarica.”

Brown says the top issue he has found across the province, including Hamilton, which people are worried about is high energy prices.

“People are livid with their hydro bills,” he says.

Brown also talked about a PC government cutting government red tape, reducing the “regulation burden” for businesses, spending within the government’s budget, investing in infrastructure, and creating the proper skilled trade jobs that businesses need.

“We need more engineers, not more political science (majors),” said Brown, who earned a political science degree.

As the United States experiences a new form of populism as espoused by businessman Donald Trump, Brown distanced himself from the message.

He doesn’t expect Trump’s form of political revolution to take hold in Ontario.

“I don’t see that,” said Brown. “And certainly that is not a flavor of populism that I would be comfortable with.”

 

Ontario Tory leader Patrick Brown talks energy prices, union support and Trump for 2018

News Jul 25, 2016 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown says his predecessor, Tim Hudak, had the right message to win the 2014 provincial election.

But a “foolish” endorsement of cutting 100,000 public sector jobs by the former Tory leader cost the party the election it had lead in early election polls over Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals.

Brown, who talked about high energy prices, cutting red tape, improving skills-based education and infrastructure during a business roundtable session at the Dutch Mill Country Market July 25, sponsored by the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce, says the party is poised for victory in the area, if not the province.

“There were good issues Tim raised (in 2014),” Brown told reporters. “Any other issue that would have merit attention got lost in a promise and commitment (to cut 100,000 government jobs) that was foolish.”

Instead, Brown says he sees unions as “partners” with the party as he “works closely” with them to create a PC campaign agenda.

“I don’t view the public sector (unions) as adversaries, I view them as partners,” he says.

Brown says the 2018 provincial election is one year and 10 months away, “and it will fly by fast, not that I’m counting.”

The former Conservative MP from Barrie says party polls indicate the Tories will win the new riding of Flamborough-Glanbrook, already represented by Conservative MP David Sweet, which was realigned following Ontario’s riding redistribution.

“This is a riding we are going to win in two years,” he said. “We will invest time here. There is some Conservative history here I’m particularly aware of given my working for (former Ontario Tory MPP) Toni Skarica.”

Brown says the top issue he has found across the province, including Hamilton, which people are worried about is high energy prices.

“People are livid with their hydro bills,” he says.

Brown also talked about a PC government cutting government red tape, reducing the “regulation burden” for businesses, spending within the government’s budget, investing in infrastructure, and creating the proper skilled trade jobs that businesses need.

“We need more engineers, not more political science (majors),” said Brown, who earned a political science degree.

As the United States experiences a new form of populism as espoused by businessman Donald Trump, Brown distanced himself from the message.

He doesn’t expect Trump’s form of political revolution to take hold in Ontario.

“I don’t see that,” said Brown. “And certainly that is not a flavor of populism that I would be comfortable with.”

 

Ontario Tory leader Patrick Brown talks energy prices, union support and Trump for 2018

News Jul 25, 2016 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown says his predecessor, Tim Hudak, had the right message to win the 2014 provincial election.

But a “foolish” endorsement of cutting 100,000 public sector jobs by the former Tory leader cost the party the election it had lead in early election polls over Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals.

Brown, who talked about high energy prices, cutting red tape, improving skills-based education and infrastructure during a business roundtable session at the Dutch Mill Country Market July 25, sponsored by the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce, says the party is poised for victory in the area, if not the province.

“There were good issues Tim raised (in 2014),” Brown told reporters. “Any other issue that would have merit attention got lost in a promise and commitment (to cut 100,000 government jobs) that was foolish.”

Instead, Brown says he sees unions as “partners” with the party as he “works closely” with them to create a PC campaign agenda.

“I don’t view the public sector (unions) as adversaries, I view them as partners,” he says.

Brown says the 2018 provincial election is one year and 10 months away, “and it will fly by fast, not that I’m counting.”

The former Conservative MP from Barrie says party polls indicate the Tories will win the new riding of Flamborough-Glanbrook, already represented by Conservative MP David Sweet, which was realigned following Ontario’s riding redistribution.

“This is a riding we are going to win in two years,” he said. “We will invest time here. There is some Conservative history here I’m particularly aware of given my working for (former Ontario Tory MPP) Toni Skarica.”

Brown says the top issue he has found across the province, including Hamilton, which people are worried about is high energy prices.

“People are livid with their hydro bills,” he says.

Brown also talked about a PC government cutting government red tape, reducing the “regulation burden” for businesses, spending within the government’s budget, investing in infrastructure, and creating the proper skilled trade jobs that businesses need.

“We need more engineers, not more political science (majors),” said Brown, who earned a political science degree.

As the United States experiences a new form of populism as espoused by businessman Donald Trump, Brown distanced himself from the message.

He doesn’t expect Trump’s form of political revolution to take hold in Ontario.

“I don’t see that,” said Brown. “And certainly that is not a flavor of populism that I would be comfortable with.”