MPP Monique Taylor credits parents for provincial change on autism funding

News Jul 06, 2016 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Nancy Silva-Khan is happy and relieved for her four-and-a-half-year-old identical twin boys and for other parents of children with autism.

“It gives us a lot of hope,” Silva-Khan said last week after the Wynne government announced it would be pouring another $200 million into autism services over the next four years so that children of all ages can get treatment.

Last April the province announced that as of 2018 that it would no longer fund Intensive Behavioural Intervention (IBI) for children age five and older and would give parents on the IBI wait list $8,000 to pay for private treatment.

The decision drew protests from parents of autistic children, many of whom took to social media and staged rallies to blast the Wynne government.

They argued $8,000 was not nearly enough to cover the cost of treatment.

Silva-Khan recalled being informed last March that her boys Atticus and Darwin had been approved for IBI treatment only to find out a month later that under the new policy it was unlikely they would be getting the help they needed.

“I was lucky my husband was home because I just basically collapsed on the floor and started crying and hyperventilating,” said Silva-Khan, who noted her boys also have a genetic mutation that could leave them blind and wheelchair-bound by the time they are 45.

Silva-Khan said it was the determination and perseverance of the parents that forced the Wynne government to change its policy.

“If parents had kept quiet and sat back, nothing would have happened,” said Silva-Khan, who is now being referred to by her husband Fyyaz Khan as one of the “warrior moms” that pushed the province to change its policy.

“I’m happy to see the government is moving in a different direction to ensure all kids get services,” said Hamilton Mountain NDP MPP Monique Taylor, who as Children and Youth Services critic was among the opposition members in the Ontario Legislature that had been blasting the Liberals over the funding changes.

Last May she was ejected for the Legislature for refusing to stop haranguing the government over the cuts.

Taylor credits the parents and the Ontario Autism Coalition for getting the Wynne government to change its policy by bombarding the province with letters, petitions, emails and tweets.

“Everywhere the Premier (Kathleen Wynne) was they showed up, their tenacity has definitely paid off,” Taylor said.

Taylor and Silva-Khan said they will be watching to ensure the new funding gets delivered including the promise to increase the payout to parents from $8,000 to $10,000 to help pay for treatment services.

The new funding was also a welcome birthday present for Taylor, who turned 44 on the day it was announced.

 

MPP Monique Taylor credits parents for provincial change on autism funding

Wynne government adds another $200 million over four years

News Jul 06, 2016 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Nancy Silva-Khan is happy and relieved for her four-and-a-half-year-old identical twin boys and for other parents of children with autism.

“It gives us a lot of hope,” Silva-Khan said last week after the Wynne government announced it would be pouring another $200 million into autism services over the next four years so that children of all ages can get treatment.

Last April the province announced that as of 2018 that it would no longer fund Intensive Behavioural Intervention (IBI) for children age five and older and would give parents on the IBI wait list $8,000 to pay for private treatment.

The decision drew protests from parents of autistic children, many of whom took to social media and staged rallies to blast the Wynne government.

They argued $8,000 was not nearly enough to cover the cost of treatment.

Silva-Khan recalled being informed last March that her boys Atticus and Darwin had been approved for IBI treatment only to find out a month later that under the new policy it was unlikely they would be getting the help they needed.

“I was lucky my husband was home because I just basically collapsed on the floor and started crying and hyperventilating,” said Silva-Khan, who noted her boys also have a genetic mutation that could leave them blind and wheelchair-bound by the time they are 45.

Silva-Khan said it was the determination and perseverance of the parents that forced the Wynne government to change its policy.

“If parents had kept quiet and sat back, nothing would have happened,” said Silva-Khan, who is now being referred to by her husband Fyyaz Khan as one of the “warrior moms” that pushed the province to change its policy.

“I’m happy to see the government is moving in a different direction to ensure all kids get services,” said Hamilton Mountain NDP MPP Monique Taylor, who as Children and Youth Services critic was among the opposition members in the Ontario Legislature that had been blasting the Liberals over the funding changes.

Last May she was ejected for the Legislature for refusing to stop haranguing the government over the cuts.

Taylor credits the parents and the Ontario Autism Coalition for getting the Wynne government to change its policy by bombarding the province with letters, petitions, emails and tweets.

“Everywhere the Premier (Kathleen Wynne) was they showed up, their tenacity has definitely paid off,” Taylor said.

Taylor and Silva-Khan said they will be watching to ensure the new funding gets delivered including the promise to increase the payout to parents from $8,000 to $10,000 to help pay for treatment services.

The new funding was also a welcome birthday present for Taylor, who turned 44 on the day it was announced.

 

MPP Monique Taylor credits parents for provincial change on autism funding

Wynne government adds another $200 million over four years

News Jul 06, 2016 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Nancy Silva-Khan is happy and relieved for her four-and-a-half-year-old identical twin boys and for other parents of children with autism.

“It gives us a lot of hope,” Silva-Khan said last week after the Wynne government announced it would be pouring another $200 million into autism services over the next four years so that children of all ages can get treatment.

Last April the province announced that as of 2018 that it would no longer fund Intensive Behavioural Intervention (IBI) for children age five and older and would give parents on the IBI wait list $8,000 to pay for private treatment.

The decision drew protests from parents of autistic children, many of whom took to social media and staged rallies to blast the Wynne government.

They argued $8,000 was not nearly enough to cover the cost of treatment.

Silva-Khan recalled being informed last March that her boys Atticus and Darwin had been approved for IBI treatment only to find out a month later that under the new policy it was unlikely they would be getting the help they needed.

“I was lucky my husband was home because I just basically collapsed on the floor and started crying and hyperventilating,” said Silva-Khan, who noted her boys also have a genetic mutation that could leave them blind and wheelchair-bound by the time they are 45.

Silva-Khan said it was the determination and perseverance of the parents that forced the Wynne government to change its policy.

“If parents had kept quiet and sat back, nothing would have happened,” said Silva-Khan, who is now being referred to by her husband Fyyaz Khan as one of the “warrior moms” that pushed the province to change its policy.

“I’m happy to see the government is moving in a different direction to ensure all kids get services,” said Hamilton Mountain NDP MPP Monique Taylor, who as Children and Youth Services critic was among the opposition members in the Ontario Legislature that had been blasting the Liberals over the funding changes.

Last May she was ejected for the Legislature for refusing to stop haranguing the government over the cuts.

Taylor credits the parents and the Ontario Autism Coalition for getting the Wynne government to change its policy by bombarding the province with letters, petitions, emails and tweets.

“Everywhere the Premier (Kathleen Wynne) was they showed up, their tenacity has definitely paid off,” Taylor said.

Taylor and Silva-Khan said they will be watching to ensure the new funding gets delivered including the promise to increase the payout to parents from $8,000 to $10,000 to help pay for treatment services.

The new funding was also a welcome birthday present for Taylor, who turned 44 on the day it was announced.