Ontario green lights GO train service to Niagara by 2021

News Jun 28, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario government is bringing GO train service to the Niagara Region from the soon-to-be constructed Confederation Go Station to a new Grimsby GO Station by 2021.

Ontario Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca announced during a June 28 new conference at the St. Catharines train station the province will provide weekday GO rail service to Niagara Falls by 2023.

“This will create jobs and manage congestion,” said Del Duca, surrounded by Niagara area politicians and supporters of GO rail service.

Alan Caslin, Niagara Regional chair, said the new GO rail service to the Niagara area will mean an economic uplift of about $195 million.

Del Duca said construction on the new GO station at Casablanca in Grimsby, along with upgrades to the train stations in St. Catharines and Niagara Falls, could begin as soon as the summer of 2017. In addition, construction of the new Confederation GO Station will begin in 2017 with a completion date of 2019.

Del Duca announced in May 2015 the province will be providing about $150 million to build the new Confederation Go Station. About $35 million will be used to construct the station, with $115 million dedicated to rail upgrades.

Bob Nichols, senior media communications officer with the Transportation Ministry, said at each GO station there will be parking, bus facilities, and pedestrian access to the area. The number of parking spots will be determined through the design phase.

Del Duca said Metrolinx has been in negotiations with Canadian National Railway which owns the rail line to finalize a service and infrastructure agreement. Absent an agreement, Del Duca couldn’t say what the cost of the new service and stations will be.

The Niagara Region has committed $40 million to the Niagara GO Train service, one-third of the expected bill. Estimates have pegged the cost of providing the service anywhere between $100 million to $120 million.

The province has also eliminated the obstacle of the GO train service crossing the Welland Canal. Earlier this year it was announced the St. Lawrence Seaway agreed to four dedicated train crossings across the canal daily.

Del Duca said if the work to provide train service to Niagara can move faster, it will be accomplished.

“The funding is there, our government’s desire is there,” he said.

The province is planning to make track improvements, build a new layover station in Niagara Falls, and adding 30 kilometres of new track. Del Duca said the proposed rail service to Niagara is predicated on accommodating commuters, which means morning and evening trains.

He said the funding remains in place to build the service to Niagara Region.

“All of the internal approvals that I need are in place including financial approvals,” said Del Duca.

He couldn’t provide a timeline when an agreement with CN will be in place, except to say “soon.”

“I feel optimistic about where we are,” he said.

Caslin said there were “no showstoppers” to cause any delays in providing rail service to Niagara.

Del Duca said discussions with a CN and Canadian Pacific on extending GO train service from Aldershot to Hamilton is ongoing.

“There is no change,” he said.

 

 

Ontario green lights GO train service to Niagara by 2021

News Jun 28, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario government is bringing GO train service to the Niagara Region from the soon-to-be constructed Confederation Go Station to a new Grimsby GO Station by 2021.

Ontario Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca announced during a June 28 new conference at the St. Catharines train station the province will provide weekday GO rail service to Niagara Falls by 2023.

“This will create jobs and manage congestion,” said Del Duca, surrounded by Niagara area politicians and supporters of GO rail service.

Alan Caslin, Niagara Regional chair, said the new GO rail service to the Niagara area will mean an economic uplift of about $195 million.

Del Duca said construction on the new GO station at Casablanca in Grimsby, along with upgrades to the train stations in St. Catharines and Niagara Falls, could begin as soon as the summer of 2017. In addition, construction of the new Confederation GO Station will begin in 2017 with a completion date of 2019.

Del Duca announced in May 2015 the province will be providing about $150 million to build the new Confederation Go Station. About $35 million will be used to construct the station, with $115 million dedicated to rail upgrades.

Bob Nichols, senior media communications officer with the Transportation Ministry, said at each GO station there will be parking, bus facilities, and pedestrian access to the area. The number of parking spots will be determined through the design phase.

Del Duca said Metrolinx has been in negotiations with Canadian National Railway which owns the rail line to finalize a service and infrastructure agreement. Absent an agreement, Del Duca couldn’t say what the cost of the new service and stations will be.

The Niagara Region has committed $40 million to the Niagara GO Train service, one-third of the expected bill. Estimates have pegged the cost of providing the service anywhere between $100 million to $120 million.

The province has also eliminated the obstacle of the GO train service crossing the Welland Canal. Earlier this year it was announced the St. Lawrence Seaway agreed to four dedicated train crossings across the canal daily.

Del Duca said if the work to provide train service to Niagara can move faster, it will be accomplished.

“The funding is there, our government’s desire is there,” he said.

The province is planning to make track improvements, build a new layover station in Niagara Falls, and adding 30 kilometres of new track. Del Duca said the proposed rail service to Niagara is predicated on accommodating commuters, which means morning and evening trains.

He said the funding remains in place to build the service to Niagara Region.

“All of the internal approvals that I need are in place including financial approvals,” said Del Duca.

He couldn’t provide a timeline when an agreement with CN will be in place, except to say “soon.”

“I feel optimistic about where we are,” he said.

Caslin said there were “no showstoppers” to cause any delays in providing rail service to Niagara.

Del Duca said discussions with a CN and Canadian Pacific on extending GO train service from Aldershot to Hamilton is ongoing.

“There is no change,” he said.

 

 

Ontario green lights GO train service to Niagara by 2021

News Jun 28, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario government is bringing GO train service to the Niagara Region from the soon-to-be constructed Confederation Go Station to a new Grimsby GO Station by 2021.

Ontario Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca announced during a June 28 new conference at the St. Catharines train station the province will provide weekday GO rail service to Niagara Falls by 2023.

“This will create jobs and manage congestion,” said Del Duca, surrounded by Niagara area politicians and supporters of GO rail service.

Alan Caslin, Niagara Regional chair, said the new GO rail service to the Niagara area will mean an economic uplift of about $195 million.

Del Duca said construction on the new GO station at Casablanca in Grimsby, along with upgrades to the train stations in St. Catharines and Niagara Falls, could begin as soon as the summer of 2017. In addition, construction of the new Confederation GO Station will begin in 2017 with a completion date of 2019.

Del Duca announced in May 2015 the province will be providing about $150 million to build the new Confederation Go Station. About $35 million will be used to construct the station, with $115 million dedicated to rail upgrades.

Bob Nichols, senior media communications officer with the Transportation Ministry, said at each GO station there will be parking, bus facilities, and pedestrian access to the area. The number of parking spots will be determined through the design phase.

Del Duca said Metrolinx has been in negotiations with Canadian National Railway which owns the rail line to finalize a service and infrastructure agreement. Absent an agreement, Del Duca couldn’t say what the cost of the new service and stations will be.

The Niagara Region has committed $40 million to the Niagara GO Train service, one-third of the expected bill. Estimates have pegged the cost of providing the service anywhere between $100 million to $120 million.

The province has also eliminated the obstacle of the GO train service crossing the Welland Canal. Earlier this year it was announced the St. Lawrence Seaway agreed to four dedicated train crossings across the canal daily.

Del Duca said if the work to provide train service to Niagara can move faster, it will be accomplished.

“The funding is there, our government’s desire is there,” he said.

The province is planning to make track improvements, build a new layover station in Niagara Falls, and adding 30 kilometres of new track. Del Duca said the proposed rail service to Niagara is predicated on accommodating commuters, which means morning and evening trains.

He said the funding remains in place to build the service to Niagara Region.

“All of the internal approvals that I need are in place including financial approvals,” said Del Duca.

He couldn’t provide a timeline when an agreement with CN will be in place, except to say “soon.”

“I feel optimistic about where we are,” he said.

Caslin said there were “no showstoppers” to cause any delays in providing rail service to Niagara.

Del Duca said discussions with a CN and Canadian Pacific on extending GO train service from Aldershot to Hamilton is ongoing.

“There is no change,” he said.