St. Matthew’s House remains beacon of hope for Barton community

News May 06, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

St. Matthew’s House has re-emerged to provide the Barton Village community with renewed sense of hope for their families.

Hamilton officials, the Anglican Diocese of Niagara, volunteers, and employees of St. Matthew’s House celebrated May 6 as they helped to celebrate the grand re-opening of the facility with an expanded child care facility and larger food bank.

“St. Matthews House is truly a place where hope lives,” said Glenna Swing, chair of the board of directors. “The improvements made here at this site will ensure that St. Matthew’s continues to be able to offer a safe and loving environment for children.”

A renovation to the St. Matthew’s Children’s Centre, located on Barton Street East, totaled $500,000 and was funded by the city of Hamilton. The work included relocating the centre to the second floor of the nearly century-old building to improve accessibility and add an extra classroom for its new infant program. There are now 51 children in the program, an increase of 10 children, from ages three months to pre-school age.

During the festivities, the new children’s centre room was officially named after Angela Daudu, who manages the children’s centre. Daudu, who comes from a family of 14 siblings, and was shocked by the honour, said her days are always brightened by the smiling faces of the children she helps.

“I know we do make a difference in the lives of these children,” she said.

The Ontario Trillium Foundation provided St. Matthew’s House with $143,000 to expand its food bank service, which provides food to about 800 families a month. The renovations expanded the basement, waterproofed and stabilized the structure.

Karen Randell, manager of social services, said by enlarging the basement, it will allow organizers to store more food, and reach additional people. The food bank is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. She said at times people were forced to line up outside the building, including on wintery days waiting for a box of food. During the renovations, St. Matthew’s food bank service was offered at its Roxborough food bank at St. Helen’s Centre.

The renovations were completed in 2015, the first time that the two buildings have had any improvements done since the 1980s.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger praised St. Matthew’s House for remaining in the community to provide a necessary service to the neighbourhood.

“I hope the recent announcement from the city of Hamilton we will be able to put more resources into poverty, homelessness and affordable housing that will do an even better job in the future of looking after those people that need the help,” said Eisenberger, who acknowledged it was the first time he has been inside the facility.

The mayor was referring to councillors’ recent approval to invest $50 million over 10 years in affordable housing and poverty reduction programs. A plan will be presented to politicians later this fall on how that funding will be used.

“St. Matthew’s House has taken on that responsibility since 1967,” said Eisenberger. “This is an area of our society that we can no longer ignore, that we need to give it more attention (and) make the kinds of investments that will matter. You have been doing that for decades.”

St. Matthew’s House remains beacon of hope for Barton community

News May 06, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

St. Matthew’s House has re-emerged to provide the Barton Village community with renewed sense of hope for their families.

Hamilton officials, the Anglican Diocese of Niagara, volunteers, and employees of St. Matthew’s House celebrated May 6 as they helped to celebrate the grand re-opening of the facility with an expanded child care facility and larger food bank.

“St. Matthews House is truly a place where hope lives,” said Glenna Swing, chair of the board of directors. “The improvements made here at this site will ensure that St. Matthew’s continues to be able to offer a safe and loving environment for children.”

A renovation to the St. Matthew’s Children’s Centre, located on Barton Street East, totaled $500,000 and was funded by the city of Hamilton. The work included relocating the centre to the second floor of the nearly century-old building to improve accessibility and add an extra classroom for its new infant program. There are now 51 children in the program, an increase of 10 children, from ages three months to pre-school age.

During the festivities, the new children’s centre room was officially named after Angela Daudu, who manages the children’s centre. Daudu, who comes from a family of 14 siblings, and was shocked by the honour, said her days are always brightened by the smiling faces of the children she helps.

“I know we do make a difference in the lives of these children,” she said.

The Ontario Trillium Foundation provided St. Matthew’s House with $143,000 to expand its food bank service, which provides food to about 800 families a month. The renovations expanded the basement, waterproofed and stabilized the structure.

Karen Randell, manager of social services, said by enlarging the basement, it will allow organizers to store more food, and reach additional people. The food bank is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. She said at times people were forced to line up outside the building, including on wintery days waiting for a box of food. During the renovations, St. Matthew’s food bank service was offered at its Roxborough food bank at St. Helen’s Centre.

The renovations were completed in 2015, the first time that the two buildings have had any improvements done since the 1980s.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger praised St. Matthew’s House for remaining in the community to provide a necessary service to the neighbourhood.

“I hope the recent announcement from the city of Hamilton we will be able to put more resources into poverty, homelessness and affordable housing that will do an even better job in the future of looking after those people that need the help,” said Eisenberger, who acknowledged it was the first time he has been inside the facility.

The mayor was referring to councillors’ recent approval to invest $50 million over 10 years in affordable housing and poverty reduction programs. A plan will be presented to politicians later this fall on how that funding will be used.

“St. Matthew’s House has taken on that responsibility since 1967,” said Eisenberger. “This is an area of our society that we can no longer ignore, that we need to give it more attention (and) make the kinds of investments that will matter. You have been doing that for decades.”

St. Matthew’s House remains beacon of hope for Barton community

News May 06, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

St. Matthew’s House has re-emerged to provide the Barton Village community with renewed sense of hope for their families.

Hamilton officials, the Anglican Diocese of Niagara, volunteers, and employees of St. Matthew’s House celebrated May 6 as they helped to celebrate the grand re-opening of the facility with an expanded child care facility and larger food bank.

“St. Matthews House is truly a place where hope lives,” said Glenna Swing, chair of the board of directors. “The improvements made here at this site will ensure that St. Matthew’s continues to be able to offer a safe and loving environment for children.”

A renovation to the St. Matthew’s Children’s Centre, located on Barton Street East, totaled $500,000 and was funded by the city of Hamilton. The work included relocating the centre to the second floor of the nearly century-old building to improve accessibility and add an extra classroom for its new infant program. There are now 51 children in the program, an increase of 10 children, from ages three months to pre-school age.

During the festivities, the new children’s centre room was officially named after Angela Daudu, who manages the children’s centre. Daudu, who comes from a family of 14 siblings, and was shocked by the honour, said her days are always brightened by the smiling faces of the children she helps.

“I know we do make a difference in the lives of these children,” she said.

The Ontario Trillium Foundation provided St. Matthew’s House with $143,000 to expand its food bank service, which provides food to about 800 families a month. The renovations expanded the basement, waterproofed and stabilized the structure.

Karen Randell, manager of social services, said by enlarging the basement, it will allow organizers to store more food, and reach additional people. The food bank is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. She said at times people were forced to line up outside the building, including on wintery days waiting for a box of food. During the renovations, St. Matthew’s food bank service was offered at its Roxborough food bank at St. Helen’s Centre.

The renovations were completed in 2015, the first time that the two buildings have had any improvements done since the 1980s.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger praised St. Matthew’s House for remaining in the community to provide a necessary service to the neighbourhood.

“I hope the recent announcement from the city of Hamilton we will be able to put more resources into poverty, homelessness and affordable housing that will do an even better job in the future of looking after those people that need the help,” said Eisenberger, who acknowledged it was the first time he has been inside the facility.

The mayor was referring to councillors’ recent approval to invest $50 million over 10 years in affordable housing and poverty reduction programs. A plan will be presented to politicians later this fall on how that funding will be used.

“St. Matthew’s House has taken on that responsibility since 1967,” said Eisenberger. “This is an area of our society that we can no longer ignore, that we need to give it more attention (and) make the kinds of investments that will matter. You have been doing that for decades.”