Hamilton’s security policy gets own review

News Feb 08, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

An investigation of how Hamilton handles its surveillance video footage has turned into a need for a comprehensive security program for the city after councillors discovered Hamilton doesn’t have an overall security plan for its facilities.

“That’s pretty shocking,” said Ward 3 councillor Matthew Green. “It’s a shock to not have a comprehensive program. We are trying to do that now.”

Councillors last December requested City Manager Chris Murray to review Hamilton’s security program, concentrating on video surveillance. But the report presented to the Feb. 3 general issues committee meeting went beyond video surveillance and identified Hamilton’s jumbled security programs.

The review was prompted by Councillor Lloyd Ferguson and journalist Joey Coleman’s shoving incident. The confrontation was captured on the city’s surveillance video, but 15 seconds of it was cut out.

The report acknowledged that the city’s security protocols “lack consistency in approaches.”

Rom D’Angelo, director of facilities management and capital programs, told politicians “things are happening ad hoc.”

In 2006 a security master plan and security management plan was completed. It was followed by a second security planning review between 2012-2014 that identified a number of areas of risk, including to the city’s transit system; water and wastewater plant and Hamilton’s five remote water plants. A security program was created to address the issues.

In addition, since the 2006 security report, there has been a number of “security breaches” that have been dealt with as the incidents have occurred by the city.

 Green said since his election in 2014, he has been involved in at least three “crisis intervention” situations in the lobby of City Hall that had to be handled by security personnel.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead, who has been involved in past security issues  when he was chief of staff for former mayor Bob Morrow, said the Ferguson-Coleman video revealed the city’s video surveillance is limited to provide needed security.

“Do we have adequate technology?” he said.

Murray agreed with councillors. Not only does the city “need to have good policy and procedures, we need good equipment.”

Politicians requested staff create a long-term security management model, including a budget, and provide to council a report prior to the 2017 budget process.

 

Hamilton’s security policy gets own review

News Feb 08, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

An investigation of how Hamilton handles its surveillance video footage has turned into a need for a comprehensive security program for the city after councillors discovered Hamilton doesn’t have an overall security plan for its facilities.

“That’s pretty shocking,” said Ward 3 councillor Matthew Green. “It’s a shock to not have a comprehensive program. We are trying to do that now.”

Councillors last December requested City Manager Chris Murray to review Hamilton’s security program, concentrating on video surveillance. But the report presented to the Feb. 3 general issues committee meeting went beyond video surveillance and identified Hamilton’s jumbled security programs.

The review was prompted by Councillor Lloyd Ferguson and journalist Joey Coleman’s shoving incident. The confrontation was captured on the city’s surveillance video, but 15 seconds of it was cut out.

The report acknowledged that the city’s security protocols “lack consistency in approaches.”

Rom D’Angelo, director of facilities management and capital programs, told politicians “things are happening ad hoc.”

In 2006 a security master plan and security management plan was completed. It was followed by a second security planning review between 2012-2014 that identified a number of areas of risk, including to the city’s transit system; water and wastewater plant and Hamilton’s five remote water plants. A security program was created to address the issues.

In addition, since the 2006 security report, there has been a number of “security breaches” that have been dealt with as the incidents have occurred by the city.

 Green said since his election in 2014, he has been involved in at least three “crisis intervention” situations in the lobby of City Hall that had to be handled by security personnel.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead, who has been involved in past security issues  when he was chief of staff for former mayor Bob Morrow, said the Ferguson-Coleman video revealed the city’s video surveillance is limited to provide needed security.

“Do we have adequate technology?” he said.

Murray agreed with councillors. Not only does the city “need to have good policy and procedures, we need good equipment.”

Politicians requested staff create a long-term security management model, including a budget, and provide to council a report prior to the 2017 budget process.

 

Hamilton’s security policy gets own review

News Feb 08, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

An investigation of how Hamilton handles its surveillance video footage has turned into a need for a comprehensive security program for the city after councillors discovered Hamilton doesn’t have an overall security plan for its facilities.

“That’s pretty shocking,” said Ward 3 councillor Matthew Green. “It’s a shock to not have a comprehensive program. We are trying to do that now.”

Councillors last December requested City Manager Chris Murray to review Hamilton’s security program, concentrating on video surveillance. But the report presented to the Feb. 3 general issues committee meeting went beyond video surveillance and identified Hamilton’s jumbled security programs.

The review was prompted by Councillor Lloyd Ferguson and journalist Joey Coleman’s shoving incident. The confrontation was captured on the city’s surveillance video, but 15 seconds of it was cut out.

The report acknowledged that the city’s security protocols “lack consistency in approaches.”

Rom D’Angelo, director of facilities management and capital programs, told politicians “things are happening ad hoc.”

In 2006 a security master plan and security management plan was completed. It was followed by a second security planning review between 2012-2014 that identified a number of areas of risk, including to the city’s transit system; water and wastewater plant and Hamilton’s five remote water plants. A security program was created to address the issues.

In addition, since the 2006 security report, there has been a number of “security breaches” that have been dealt with as the incidents have occurred by the city.

 Green said since his election in 2014, he has been involved in at least three “crisis intervention” situations in the lobby of City Hall that had to be handled by security personnel.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead, who has been involved in past security issues  when he was chief of staff for former mayor Bob Morrow, said the Ferguson-Coleman video revealed the city’s video surveillance is limited to provide needed security.

“Do we have adequate technology?” he said.

Murray agreed with councillors. Not only does the city “need to have good policy and procedures, we need good equipment.”

Politicians requested staff create a long-term security management model, including a budget, and provide to council a report prior to the 2017 budget process.