Hamilton MPs question Liberals' commitment to home mail delivery promise

News Jan 25, 2016 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Canada Post has halted the demise of home delivery, as the Liberals promised during the federal election, but nothing has been said in the past three months about restoration of service to those who lost it over the past two years.

“The verbiage that was used, they created an expectation that they would turn back the process and none of this has happened,” said David Sweet, MP for Flamborough-Glanbrook.

“I think the promise was a political one that they had no intention of fulfilling. I think the evidence is clear a few months later.”

About 36,000 homes on the Mountain and upper Stoney Creek lost home mail delivery last summer.

Filomena Tassi, the Liberal MP for Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas, said her government has taken the initial step — getting a moratorium on the home delivery cut — toward keeping its election promise.

“Our end goal is to provide high quality service at a reasonable price,” she said.

The government will soon begin consulting with the public and Canada Post to determine what should be done, said Tassi.

As far as turning back the clock for communities that lost home mail delivery in the past two years, “You can’t prejudge it at this point,” Tassi said. “We need to reach out to Canadians and determine what the needs are and the best way to respond to those needs.”

When Canada Post announced the plan to halt home delivery, two-thirds of Canadians were already going to a communal box to get their mail, said Sweet. He estimated 80 per cent now make a trip down the street.

Sweet said when the announcement was made it was reasonable to make the cuts, except in rural areas, to keep the Crown corporation viable.

Hamilton Mountain MP Scott Duvall said he doesn’t believe keeping home delivery — and restoring it to those who lost it — would create a two-tier service.

The neighbourhoods which have never had home delivery were designed with that in mind, while putting boxes in older neighbourhoods has been problematic.

Boxes could easily be removed and used in new housing developments, where their locations are built into the subdivision plan, he said.

“We’ll be making sure they fulfill their promise and answer the people about what they are doing to save door-to-door delivery,” said Duvall.

Hamilton MPs question Liberals' commitment to home mail delivery promise

Filomena Tassi says her government will consult with public on Canada Post

News Jan 25, 2016 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Canada Post has halted the demise of home delivery, as the Liberals promised during the federal election, but nothing has been said in the past three months about restoration of service to those who lost it over the past two years.

“The verbiage that was used, they created an expectation that they would turn back the process and none of this has happened,” said David Sweet, MP for Flamborough-Glanbrook.

“I think the promise was a political one that they had no intention of fulfilling. I think the evidence is clear a few months later.”

About 36,000 homes on the Mountain and upper Stoney Creek lost home mail delivery last summer.

“The verbiage that was used, they created an expectation that they would turn back the process and none of this has happened.”

Filomena Tassi, the Liberal MP for Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas, said her government has taken the initial step — getting a moratorium on the home delivery cut — toward keeping its election promise.

“Our end goal is to provide high quality service at a reasonable price,” she said.

The government will soon begin consulting with the public and Canada Post to determine what should be done, said Tassi.

As far as turning back the clock for communities that lost home mail delivery in the past two years, “You can’t prejudge it at this point,” Tassi said. “We need to reach out to Canadians and determine what the needs are and the best way to respond to those needs.”

When Canada Post announced the plan to halt home delivery, two-thirds of Canadians were already going to a communal box to get their mail, said Sweet. He estimated 80 per cent now make a trip down the street.

Sweet said when the announcement was made it was reasonable to make the cuts, except in rural areas, to keep the Crown corporation viable.

Hamilton Mountain MP Scott Duvall said he doesn’t believe keeping home delivery — and restoring it to those who lost it — would create a two-tier service.

The neighbourhoods which have never had home delivery were designed with that in mind, while putting boxes in older neighbourhoods has been problematic.

Boxes could easily be removed and used in new housing developments, where their locations are built into the subdivision plan, he said.

“We’ll be making sure they fulfill their promise and answer the people about what they are doing to save door-to-door delivery,” said Duvall.

Hamilton MPs question Liberals' commitment to home mail delivery promise

Filomena Tassi says her government will consult with public on Canada Post

News Jan 25, 2016 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Canada Post has halted the demise of home delivery, as the Liberals promised during the federal election, but nothing has been said in the past three months about restoration of service to those who lost it over the past two years.

“The verbiage that was used, they created an expectation that they would turn back the process and none of this has happened,” said David Sweet, MP for Flamborough-Glanbrook.

“I think the promise was a political one that they had no intention of fulfilling. I think the evidence is clear a few months later.”

About 36,000 homes on the Mountain and upper Stoney Creek lost home mail delivery last summer.

“The verbiage that was used, they created an expectation that they would turn back the process and none of this has happened.”

Filomena Tassi, the Liberal MP for Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas, said her government has taken the initial step — getting a moratorium on the home delivery cut — toward keeping its election promise.

“Our end goal is to provide high quality service at a reasonable price,” she said.

The government will soon begin consulting with the public and Canada Post to determine what should be done, said Tassi.

As far as turning back the clock for communities that lost home mail delivery in the past two years, “You can’t prejudge it at this point,” Tassi said. “We need to reach out to Canadians and determine what the needs are and the best way to respond to those needs.”

When Canada Post announced the plan to halt home delivery, two-thirds of Canadians were already going to a communal box to get their mail, said Sweet. He estimated 80 per cent now make a trip down the street.

Sweet said when the announcement was made it was reasonable to make the cuts, except in rural areas, to keep the Crown corporation viable.

Hamilton Mountain MP Scott Duvall said he doesn’t believe keeping home delivery — and restoring it to those who lost it — would create a two-tier service.

The neighbourhoods which have never had home delivery were designed with that in mind, while putting boxes in older neighbourhoods has been problematic.

Boxes could easily be removed and used in new housing developments, where their locations are built into the subdivision plan, he said.

“We’ll be making sure they fulfill their promise and answer the people about what they are doing to save door-to-door delivery,” said Duvall.