Auchmar can be sustainable, if capital funds can be raised first

News Jan 21, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

It will cost upwards of $8 million in more capital funding to make Auchmar Estate suitable for public and private use, says city heritage officials.

If the capital funding can be secured, then Ian Kerr-Wilson, manager of museums and heritage said during a presentation of the operations plan for Auchmar to the Heritage Committee and a packed meeting room Jan. 21, it will cost taxpayers about $109,000 to operate the facility in the first year, rising to about $136,485 in the fourth year.

Preliminary figures presented by Kerr-Wilson revealed that Auchmar could earn nearly $65,000 in the first year of operation, and escalate to about $129,500 in the fourth year.

He said considering the bottom line, Auchmar, located on Fennell Avenue and West 5th, could be a sustainable operation.

The idea, said Kerr-Wilson, is to use Auchmar for both public and private uses, such as office meetings, community group use, music festivals, as well as weddings, film shoots, corporate events and workshops.

“We would want a reasonable return on investment,” he said. “Don’t let the private use drive out community use,” said Kerr-Wilson.

The facility would be open year-round, with the public having access to the main house and grounds. The Coach House and Dovecote would be preserved as well, he said.

But the problem is raising the estimated $8 million in capital costs. That money would go towards installing plumbing, electrical and sewer lines; building an elevator and making the structure accessible according to Ontario guidelines;  putting in air conditioning to alleviate the severe heat during the summer; installing fire separation doors; adding parking spaces; renovating the Coach House interior, and complete the interior design and restoration projects. Since 2008, the city has spent $2.5 million in capital funding on Auchmar, while also contributing about $22,000 in annual operating expenses.

Kerr-Wilson said the $8 million capital funding is “is something we have to get our head around. It will be a multi-year project.”

Diane Dent, chair of the Friends of Auchmar, said there is an “underground” network of people ready to help raise money through crowd funding, and applying for grants to keep Auchmar in public hands. She said councillors need to see what can happen when communities preserve buildings. Dent referred to the Bell Gairdner Estate, on Lakeshore Blvd, a private residence that was in disrepair when the City of Mississauga bought and restored it.

“We need to get council to the Bell Gairdner,” she said. “They will have their eyes opened. That is how you convince council.”

City heritage staff will be holding public presentation of the Auchmar operations plan Jan. 28 at the Lister Block starting at 6 p.m.

The report on Auchmar will be presented to council sometime in the second quarter of the year.

 

Auchmar can be sustainable, if capital funds can be raised first

News Jan 21, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

It will cost upwards of $8 million in more capital funding to make Auchmar Estate suitable for public and private use, says city heritage officials.

If the capital funding can be secured, then Ian Kerr-Wilson, manager of museums and heritage said during a presentation of the operations plan for Auchmar to the Heritage Committee and a packed meeting room Jan. 21, it will cost taxpayers about $109,000 to operate the facility in the first year, rising to about $136,485 in the fourth year.

Preliminary figures presented by Kerr-Wilson revealed that Auchmar could earn nearly $65,000 in the first year of operation, and escalate to about $129,500 in the fourth year.

He said considering the bottom line, Auchmar, located on Fennell Avenue and West 5th, could be a sustainable operation.

The idea, said Kerr-Wilson, is to use Auchmar for both public and private uses, such as office meetings, community group use, music festivals, as well as weddings, film shoots, corporate events and workshops.

“We would want a reasonable return on investment,” he said. “Don’t let the private use drive out community use,” said Kerr-Wilson.

The facility would be open year-round, with the public having access to the main house and grounds. The Coach House and Dovecote would be preserved as well, he said.

But the problem is raising the estimated $8 million in capital costs. That money would go towards installing plumbing, electrical and sewer lines; building an elevator and making the structure accessible according to Ontario guidelines;  putting in air conditioning to alleviate the severe heat during the summer; installing fire separation doors; adding parking spaces; renovating the Coach House interior, and complete the interior design and restoration projects. Since 2008, the city has spent $2.5 million in capital funding on Auchmar, while also contributing about $22,000 in annual operating expenses.

Kerr-Wilson said the $8 million capital funding is “is something we have to get our head around. It will be a multi-year project.”

Diane Dent, chair of the Friends of Auchmar, said there is an “underground” network of people ready to help raise money through crowd funding, and applying for grants to keep Auchmar in public hands. She said councillors need to see what can happen when communities preserve buildings. Dent referred to the Bell Gairdner Estate, on Lakeshore Blvd, a private residence that was in disrepair when the City of Mississauga bought and restored it.

“We need to get council to the Bell Gairdner,” she said. “They will have their eyes opened. That is how you convince council.”

City heritage staff will be holding public presentation of the Auchmar operations plan Jan. 28 at the Lister Block starting at 6 p.m.

The report on Auchmar will be presented to council sometime in the second quarter of the year.

 

Auchmar can be sustainable, if capital funds can be raised first

News Jan 21, 2016 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

It will cost upwards of $8 million in more capital funding to make Auchmar Estate suitable for public and private use, says city heritage officials.

If the capital funding can be secured, then Ian Kerr-Wilson, manager of museums and heritage said during a presentation of the operations plan for Auchmar to the Heritage Committee and a packed meeting room Jan. 21, it will cost taxpayers about $109,000 to operate the facility in the first year, rising to about $136,485 in the fourth year.

Preliminary figures presented by Kerr-Wilson revealed that Auchmar could earn nearly $65,000 in the first year of operation, and escalate to about $129,500 in the fourth year.

He said considering the bottom line, Auchmar, located on Fennell Avenue and West 5th, could be a sustainable operation.

The idea, said Kerr-Wilson, is to use Auchmar for both public and private uses, such as office meetings, community group use, music festivals, as well as weddings, film shoots, corporate events and workshops.

“We would want a reasonable return on investment,” he said. “Don’t let the private use drive out community use,” said Kerr-Wilson.

The facility would be open year-round, with the public having access to the main house and grounds. The Coach House and Dovecote would be preserved as well, he said.

But the problem is raising the estimated $8 million in capital costs. That money would go towards installing plumbing, electrical and sewer lines; building an elevator and making the structure accessible according to Ontario guidelines;  putting in air conditioning to alleviate the severe heat during the summer; installing fire separation doors; adding parking spaces; renovating the Coach House interior, and complete the interior design and restoration projects. Since 2008, the city has spent $2.5 million in capital funding on Auchmar, while also contributing about $22,000 in annual operating expenses.

Kerr-Wilson said the $8 million capital funding is “is something we have to get our head around. It will be a multi-year project.”

Diane Dent, chair of the Friends of Auchmar, said there is an “underground” network of people ready to help raise money through crowd funding, and applying for grants to keep Auchmar in public hands. She said councillors need to see what can happen when communities preserve buildings. Dent referred to the Bell Gairdner Estate, on Lakeshore Blvd, a private residence that was in disrepair when the City of Mississauga bought and restored it.

“We need to get council to the Bell Gairdner,” she said. “They will have their eyes opened. That is how you convince council.”

City heritage staff will be holding public presentation of the Auchmar operations plan Jan. 28 at the Lister Block starting at 6 p.m.

The report on Auchmar will be presented to council sometime in the second quarter of the year.