Drones flying inside Mohawk College

News Jan 20, 2016 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Don’t be alarmed if you see something flying around inside one of the gymnasiums or classrooms at Mohawk College’s Fennell campus in the coming weeks.

It’ll just be media or aviation technician students getting a first-hand look at some 21st century technology.

The college has purchased four DJI Phantom 3 drones at a cost of $10,000 and they will be part of the curriculum starting this month.

“Our vision is that we will have students getting instruction in the media side in terms of flying the drones and we’ll also have students in aviation being able to repair and maintain the drones,” said Kurt Muller, associate dean of media and entertainment at Mohawk, who noted the drone instruction has grown out of an applied research and innovation grant from the college last year where Mark Laurie, aviation program coordinator, and himself studied the potential for drones in education.

The grant also enabled a number of instructors at Mohawk to learn how to fly the drones as well as the regulations that govern their use.

Muller said the college sees drones as a valuable tool and drone operating experience will improve their students’ chances of finding a job after graduation.

“Almost every industry you can imagine there is a potential for drones, particularly in media, they are very useful tool,” he said. “Students who have that training and those skills are going to have a competitive advantage in our view over students who don’t.”

Some students will get hands-on training while others will get an overview of drones and how they work.

Tracey Kadish, coordinator/professor of broadcasting-television and media at Mohawk, said third-year broadcasting students were to begin learning about drones once classes resumed this month.

“In a confined area…they will have an indoor flight experience,” said Kadish, who noted the drones will not be operated outdoors.

The battery-powered drones feature four small propellers and are operated by software that can be downloaded to an iPhone or iPad.

They weigh about 1.2 kilograms or three pounds, can fly as high as 6,000 metres or more than 19,000 feet, have a range of a kilometre or just over a half mile and can stay in the air for about 25 minutes.

Each drone comes with a camera that can take high quality video as well as still images.

Kadish, who used to oversee camera operators at the CBC, said a number of television networks are using drones, adding the mini flying machines will revolutionize the way images are recorded.

“We’re going to be able to go to places that we’ve never every been able to go to and capture them,” she said.

Kadish said students will also learn about liability and privacy matters and that the college has legal and insurance approval for the drone instruction.

“We could not offer this in a classroom environment if our legal department wasn’t on-board,” she said.

Scott Kenney, creative photography program coordinator, said future drone use for his students is “absolutely massive” and he’s excited about learning new camera techniques from a bird’s-eye view.

“You’re looking at perspective you’ve never seen before and that’s very exciting,” he said.

Mohawk’s continuing education department was looking to offer an un-manned aircraft ground school this month but the program was cancelled due to lack of enrollment.

Muller said the program will be offered again in the spring.

Drones flying inside Mohawk College

Media and aviation students to learn about electric flyers starting this month

News Jan 20, 2016 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Don’t be alarmed if you see something flying around inside one of the gymnasiums or classrooms at Mohawk College’s Fennell campus in the coming weeks.

It’ll just be media or aviation technician students getting a first-hand look at some 21st century technology.

The college has purchased four DJI Phantom 3 drones at a cost of $10,000 and they will be part of the curriculum starting this month.

“Our vision is that we will have students getting instruction in the media side in terms of flying the drones and we’ll also have students in aviation being able to repair and maintain the drones,” said Kurt Muller, associate dean of media and entertainment at Mohawk, who noted the drone instruction has grown out of an applied research and innovation grant from the college last year where Mark Laurie, aviation program coordinator, and himself studied the potential for drones in education.

The grant also enabled a number of instructors at Mohawk to learn how to fly the drones as well as the regulations that govern their use.

Muller said the college sees drones as a valuable tool and drone operating experience will improve their students’ chances of finding a job after graduation.

“Almost every industry you can imagine there is a potential for drones, particularly in media, they are very useful tool,” he said. “Students who have that training and those skills are going to have a competitive advantage in our view over students who don’t.”

Some students will get hands-on training while others will get an overview of drones and how they work.

Tracey Kadish, coordinator/professor of broadcasting-television and media at Mohawk, said third-year broadcasting students were to begin learning about drones once classes resumed this month.

“In a confined area…they will have an indoor flight experience,” said Kadish, who noted the drones will not be operated outdoors.

The battery-powered drones feature four small propellers and are operated by software that can be downloaded to an iPhone or iPad.

They weigh about 1.2 kilograms or three pounds, can fly as high as 6,000 metres or more than 19,000 feet, have a range of a kilometre or just over a half mile and can stay in the air for about 25 minutes.

Each drone comes with a camera that can take high quality video as well as still images.

Kadish, who used to oversee camera operators at the CBC, said a number of television networks are using drones, adding the mini flying machines will revolutionize the way images are recorded.

“We’re going to be able to go to places that we’ve never every been able to go to and capture them,” she said.

Kadish said students will also learn about liability and privacy matters and that the college has legal and insurance approval for the drone instruction.

“We could not offer this in a classroom environment if our legal department wasn’t on-board,” she said.

Scott Kenney, creative photography program coordinator, said future drone use for his students is “absolutely massive” and he’s excited about learning new camera techniques from a bird’s-eye view.

“You’re looking at perspective you’ve never seen before and that’s very exciting,” he said.

Mohawk’s continuing education department was looking to offer an un-manned aircraft ground school this month but the program was cancelled due to lack of enrollment.

Muller said the program will be offered again in the spring.

Drones flying inside Mohawk College

Media and aviation students to learn about electric flyers starting this month

News Jan 20, 2016 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Don’t be alarmed if you see something flying around inside one of the gymnasiums or classrooms at Mohawk College’s Fennell campus in the coming weeks.

It’ll just be media or aviation technician students getting a first-hand look at some 21st century technology.

The college has purchased four DJI Phantom 3 drones at a cost of $10,000 and they will be part of the curriculum starting this month.

“Our vision is that we will have students getting instruction in the media side in terms of flying the drones and we’ll also have students in aviation being able to repair and maintain the drones,” said Kurt Muller, associate dean of media and entertainment at Mohawk, who noted the drone instruction has grown out of an applied research and innovation grant from the college last year where Mark Laurie, aviation program coordinator, and himself studied the potential for drones in education.

The grant also enabled a number of instructors at Mohawk to learn how to fly the drones as well as the regulations that govern their use.

Muller said the college sees drones as a valuable tool and drone operating experience will improve their students’ chances of finding a job after graduation.

“Almost every industry you can imagine there is a potential for drones, particularly in media, they are very useful tool,” he said. “Students who have that training and those skills are going to have a competitive advantage in our view over students who don’t.”

Some students will get hands-on training while others will get an overview of drones and how they work.

Tracey Kadish, coordinator/professor of broadcasting-television and media at Mohawk, said third-year broadcasting students were to begin learning about drones once classes resumed this month.

“In a confined area…they will have an indoor flight experience,” said Kadish, who noted the drones will not be operated outdoors.

The battery-powered drones feature four small propellers and are operated by software that can be downloaded to an iPhone or iPad.

They weigh about 1.2 kilograms or three pounds, can fly as high as 6,000 metres or more than 19,000 feet, have a range of a kilometre or just over a half mile and can stay in the air for about 25 minutes.

Each drone comes with a camera that can take high quality video as well as still images.

Kadish, who used to oversee camera operators at the CBC, said a number of television networks are using drones, adding the mini flying machines will revolutionize the way images are recorded.

“We’re going to be able to go to places that we’ve never every been able to go to and capture them,” she said.

Kadish said students will also learn about liability and privacy matters and that the college has legal and insurance approval for the drone instruction.

“We could not offer this in a classroom environment if our legal department wasn’t on-board,” she said.

Scott Kenney, creative photography program coordinator, said future drone use for his students is “absolutely massive” and he’s excited about learning new camera techniques from a bird’s-eye view.

“You’re looking at perspective you’ve never seen before and that’s very exciting,” he said.

Mohawk’s continuing education department was looking to offer an un-manned aircraft ground school this month but the program was cancelled due to lack of enrollment.

Muller said the program will be offered again in the spring.