Resident recognized for help with 911 innovation

News Dec 01, 2015 by Michael Gregory Hamilton Spectator

BURLINGTON — A Burlington resident is the recipient of a provincial award for his efforts in getting text-based 911 services for those who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech impairment.

Arthur Rendall was presented with an Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) 10th anniversary Champion Award recently at a city council meeting.

He has also been a member of Burlington's Accessibility Advisory Committee since 2008.

The AODA award, presented to 101 Ontarians, recognizes outstanding individuals who demonstrate leadership, passion and commitment in the promotion of accessibility and inclusiveness in their community.

"As a direct result his tireless efforts, there is now 911 text service from mobile phones for people who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech impairments and that benefits us all," said Mayor Rick Goldring.

Rendall worked closely with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission's (CRTC) Emergency Service Working Group starting in 2008 to come up with the system.

"At the start of the discussions, it was thought that developing such a service would be too expensive, but Arthur did not give up and provided the leadership and drive to make this project a success," said Judi Lytle, the city's accessibility co-ordinator.

In early 2013, the CRTC rolled out the enhancements as a result of Rendall's contributions.

The service is now available across Canada and is being brought to the United States.

Burlington Post

Resident recognized for help with 911 innovation

News Dec 01, 2015 by Michael Gregory Hamilton Spectator

BURLINGTON — A Burlington resident is the recipient of a provincial award for his efforts in getting text-based 911 services for those who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech impairment.

Arthur Rendall was presented with an Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) 10th anniversary Champion Award recently at a city council meeting.

He has also been a member of Burlington's Accessibility Advisory Committee since 2008.

The AODA award, presented to 101 Ontarians, recognizes outstanding individuals who demonstrate leadership, passion and commitment in the promotion of accessibility and inclusiveness in their community.

"As a direct result his tireless efforts, there is now 911 text service from mobile phones for people who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech impairments and that benefits us all," said Mayor Rick Goldring.

Rendall worked closely with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission's (CRTC) Emergency Service Working Group starting in 2008 to come up with the system.

"At the start of the discussions, it was thought that developing such a service would be too expensive, but Arthur did not give up and provided the leadership and drive to make this project a success," said Judi Lytle, the city's accessibility co-ordinator.

In early 2013, the CRTC rolled out the enhancements as a result of Rendall's contributions.

The service is now available across Canada and is being brought to the United States.

Burlington Post

Resident recognized for help with 911 innovation

News Dec 01, 2015 by Michael Gregory Hamilton Spectator

BURLINGTON — A Burlington resident is the recipient of a provincial award for his efforts in getting text-based 911 services for those who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech impairment.

Arthur Rendall was presented with an Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) 10th anniversary Champion Award recently at a city council meeting.

He has also been a member of Burlington's Accessibility Advisory Committee since 2008.

The AODA award, presented to 101 Ontarians, recognizes outstanding individuals who demonstrate leadership, passion and commitment in the promotion of accessibility and inclusiveness in their community.

"As a direct result his tireless efforts, there is now 911 text service from mobile phones for people who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech impairments and that benefits us all," said Mayor Rick Goldring.

Rendall worked closely with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission's (CRTC) Emergency Service Working Group starting in 2008 to come up with the system.

"At the start of the discussions, it was thought that developing such a service would be too expensive, but Arthur did not give up and provided the leadership and drive to make this project a success," said Judi Lytle, the city's accessibility co-ordinator.

In early 2013, the CRTC rolled out the enhancements as a result of Rendall's contributions.

The service is now available across Canada and is being brought to the United States.

Burlington Post