Hamilton’s agricultural committee requests city to keep farmland in Greenbelt

News Nov 29, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s agricultural advisory committee is urging the city to keep an “L-shaped” portion of property along Golf Club Road and Hendershot Road that borders Glanbrook and upper Stoney Creek in the provincial Greenbelt.

In anticipation of what could be a contentious special planning committee meeting Dec. 3 to discuss Hamilton’s Greenbelt land recommendations, members of the agricultural and rural affairs advisory committee last week recommended politicians keep about 243 hectares of land along Golf Club Road and Hendershot Road, which extends to Third Road to the east and Mud Street to the north, within the Greenbelt.

The advisory committee also wanted to keep 323 hectares of land from Twenty Road to Twenty Mile Creek, Highway 56 to Hendershot Road Street in the Greenbelt plan.  City officials say both parcels of land are designated for the future Elfrida growth area, but concede that “some productive lands will be lost.”

City staff is recommending both sections be taken out of the Greenbelt.

“I hope our city people are looking not just 20 years ahead, but they should be looking 50 years ahead,” said Cathy McMaster of Flamborough.

City planning staff is recommending that about 450 hectares of land from Book Road, south of Garner Road Shaver Road between Shaver Road and Fiddler’s Green Road and 570 hectares of land that borders Trinity Church Road, Airport Road East and half-way between Nebo Road and Miles Road be included in the Greenbelt. City planning staff says the land has “limited development” potential.

Members of the committee didn’t make a recommendation whether or not to keep two parcels of land in Winona in the Greenbelt.  Most members were not familiar with the properties, only that both are working farms.

 City staff is recommending that the two parcels of land that total 104 hectares, currently tender fruit farms, with one located on E.D. Smith property be removed from the Greenbelt.

Stoney Creek councillor Brenda Johnson wants the province to agree to remove one of the parcels of land so the city can purchase about 25 acres from E.D. Smith to build a much-needed recreation centre for the area.

The lower Stoney Creek properties are at Glover and Lewis roads, one east and west of Fifty Road, north of Highway 8.

The area has already been designated under the Stoney Creek Urban Boundary Expansion (SCUBE) to accommodate about 15,000 residents over the next 20 years.  Part of the SCUBE plan, the Fruitland-Winona Secondary Plan, is being fought at the Ontario Municipal Board. A hearing is scheduled for early next year.

“We have to make a major effort to keep as much food land in the Greenbelt as possible,” said McMaster. “I hope we have some success.”

Hamilton planning officials provided the province in the spring with its preliminary recommendations on the Greenbelt designation.  The Dec. 3 meeting will finalize the city’s recommendations on the Greenbelt, which was introduced by the province in 2005.

The city has determined not to include the Red Hill Valley in the Greenbelt, or other natural areas, arguing they are governed under local conservation authority.

Flamborough councillor Robert Pasuta said even though the city will make its recommendations to the province, the final decision will be made by the Ontario government.

Final recommendations are expected from the province in early 2016.

“We’re got to protect as much of our farmland as we can,” said Pasuta, who is also a farmer in Flamborough.

The province last year announced it was reviewing a number of Ontario-wide planning documents, including the Greenbelt Plan and the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

Provincial projections have Hamilton growing by about 120,000 people and 50,000 jobs from 2031 to 2041.

 

Hamilton’s agricultural committee requests city to keep farmland in Greenbelt

News Nov 29, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s agricultural advisory committee is urging the city to keep an “L-shaped” portion of property along Golf Club Road and Hendershot Road that borders Glanbrook and upper Stoney Creek in the provincial Greenbelt.

In anticipation of what could be a contentious special planning committee meeting Dec. 3 to discuss Hamilton’s Greenbelt land recommendations, members of the agricultural and rural affairs advisory committee last week recommended politicians keep about 243 hectares of land along Golf Club Road and Hendershot Road, which extends to Third Road to the east and Mud Street to the north, within the Greenbelt.

The advisory committee also wanted to keep 323 hectares of land from Twenty Road to Twenty Mile Creek, Highway 56 to Hendershot Road Street in the Greenbelt plan.  City officials say both parcels of land are designated for the future Elfrida growth area, but concede that “some productive lands will be lost.”

City staff is recommending both sections be taken out of the Greenbelt.

“I hope our city people are looking not just 20 years ahead, but they should be looking 50 years ahead,” said Cathy McMaster of Flamborough.

City planning staff is recommending that about 450 hectares of land from Book Road, south of Garner Road Shaver Road between Shaver Road and Fiddler’s Green Road and 570 hectares of land that borders Trinity Church Road, Airport Road East and half-way between Nebo Road and Miles Road be included in the Greenbelt. City planning staff says the land has “limited development” potential.

Members of the committee didn’t make a recommendation whether or not to keep two parcels of land in Winona in the Greenbelt.  Most members were not familiar with the properties, only that both are working farms.

 City staff is recommending that the two parcels of land that total 104 hectares, currently tender fruit farms, with one located on E.D. Smith property be removed from the Greenbelt.

Stoney Creek councillor Brenda Johnson wants the province to agree to remove one of the parcels of land so the city can purchase about 25 acres from E.D. Smith to build a much-needed recreation centre for the area.

The lower Stoney Creek properties are at Glover and Lewis roads, one east and west of Fifty Road, north of Highway 8.

The area has already been designated under the Stoney Creek Urban Boundary Expansion (SCUBE) to accommodate about 15,000 residents over the next 20 years.  Part of the SCUBE plan, the Fruitland-Winona Secondary Plan, is being fought at the Ontario Municipal Board. A hearing is scheduled for early next year.

“We have to make a major effort to keep as much food land in the Greenbelt as possible,” said McMaster. “I hope we have some success.”

Hamilton planning officials provided the province in the spring with its preliminary recommendations on the Greenbelt designation.  The Dec. 3 meeting will finalize the city’s recommendations on the Greenbelt, which was introduced by the province in 2005.

The city has determined not to include the Red Hill Valley in the Greenbelt, or other natural areas, arguing they are governed under local conservation authority.

Flamborough councillor Robert Pasuta said even though the city will make its recommendations to the province, the final decision will be made by the Ontario government.

Final recommendations are expected from the province in early 2016.

“We’re got to protect as much of our farmland as we can,” said Pasuta, who is also a farmer in Flamborough.

The province last year announced it was reviewing a number of Ontario-wide planning documents, including the Greenbelt Plan and the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

Provincial projections have Hamilton growing by about 120,000 people and 50,000 jobs from 2031 to 2041.

 

Hamilton’s agricultural committee requests city to keep farmland in Greenbelt

News Nov 29, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s agricultural advisory committee is urging the city to keep an “L-shaped” portion of property along Golf Club Road and Hendershot Road that borders Glanbrook and upper Stoney Creek in the provincial Greenbelt.

In anticipation of what could be a contentious special planning committee meeting Dec. 3 to discuss Hamilton’s Greenbelt land recommendations, members of the agricultural and rural affairs advisory committee last week recommended politicians keep about 243 hectares of land along Golf Club Road and Hendershot Road, which extends to Third Road to the east and Mud Street to the north, within the Greenbelt.

The advisory committee also wanted to keep 323 hectares of land from Twenty Road to Twenty Mile Creek, Highway 56 to Hendershot Road Street in the Greenbelt plan.  City officials say both parcels of land are designated for the future Elfrida growth area, but concede that “some productive lands will be lost.”

City staff is recommending both sections be taken out of the Greenbelt.

“I hope our city people are looking not just 20 years ahead, but they should be looking 50 years ahead,” said Cathy McMaster of Flamborough.

City planning staff is recommending that about 450 hectares of land from Book Road, south of Garner Road Shaver Road between Shaver Road and Fiddler’s Green Road and 570 hectares of land that borders Trinity Church Road, Airport Road East and half-way between Nebo Road and Miles Road be included in the Greenbelt. City planning staff says the land has “limited development” potential.

Members of the committee didn’t make a recommendation whether or not to keep two parcels of land in Winona in the Greenbelt.  Most members were not familiar with the properties, only that both are working farms.

 City staff is recommending that the two parcels of land that total 104 hectares, currently tender fruit farms, with one located on E.D. Smith property be removed from the Greenbelt.

Stoney Creek councillor Brenda Johnson wants the province to agree to remove one of the parcels of land so the city can purchase about 25 acres from E.D. Smith to build a much-needed recreation centre for the area.

The lower Stoney Creek properties are at Glover and Lewis roads, one east and west of Fifty Road, north of Highway 8.

The area has already been designated under the Stoney Creek Urban Boundary Expansion (SCUBE) to accommodate about 15,000 residents over the next 20 years.  Part of the SCUBE plan, the Fruitland-Winona Secondary Plan, is being fought at the Ontario Municipal Board. A hearing is scheduled for early next year.

“We have to make a major effort to keep as much food land in the Greenbelt as possible,” said McMaster. “I hope we have some success.”

Hamilton planning officials provided the province in the spring with its preliminary recommendations on the Greenbelt designation.  The Dec. 3 meeting will finalize the city’s recommendations on the Greenbelt, which was introduced by the province in 2005.

The city has determined not to include the Red Hill Valley in the Greenbelt, or other natural areas, arguing they are governed under local conservation authority.

Flamborough councillor Robert Pasuta said even though the city will make its recommendations to the province, the final decision will be made by the Ontario government.

Final recommendations are expected from the province in early 2016.

“We’re got to protect as much of our farmland as we can,” said Pasuta, who is also a farmer in Flamborough.

The province last year announced it was reviewing a number of Ontario-wide planning documents, including the Greenbelt Plan and the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

Provincial projections have Hamilton growing by about 120,000 people and 50,000 jobs from 2031 to 2041.