Dundas Museum, Dundas Business Improvement Area and others team for heritage information panels

News Oct 15, 2015 by Debra Downey Dundas Star News

The first six in a series of information panels detailing downtown Dundas’ colourful history have found a home along King Street.

Representatives who participated in the collaborative project were on hand at Herb Bowes Cleaners yesterday to launch the program aimed at increasing awareness and celebrating the Valley Town’s unique history.

Dundas Museum and Archives curator Kevin Puddister said both the museum and Dundas Valley Historical Society regularly receive queries and comments from residents and visitors alike about the history and heritage of buildings along King Street.

“It is clear that the community is keen to learn more about and celebrate its heritage,” said Puddister.

The Dundas Heritage Information Panels include a thoroughly researched description of the history of the building or block, along with a selection of relevant historical images and artifacts from the museum’s collection.

Herb Bowes Cleaners, located in the Bowes Building at 25-27 King St. W., was once the site of the gateposts and walls of the vast estate of George Rolph, a wealthy lawyer whose property stretched from King to Park streets and into today’s Dundas Driving Park. The land was later sold into lots, and in 1973 the current building was purchased by Herb Bowes. The dry-cleaning business has been in operation since 1948, with Bowes’ son Paul, daughter-in-law Anna and grandson Ken continuing the Bowes legacy.

Puddister said the history of the Bowes Building is just one of the great stories and places in Dundas that will be detailed in heritage information panel program.

“....we are fortunate to have such a well-preserved and cared for downtown core with buildings of numerous eras that help us tell the story of this town,” he said.

Along with Bowes Cleaners, heritage information panels are now on display at Elgin House, 90-96 King St. W., where Vandeputte Law is located; the Music Hall, 98-102 King St. W., home to Espresso Cafe; the Laing Building, currently Heirlooms Bridal Shoppe at 13-21 King St. W.; the Webster-Grafton Building at 2 King St. W., where Strawberry Fields is located; and the Coleman Building at 2 King St. E., home of Thirsty Cactus.

The Dundas Heritage Information Panel Program is supported by with the Dundas museum, historical society, Downtown Dundas Business Improvement Area, McMaster University and Headspring Marketing Design Group’s Walter Pick and Adele Taylor-Pick, who designed the panels.

Judith Morphet, president of the Dundas Valley Historical Society, said, “We are pleased, after much research by the society, assistance from the Dundas museum enthusiastic support from owners, merchants and the Downtown Dundas Business Improvement Area to finally display these panels and tell the stories of early Dundas.”

Dundas Museum, Dundas Business Improvement Area and others team for heritage information panels

News Oct 15, 2015 by Debra Downey Dundas Star News

The first six in a series of information panels detailing downtown Dundas’ colourful history have found a home along King Street.

Representatives who participated in the collaborative project were on hand at Herb Bowes Cleaners yesterday to launch the program aimed at increasing awareness and celebrating the Valley Town’s unique history.

Dundas Museum and Archives curator Kevin Puddister said both the museum and Dundas Valley Historical Society regularly receive queries and comments from residents and visitors alike about the history and heritage of buildings along King Street.

“It is clear that the community is keen to learn more about and celebrate its heritage,” said Puddister.

“....we are fortunate to have such a well-preserved and cared for downtown core with buildings of numerous eras that help us tell the story of this town.”

The Dundas Heritage Information Panels include a thoroughly researched description of the history of the building or block, along with a selection of relevant historical images and artifacts from the museum’s collection.

Herb Bowes Cleaners, located in the Bowes Building at 25-27 King St. W., was once the site of the gateposts and walls of the vast estate of George Rolph, a wealthy lawyer whose property stretched from King to Park streets and into today’s Dundas Driving Park. The land was later sold into lots, and in 1973 the current building was purchased by Herb Bowes. The dry-cleaning business has been in operation since 1948, with Bowes’ son Paul, daughter-in-law Anna and grandson Ken continuing the Bowes legacy.

Puddister said the history of the Bowes Building is just one of the great stories and places in Dundas that will be detailed in heritage information panel program.

“....we are fortunate to have such a well-preserved and cared for downtown core with buildings of numerous eras that help us tell the story of this town,” he said.

Along with Bowes Cleaners, heritage information panels are now on display at Elgin House, 90-96 King St. W., where Vandeputte Law is located; the Music Hall, 98-102 King St. W., home to Espresso Cafe; the Laing Building, currently Heirlooms Bridal Shoppe at 13-21 King St. W.; the Webster-Grafton Building at 2 King St. W., where Strawberry Fields is located; and the Coleman Building at 2 King St. E., home of Thirsty Cactus.

The Dundas Heritage Information Panel Program is supported by with the Dundas museum, historical society, Downtown Dundas Business Improvement Area, McMaster University and Headspring Marketing Design Group’s Walter Pick and Adele Taylor-Pick, who designed the panels.

Judith Morphet, president of the Dundas Valley Historical Society, said, “We are pleased, after much research by the society, assistance from the Dundas museum enthusiastic support from owners, merchants and the Downtown Dundas Business Improvement Area to finally display these panels and tell the stories of early Dundas.”

Dundas Museum, Dundas Business Improvement Area and others team for heritage information panels

News Oct 15, 2015 by Debra Downey Dundas Star News

The first six in a series of information panels detailing downtown Dundas’ colourful history have found a home along King Street.

Representatives who participated in the collaborative project were on hand at Herb Bowes Cleaners yesterday to launch the program aimed at increasing awareness and celebrating the Valley Town’s unique history.

Dundas Museum and Archives curator Kevin Puddister said both the museum and Dundas Valley Historical Society regularly receive queries and comments from residents and visitors alike about the history and heritage of buildings along King Street.

“It is clear that the community is keen to learn more about and celebrate its heritage,” said Puddister.

“....we are fortunate to have such a well-preserved and cared for downtown core with buildings of numerous eras that help us tell the story of this town.”

The Dundas Heritage Information Panels include a thoroughly researched description of the history of the building or block, along with a selection of relevant historical images and artifacts from the museum’s collection.

Herb Bowes Cleaners, located in the Bowes Building at 25-27 King St. W., was once the site of the gateposts and walls of the vast estate of George Rolph, a wealthy lawyer whose property stretched from King to Park streets and into today’s Dundas Driving Park. The land was later sold into lots, and in 1973 the current building was purchased by Herb Bowes. The dry-cleaning business has been in operation since 1948, with Bowes’ son Paul, daughter-in-law Anna and grandson Ken continuing the Bowes legacy.

Puddister said the history of the Bowes Building is just one of the great stories and places in Dundas that will be detailed in heritage information panel program.

“....we are fortunate to have such a well-preserved and cared for downtown core with buildings of numerous eras that help us tell the story of this town,” he said.

Along with Bowes Cleaners, heritage information panels are now on display at Elgin House, 90-96 King St. W., where Vandeputte Law is located; the Music Hall, 98-102 King St. W., home to Espresso Cafe; the Laing Building, currently Heirlooms Bridal Shoppe at 13-21 King St. W.; the Webster-Grafton Building at 2 King St. W., where Strawberry Fields is located; and the Coleman Building at 2 King St. E., home of Thirsty Cactus.

The Dundas Heritage Information Panel Program is supported by with the Dundas museum, historical society, Downtown Dundas Business Improvement Area, McMaster University and Headspring Marketing Design Group’s Walter Pick and Adele Taylor-Pick, who designed the panels.

Judith Morphet, president of the Dundas Valley Historical Society, said, “We are pleased, after much research by the society, assistance from the Dundas museum enthusiastic support from owners, merchants and the Downtown Dundas Business Improvement Area to finally display these panels and tell the stories of early Dundas.”