Last stand in the people of Hamilton vs. Canada Post

News Jul 18, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

A couple minutes before 7 o’clock this morning, Henry Evans-Tenbrinke and Ken Stone pulled up in front of three cement pedestals on East 34th Street at Brucedale Avenue and got their lawn chairs out.

They say they will sit there until Monday to stop a three Canada Post super mailboxes from being installed at the location.

“As long as necessary,” said Evans-Tenbrinke.

Home mail delivery for about 36,000 households on Hamilton Mountain and upper Stoney Creek ended Friday. Starting Monday, those residents will have to trek to communal boxes to pick up their letters, flyers and packages.

But first, there are still several super mailbox sites that must be set up. A Canada Post spokesman said earlier this week contractors for the Crown corporation will work through the weekend if necessary to get boxes in place for the transition.

“We’re going to try to prevent them from meeting their deadline,” said Stone.

On Thursday, Rick Davidson was arrested at the same site for trying to block workers from putting in the cement pedestals.

Evans-Tenbrinke and Stone say police went too far in removing him from his protest, especially while the city is still battling Canada Post in the courts over the issue. The city lost its initial bid to have Canada Post forced to comply with a new bylaw requiring building permits and a $200 fee per mailbox installation site.

“Why are the police interfering with this when it’s a matter before the courts?” said Stone. “For 20 days we sat over there (pointing down Brucedale to where Evans-Tenbrinke held a sit-in in May to block an installation) and the cops said, ‘You have every right to protest peacefully.’ ”

A Hamilton police officer stopped to chat with the two men not long after they set up on East 34th. Evans-Tenbrinke and Stone said while they expect more residents to come out, their plan is for a peaceful protest.

Last stand in the people of Hamilton vs. Canada Post

Sit-in to protest super mailbox installation

News Jul 18, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

A couple minutes before 7 o’clock this morning, Henry Evans-Tenbrinke and Ken Stone pulled up in front of three cement pedestals on East 34th Street at Brucedale Avenue and got their lawn chairs out.

They say they will sit there until Monday to stop a three Canada Post super mailboxes from being installed at the location.

“As long as necessary,” said Evans-Tenbrinke.

Home mail delivery for about 36,000 households on Hamilton Mountain and upper Stoney Creek ended Friday. Starting Monday, those residents will have to trek to communal boxes to pick up their letters, flyers and packages.

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But first, there are still several super mailbox sites that must be set up. A Canada Post spokesman said earlier this week contractors for the Crown corporation will work through the weekend if necessary to get boxes in place for the transition.

“We’re going to try to prevent them from meeting their deadline,” said Stone.

On Thursday, Rick Davidson was arrested at the same site for trying to block workers from putting in the cement pedestals.

Evans-Tenbrinke and Stone say police went too far in removing him from his protest, especially while the city is still battling Canada Post in the courts over the issue. The city lost its initial bid to have Canada Post forced to comply with a new bylaw requiring building permits and a $200 fee per mailbox installation site.

“Why are the police interfering with this when it’s a matter before the courts?” said Stone. “For 20 days we sat over there (pointing down Brucedale to where Evans-Tenbrinke held a sit-in in May to block an installation) and the cops said, ‘You have every right to protest peacefully.’ ”

A Hamilton police officer stopped to chat with the two men not long after they set up on East 34th. Evans-Tenbrinke and Stone said while they expect more residents to come out, their plan is for a peaceful protest.

Last stand in the people of Hamilton vs. Canada Post

Sit-in to protest super mailbox installation

News Jul 18, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

A couple minutes before 7 o’clock this morning, Henry Evans-Tenbrinke and Ken Stone pulled up in front of three cement pedestals on East 34th Street at Brucedale Avenue and got their lawn chairs out.

They say they will sit there until Monday to stop a three Canada Post super mailboxes from being installed at the location.

“As long as necessary,” said Evans-Tenbrinke.

Home mail delivery for about 36,000 households on Hamilton Mountain and upper Stoney Creek ended Friday. Starting Monday, those residents will have to trek to communal boxes to pick up their letters, flyers and packages.

Related Content

But first, there are still several super mailbox sites that must be set up. A Canada Post spokesman said earlier this week contractors for the Crown corporation will work through the weekend if necessary to get boxes in place for the transition.

“We’re going to try to prevent them from meeting their deadline,” said Stone.

On Thursday, Rick Davidson was arrested at the same site for trying to block workers from putting in the cement pedestals.

Evans-Tenbrinke and Stone say police went too far in removing him from his protest, especially while the city is still battling Canada Post in the courts over the issue. The city lost its initial bid to have Canada Post forced to comply with a new bylaw requiring building permits and a $200 fee per mailbox installation site.

“Why are the police interfering with this when it’s a matter before the courts?” said Stone. “For 20 days we sat over there (pointing down Brucedale to where Evans-Tenbrinke held a sit-in in May to block an installation) and the cops said, ‘You have every right to protest peacefully.’ ”

A Hamilton police officer stopped to chat with the two men not long after they set up on East 34th. Evans-Tenbrinke and Stone said while they expect more residents to come out, their plan is for a peaceful protest.