Two Hamilton Mountain parks to get security cameras

News Jul 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Security cameras are being installed in two east Mountain parks as part of a pilot project to curb graffiti and other vandalism.

Ward 6 councillor Tom Jackson and city staff are meeting on site next week to determine the site for one camera at each park.

The move come after numerous complaints from residents living next to the parks about graffiti on the city side of their wooden fences. Residents said they felt victimized twice because a city bylaw requires them to remove the paint or face a fine.

Installation of the cameras could be done by month’s end, said Jackson. Anti-graffiti paint, which causes spray paint to drip and is easier to clean, will also be applied to fences where a property owner approves.

A third deterrent known as fedging — hedges that create a fence-like barrier — will be planted at the request of two homeowners. At the first public meeting last year, the use of willow whips to block fences and deter spraypainting vandals was a popular idea, but cameras were the preferred option at a meeting in March.

The cameras will be aimed at the fence line without peering into backyards, said Jackson. He said he felt the cameras could also deter other vandalism at the parks.

“It started out as a graffiti-driven initiative, but hopefully it will be an ever greater benefit across the entire public area,” he said.

Jackson said the pilot project, if successful, could be implemented at other parks in the city.

Two Hamilton Mountain parks to get security cameras

Attempt to stop graffiti and other vandalism

News Jul 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Security cameras are being installed in two east Mountain parks as part of a pilot project to curb graffiti and other vandalism.

Ward 6 councillor Tom Jackson and city staff are meeting on site next week to determine the site for one camera at each park.

The move come after numerous complaints from residents living next to the parks about graffiti on the city side of their wooden fences. Residents said they felt victimized twice because a city bylaw requires them to remove the paint or face a fine.

Installation of the cameras could be done by month’s end, said Jackson. Anti-graffiti paint, which causes spray paint to drip and is easier to clean, will also be applied to fences where a property owner approves.

A third deterrent known as fedging — hedges that create a fence-like barrier — will be planted at the request of two homeowners. At the first public meeting last year, the use of willow whips to block fences and deter spraypainting vandals was a popular idea, but cameras were the preferred option at a meeting in March.

The cameras will be aimed at the fence line without peering into backyards, said Jackson. He said he felt the cameras could also deter other vandalism at the parks.

“It started out as a graffiti-driven initiative, but hopefully it will be an ever greater benefit across the entire public area,” he said.

Jackson said the pilot project, if successful, could be implemented at other parks in the city.

Two Hamilton Mountain parks to get security cameras

Attempt to stop graffiti and other vandalism

News Jul 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Security cameras are being installed in two east Mountain parks as part of a pilot project to curb graffiti and other vandalism.

Ward 6 councillor Tom Jackson and city staff are meeting on site next week to determine the site for one camera at each park.

The move come after numerous complaints from residents living next to the parks about graffiti on the city side of their wooden fences. Residents said they felt victimized twice because a city bylaw requires them to remove the paint or face a fine.

Installation of the cameras could be done by month’s end, said Jackson. Anti-graffiti paint, which causes spray paint to drip and is easier to clean, will also be applied to fences where a property owner approves.

A third deterrent known as fedging — hedges that create a fence-like barrier — will be planted at the request of two homeowners. At the first public meeting last year, the use of willow whips to block fences and deter spraypainting vandals was a popular idea, but cameras were the preferred option at a meeting in March.

The cameras will be aimed at the fence line without peering into backyards, said Jackson. He said he felt the cameras could also deter other vandalism at the parks.

“It started out as a graffiti-driven initiative, but hopefully it will be an ever greater benefit across the entire public area,” he said.

Jackson said the pilot project, if successful, could be implemented at other parks in the city.