Hamilton Children’s Museum getting ready for December opening

News Jul 03, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

The structural work at Hamilton Children’s Museum is done and now it’s just a matter of redecorating and setting up new displays.

A grand reopening will be held in December, says Ian Kerr-Wilson, the city’s manager of museums.

The museum was closed July 22, 2013 after a routine inspection which found the building was structurally unsound. Repairs began last fall.

The building, a two-storey brick house built in the the 1800s at 1072 Main St. East, was not made to withstand the traffic it gets as a museum.

“Imagine 30,000 people a year walking through your living room and how long it would last,” says Kerr-Wilson.

As part of making the building safe for use again as a museum, the ground floor now sits on steel I-beams.

“It’s almost freestanding from the walls and the foundation,” says Kerr-Wilson. “That’s what was necessary in order to provide a safe floor.”

“It is certainly very, very structurally secure … and for the first time in a long time, the floors are level.”

The layout of the museum will be generally the same as before, says Kerr-Wilson. The doorways will be wider and the exhibits will mostly be new.

“Very little of the material will come back,” he says.

Among the new attractions will be a big ship in the main room and a high-activity “build it” area.

Hamilton Children’s Museum getting ready for December opening

Structural repairs done, new exhibits being installed

News Jul 03, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

The structural work at Hamilton Children’s Museum is done and now it’s just a matter of redecorating and setting up new displays.

A grand reopening will be held in December, says Ian Kerr-Wilson, the city’s manager of museums.

The museum was closed July 22, 2013 after a routine inspection which found the building was structurally unsound. Repairs began last fall.

The building, a two-storey brick house built in the the 1800s at 1072 Main St. East, was not made to withstand the traffic it gets as a museum.

“Imagine 30,000 people a year walking through your living room and how long it would last,” says Kerr-Wilson.

As part of making the building safe for use again as a museum, the ground floor now sits on steel I-beams.

“It’s almost freestanding from the walls and the foundation,” says Kerr-Wilson. “That’s what was necessary in order to provide a safe floor.”

“It is certainly very, very structurally secure … and for the first time in a long time, the floors are level.”

The layout of the museum will be generally the same as before, says Kerr-Wilson. The doorways will be wider and the exhibits will mostly be new.

“Very little of the material will come back,” he says.

Among the new attractions will be a big ship in the main room and a high-activity “build it” area.

Hamilton Children’s Museum getting ready for December opening

Structural repairs done, new exhibits being installed

News Jul 03, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

The structural work at Hamilton Children’s Museum is done and now it’s just a matter of redecorating and setting up new displays.

A grand reopening will be held in December, says Ian Kerr-Wilson, the city’s manager of museums.

The museum was closed July 22, 2013 after a routine inspection which found the building was structurally unsound. Repairs began last fall.

The building, a two-storey brick house built in the the 1800s at 1072 Main St. East, was not made to withstand the traffic it gets as a museum.

“Imagine 30,000 people a year walking through your living room and how long it would last,” says Kerr-Wilson.

As part of making the building safe for use again as a museum, the ground floor now sits on steel I-beams.

“It’s almost freestanding from the walls and the foundation,” says Kerr-Wilson. “That’s what was necessary in order to provide a safe floor.”

“It is certainly very, very structurally secure … and for the first time in a long time, the floors are level.”

The layout of the museum will be generally the same as before, says Kerr-Wilson. The doorways will be wider and the exhibits will mostly be new.

“Very little of the material will come back,” he says.

Among the new attractions will be a big ship in the main room and a high-activity “build it” area.