Cricket cages up and running at Lake Avenue Elementary School

News Jun 17, 2015 by Laura Lennie Stoney Creek News

An area for practising and trying out the game of wickets and stumps is now in play at Lake Avenue Elementary School.

Two cricket cages were officially opened on June 11 on the grounds of the school at 157 Lake Ave. N. Local cricket club and community members, as well as city and public school board representatives were on hand to celebrate the opening, which has been about six years in the making.

“This is going to be really good for this area; I know there’s a lot of kids that are interested in cricket who live in this community,” Crescent Cricket Club president Naseer Malik said, adding 95 per cent of the kids who play for the club are from the Riverdale neighbourhood. “My hope is to see more cricket cages opened at schools. The plan is to get more kids interested in the sport, so we can grow it from the grassroots.”

Ward 5 councillor Chad Collins began looking into a practice cricket facility for the neighbourhood in 2009, after he found some kids trying to play the sport against the wall of a school in the area one evening.

“I started talking to them about what they’d like to see on the grounds here and they said, ‘We’d love to see something to do with cricket,’” he said. “That’s representative, certainly, of the population that’s here in Riverdale. We have people coming here from all over the world where cricket is a popular sport.”

The Royal Bank donated $25,000 for the cricket cages in 2010.

The project was delayed, though, after talks between the school board and city slowed due to staff turnover on both ends.

The board approved the cricket cages in 2012. It then entered into a shared-use agreement that would see the city build and maintain the cages.

“The bank funding certainly helped us,” Collins said. “Then it was just the logistics of trying to get a legal agreement between the board and city that would seek to understand who was going to maintain the facility once it was installed. Basically, it came down to all of those things that have to happen behind the scenes apart from the planning and construction.”

Collins admitted there were days through the process where he didn’t know whether the cricket cages were going to happen.

The city also ended up kicking in about $10,000 to see the cages through construction, he said.

“We finally got it done and it wouldn’t have happened without the partnerships we had,” Collins said, adding local cricket clubs, the community and area trustee and public school board chair Todd White all played an instrumental role. “Now here we are today, looking at something that I know is going to be extensively used. I know that the kids in the area have been itching to get the keys to open it up and use it, and so I’m happy.”

White said he’s also very excited about the project.

“This has been several years in the works,” he said. “There’s no coincidence that finally the work between the city, school board and other partners are finally coming to fruition. We’re doing a lot of great work across the entire city – we’re building schools, community centres – this is just another example of the amazing recreational opportunities that we’re perusing, so I’m very happy to see it finally open.”

White said the shared-use agreement gives the board exclusive use of the cricket cages between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on school days.

“The school and our classes have first dibs to use the facility,” White said. “It really does benefit the programming and opportunity through our gym classes to use the facility and learn something about cricket within our curriculum. And then after hours, it’s open to anyone who would like to use it.”

Crescent Cricket Club member Nicole Gallagher, who was a member of the national cricket women’s team in 2010, said the cages will go a long way in terms of introducing youth to the sport.

“It’s really nice to see things like this being implemented to grow cricket even more and I’m hoping a lot of kids will get involved in the sport,” the 24-year-old said. “I’m also hoping more girls will take up cricket too. The passion is there with the girls that I’ve known throughout the sport, so this is a great way to get more girls interested in the sport as well.”

Cricket cages up and running at Lake Avenue Elementary School

News Jun 17, 2015 by Laura Lennie Stoney Creek News

An area for practising and trying out the game of wickets and stumps is now in play at Lake Avenue Elementary School.

Two cricket cages were officially opened on June 11 on the grounds of the school at 157 Lake Ave. N. Local cricket club and community members, as well as city and public school board representatives were on hand to celebrate the opening, which has been about six years in the making.

“This is going to be really good for this area; I know there’s a lot of kids that are interested in cricket who live in this community,” Crescent Cricket Club president Naseer Malik said, adding 95 per cent of the kids who play for the club are from the Riverdale neighbourhood. “My hope is to see more cricket cages opened at schools. The plan is to get more kids interested in the sport, so we can grow it from the grassroots.”

Ward 5 councillor Chad Collins began looking into a practice cricket facility for the neighbourhood in 2009, after he found some kids trying to play the sport against the wall of a school in the area one evening.

“I started talking to them about what they’d like to see on the grounds here and they said, ‘We’d love to see something to do with cricket,’” he said. “That’s representative, certainly, of the population that’s here in Riverdale. We have people coming here from all over the world where cricket is a popular sport.”

The Royal Bank donated $25,000 for the cricket cages in 2010.

The project was delayed, though, after talks between the school board and city slowed due to staff turnover on both ends.

The board approved the cricket cages in 2012. It then entered into a shared-use agreement that would see the city build and maintain the cages.

“The bank funding certainly helped us,” Collins said. “Then it was just the logistics of trying to get a legal agreement between the board and city that would seek to understand who was going to maintain the facility once it was installed. Basically, it came down to all of those things that have to happen behind the scenes apart from the planning and construction.”

Collins admitted there were days through the process where he didn’t know whether the cricket cages were going to happen.

The city also ended up kicking in about $10,000 to see the cages through construction, he said.

“We finally got it done and it wouldn’t have happened without the partnerships we had,” Collins said, adding local cricket clubs, the community and area trustee and public school board chair Todd White all played an instrumental role. “Now here we are today, looking at something that I know is going to be extensively used. I know that the kids in the area have been itching to get the keys to open it up and use it, and so I’m happy.”

White said he’s also very excited about the project.

“This has been several years in the works,” he said. “There’s no coincidence that finally the work between the city, school board and other partners are finally coming to fruition. We’re doing a lot of great work across the entire city – we’re building schools, community centres – this is just another example of the amazing recreational opportunities that we’re perusing, so I’m very happy to see it finally open.”

White said the shared-use agreement gives the board exclusive use of the cricket cages between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on school days.

“The school and our classes have first dibs to use the facility,” White said. “It really does benefit the programming and opportunity through our gym classes to use the facility and learn something about cricket within our curriculum. And then after hours, it’s open to anyone who would like to use it.”

Crescent Cricket Club member Nicole Gallagher, who was a member of the national cricket women’s team in 2010, said the cages will go a long way in terms of introducing youth to the sport.

“It’s really nice to see things like this being implemented to grow cricket even more and I’m hoping a lot of kids will get involved in the sport,” the 24-year-old said. “I’m also hoping more girls will take up cricket too. The passion is there with the girls that I’ve known throughout the sport, so this is a great way to get more girls interested in the sport as well.”

Cricket cages up and running at Lake Avenue Elementary School

News Jun 17, 2015 by Laura Lennie Stoney Creek News

An area for practising and trying out the game of wickets and stumps is now in play at Lake Avenue Elementary School.

Two cricket cages were officially opened on June 11 on the grounds of the school at 157 Lake Ave. N. Local cricket club and community members, as well as city and public school board representatives were on hand to celebrate the opening, which has been about six years in the making.

“This is going to be really good for this area; I know there’s a lot of kids that are interested in cricket who live in this community,” Crescent Cricket Club president Naseer Malik said, adding 95 per cent of the kids who play for the club are from the Riverdale neighbourhood. “My hope is to see more cricket cages opened at schools. The plan is to get more kids interested in the sport, so we can grow it from the grassroots.”

Ward 5 councillor Chad Collins began looking into a practice cricket facility for the neighbourhood in 2009, after he found some kids trying to play the sport against the wall of a school in the area one evening.

“I started talking to them about what they’d like to see on the grounds here and they said, ‘We’d love to see something to do with cricket,’” he said. “That’s representative, certainly, of the population that’s here in Riverdale. We have people coming here from all over the world where cricket is a popular sport.”

The Royal Bank donated $25,000 for the cricket cages in 2010.

The project was delayed, though, after talks between the school board and city slowed due to staff turnover on both ends.

The board approved the cricket cages in 2012. It then entered into a shared-use agreement that would see the city build and maintain the cages.

“The bank funding certainly helped us,” Collins said. “Then it was just the logistics of trying to get a legal agreement between the board and city that would seek to understand who was going to maintain the facility once it was installed. Basically, it came down to all of those things that have to happen behind the scenes apart from the planning and construction.”

Collins admitted there were days through the process where he didn’t know whether the cricket cages were going to happen.

The city also ended up kicking in about $10,000 to see the cages through construction, he said.

“We finally got it done and it wouldn’t have happened without the partnerships we had,” Collins said, adding local cricket clubs, the community and area trustee and public school board chair Todd White all played an instrumental role. “Now here we are today, looking at something that I know is going to be extensively used. I know that the kids in the area have been itching to get the keys to open it up and use it, and so I’m happy.”

White said he’s also very excited about the project.

“This has been several years in the works,” he said. “There’s no coincidence that finally the work between the city, school board and other partners are finally coming to fruition. We’re doing a lot of great work across the entire city – we’re building schools, community centres – this is just another example of the amazing recreational opportunities that we’re perusing, so I’m very happy to see it finally open.”

White said the shared-use agreement gives the board exclusive use of the cricket cages between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on school days.

“The school and our classes have first dibs to use the facility,” White said. “It really does benefit the programming and opportunity through our gym classes to use the facility and learn something about cricket within our curriculum. And then after hours, it’s open to anyone who would like to use it.”

Crescent Cricket Club member Nicole Gallagher, who was a member of the national cricket women’s team in 2010, said the cages will go a long way in terms of introducing youth to the sport.

“It’s really nice to see things like this being implemented to grow cricket even more and I’m hoping a lot of kids will get involved in the sport,” the 24-year-old said. “I’m also hoping more girls will take up cricket too. The passion is there with the girls that I’ve known throughout the sport, so this is a great way to get more girls interested in the sport as well.”