Board vows to go it alone on Greensville school

News Jun 16, 2015 by Richard Leitner Dundas Star News

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board is promising to rebuild Greensville Elementary School with or without provincial help.

Despite being turned down for funding earlier this year, trustees are making the 350-seat school their top new capital priority as a result of commitments by the city to build an adjoining recreation centre and library.

The Ministry of Education has offered $2.5 million for an addition to the area’s other elementary school, Spencer Valley, but only if Greensville is closed.

Trustees want to apply that money to the new $8.4-million school, which may also include a childcare centre, and are asking the ministry to fund the balance, arguing the project aligns with the province’s push for schools to become community hubs.

“If that’s not a community hub, I don’t know what is,” said Greg Van Geffen, the area’s trustee. “This is a good plan. It makes good sense, it’s good for the community, it’s being very responsible with taxpayers’ money.”

If all goes as planned, the school will open in September 2017 and include a 3,800-square-foot rec centre and 3,400-square-foot library.

Board chair Todd White said he’s not concerned trustees will hurt their case for full funding by signaling a willingness to go it alone if necessary by using money from the sale of surplus school properties.

He said they took the same approach on new high schools being built in the Pan Am district and on the south Mountain, and received full funding from the ministry after both were underway.

“We’ve always had, in many cases, Plan A, Plan B, Plan C, and it’s this dual approach where we plan to do it if needed,” White said. “Getting ministry funding, then, is bonus.”

The project stems from an accommodation review in west Flamborough that led to a decision last June to close Greensville, Spencer Valley, Dr. John Seaton and Beverly Central schools in return for new Beverly and Greensville schools.

The province earlier this year granted $7.5 million for the new Beverly school, to be built by the Beverly Community Centre, but only offered money for the Spencer Valley addition, which had been trustees’ Plan B.

Treasurer Stacey Zucker said the board expects to have about $16.5 million in property sale proceeds by the end of this year, although there are several projects vying for that cash.

She said the future sale of Seaton, Spencer Valley and Beverly Central will also generate money that can go toward the new Greensville school if necessary.

While the board can submit up to eight projects for ministry funding, trustees have only put the Greensville school and a new JK-to-8 school in Glanbrook on this year’s wish list.

The modest request reflects its success in landing $100 million over the past three years, including for the two new high schools, a new elementary school in the Ancaster Meadowlands, and additions to Saltfleet District High and Cootes Paradise Elementary School.

Board vows to go it alone on Greensville school

Trustees to resubmit case for provincial funding

News Jun 16, 2015 by Richard Leitner Dundas Star News

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board is promising to rebuild Greensville Elementary School with or without provincial help.

Despite being turned down for funding earlier this year, trustees are making the 350-seat school their top new capital priority as a result of commitments by the city to build an adjoining recreation centre and library.

The Ministry of Education has offered $2.5 million for an addition to the area’s other elementary school, Spencer Valley, but only if Greensville is closed.

Trustees want to apply that money to the new $8.4-million school, which may also include a childcare centre, and are asking the ministry to fund the balance, arguing the project aligns with the province’s push for schools to become community hubs.

“This is a good plan. It makes good sense, it’s good for the community, it’s being very responsible with taxpayers’ money.”

“If that’s not a community hub, I don’t know what is,” said Greg Van Geffen, the area’s trustee. “This is a good plan. It makes good sense, it’s good for the community, it’s being very responsible with taxpayers’ money.”

If all goes as planned, the school will open in September 2017 and include a 3,800-square-foot rec centre and 3,400-square-foot library.

Board chair Todd White said he’s not concerned trustees will hurt their case for full funding by signaling a willingness to go it alone if necessary by using money from the sale of surplus school properties.

He said they took the same approach on new high schools being built in the Pan Am district and on the south Mountain, and received full funding from the ministry after both were underway.

“We’ve always had, in many cases, Plan A, Plan B, Plan C, and it’s this dual approach where we plan to do it if needed,” White said. “Getting ministry funding, then, is bonus.”

The project stems from an accommodation review in west Flamborough that led to a decision last June to close Greensville, Spencer Valley, Dr. John Seaton and Beverly Central schools in return for new Beverly and Greensville schools.

The province earlier this year granted $7.5 million for the new Beverly school, to be built by the Beverly Community Centre, but only offered money for the Spencer Valley addition, which had been trustees’ Plan B.

Treasurer Stacey Zucker said the board expects to have about $16.5 million in property sale proceeds by the end of this year, although there are several projects vying for that cash.

She said the future sale of Seaton, Spencer Valley and Beverly Central will also generate money that can go toward the new Greensville school if necessary.

While the board can submit up to eight projects for ministry funding, trustees have only put the Greensville school and a new JK-to-8 school in Glanbrook on this year’s wish list.

The modest request reflects its success in landing $100 million over the past three years, including for the two new high schools, a new elementary school in the Ancaster Meadowlands, and additions to Saltfleet District High and Cootes Paradise Elementary School.

Board vows to go it alone on Greensville school

Trustees to resubmit case for provincial funding

News Jun 16, 2015 by Richard Leitner Dundas Star News

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board is promising to rebuild Greensville Elementary School with or without provincial help.

Despite being turned down for funding earlier this year, trustees are making the 350-seat school their top new capital priority as a result of commitments by the city to build an adjoining recreation centre and library.

The Ministry of Education has offered $2.5 million for an addition to the area’s other elementary school, Spencer Valley, but only if Greensville is closed.

Trustees want to apply that money to the new $8.4-million school, which may also include a childcare centre, and are asking the ministry to fund the balance, arguing the project aligns with the province’s push for schools to become community hubs.

“This is a good plan. It makes good sense, it’s good for the community, it’s being very responsible with taxpayers’ money.”

“If that’s not a community hub, I don’t know what is,” said Greg Van Geffen, the area’s trustee. “This is a good plan. It makes good sense, it’s good for the community, it’s being very responsible with taxpayers’ money.”

If all goes as planned, the school will open in September 2017 and include a 3,800-square-foot rec centre and 3,400-square-foot library.

Board chair Todd White said he’s not concerned trustees will hurt their case for full funding by signaling a willingness to go it alone if necessary by using money from the sale of surplus school properties.

He said they took the same approach on new high schools being built in the Pan Am district and on the south Mountain, and received full funding from the ministry after both were underway.

“We’ve always had, in many cases, Plan A, Plan B, Plan C, and it’s this dual approach where we plan to do it if needed,” White said. “Getting ministry funding, then, is bonus.”

The project stems from an accommodation review in west Flamborough that led to a decision last June to close Greensville, Spencer Valley, Dr. John Seaton and Beverly Central schools in return for new Beverly and Greensville schools.

The province earlier this year granted $7.5 million for the new Beverly school, to be built by the Beverly Community Centre, but only offered money for the Spencer Valley addition, which had been trustees’ Plan B.

Treasurer Stacey Zucker said the board expects to have about $16.5 million in property sale proceeds by the end of this year, although there are several projects vying for that cash.

She said the future sale of Seaton, Spencer Valley and Beverly Central will also generate money that can go toward the new Greensville school if necessary.

While the board can submit up to eight projects for ministry funding, trustees have only put the Greensville school and a new JK-to-8 school in Glanbrook on this year’s wish list.

The modest request reflects its success in landing $100 million over the past three years, including for the two new high schools, a new elementary school in the Ancaster Meadowlands, and additions to Saltfleet District High and Cootes Paradise Elementary School.