Hamilton students to get ‘abbreviated’ report cards

News Jun 16, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Unlike their counterparts in Toronto, Halton, York and Peel districts, Hamilton public elementary school students will get year-end report cards with final marks.

However, in most cases, marks are all they’ll see on June 24.

In a letter to parents and guardians, interim education director Pam Reinholdt said the job action taken by teachers in their contract dispute with the province will only allow for an “abbreviated report card” without comments for students in Grades 1 to 8.

For kindergarten students, there will be fewer comments than usual, she said, advising anyone with questions about their child’s progress to contact his or her teacher.

“Our elementary teachers are skilled professionals and we are confident that you have been kept well informed about your child’s progress throughout the year,” she stated.

Reinholdt’s letter came as the Halton District School Board announced that most of its elementary students will only receive letters indicating whether they have passed or failed.

The lone exception is students graduating from junior or middle schools. They will get marks, albeit without comments.

“It is not reasonable to expect 150 principals and vice-principals to take on the work of approximately 2,700 classroom teachers while also attending to essential end of year responsibilities,” the Halton announcement stated.

The Hamilton board has about 2,100 elementary teachers, 93 principals and 32 vice-principals at 93 elementary schools.

Board chair Todd White said non-union managers are helping principals and vice-principals input marks supplied by teachers.

“We know how important report cards are for the success of our students, so we want to get that information home to parents,” he said.

“Given the circumstances, this is the best possible route our board could have taken. We understand the importance of report cards. At the same time, we respect the position of our elementary teachers, so it’s a fine balance.”

Hamilton students to get ‘abbreviated’ report cards

News Jun 16, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Unlike their counterparts in Toronto, Halton, York and Peel districts, Hamilton public elementary school students will get year-end report cards with final marks.

However, in most cases, marks are all they’ll see on June 24.

In a letter to parents and guardians, interim education director Pam Reinholdt said the job action taken by teachers in their contract dispute with the province will only allow for an “abbreviated report card” without comments for students in Grades 1 to 8.

For kindergarten students, there will be fewer comments than usual, she said, advising anyone with questions about their child’s progress to contact his or her teacher.

“Given the circumstances, this is the best possible route our board could have taken."

“Our elementary teachers are skilled professionals and we are confident that you have been kept well informed about your child’s progress throughout the year,” she stated.

Reinholdt’s letter came as the Halton District School Board announced that most of its elementary students will only receive letters indicating whether they have passed or failed.

The lone exception is students graduating from junior or middle schools. They will get marks, albeit without comments.

“It is not reasonable to expect 150 principals and vice-principals to take on the work of approximately 2,700 classroom teachers while also attending to essential end of year responsibilities,” the Halton announcement stated.

The Hamilton board has about 2,100 elementary teachers, 93 principals and 32 vice-principals at 93 elementary schools.

Board chair Todd White said non-union managers are helping principals and vice-principals input marks supplied by teachers.

“We know how important report cards are for the success of our students, so we want to get that information home to parents,” he said.

“Given the circumstances, this is the best possible route our board could have taken. We understand the importance of report cards. At the same time, we respect the position of our elementary teachers, so it’s a fine balance.”

Hamilton students to get ‘abbreviated’ report cards

News Jun 16, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Unlike their counterparts in Toronto, Halton, York and Peel districts, Hamilton public elementary school students will get year-end report cards with final marks.

However, in most cases, marks are all they’ll see on June 24.

In a letter to parents and guardians, interim education director Pam Reinholdt said the job action taken by teachers in their contract dispute with the province will only allow for an “abbreviated report card” without comments for students in Grades 1 to 8.

For kindergarten students, there will be fewer comments than usual, she said, advising anyone with questions about their child’s progress to contact his or her teacher.

“Given the circumstances, this is the best possible route our board could have taken."

“Our elementary teachers are skilled professionals and we are confident that you have been kept well informed about your child’s progress throughout the year,” she stated.

Reinholdt’s letter came as the Halton District School Board announced that most of its elementary students will only receive letters indicating whether they have passed or failed.

The lone exception is students graduating from junior or middle schools. They will get marks, albeit without comments.

“It is not reasonable to expect 150 principals and vice-principals to take on the work of approximately 2,700 classroom teachers while also attending to essential end of year responsibilities,” the Halton announcement stated.

The Hamilton board has about 2,100 elementary teachers, 93 principals and 32 vice-principals at 93 elementary schools.

Board chair Todd White said non-union managers are helping principals and vice-principals input marks supplied by teachers.

“We know how important report cards are for the success of our students, so we want to get that information home to parents,” he said.

“Given the circumstances, this is the best possible route our board could have taken. We understand the importance of report cards. At the same time, we respect the position of our elementary teachers, so it’s a fine balance.”