Canada’s finance minister defends Conservative government’s record for veterans

News Jun 12, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Canada’s finance minister, Joe Oliver, defended how his government has handled the country’s veterans to a group of Hamilton Conservatives, including blaming unions for the Conservatives’ negative record.

Speaking to about 40 people at the Upper James Courtyard Marriott, Oliver said the Conservatives have “provided unprecedented amount (of resources) to our veterans.”

He said the services Canadian veterans have now are “comparable” to any other country in the world.

“Unfortunately the public service employees union has exploited some of the veterans for some of their own causes and misrepresented our record,” said Oliver.

The finance minister was responding to an Ancaster businessman who asked that the Conservative government and Prime Minister Stephen Harper be more “compassionate” to Canadians.

“We should start showing some sympathy to certain groups of people in Canada,” said the businessman, who didn’t want his name used.

He said his 72-year-old brother is a veteran who usually votes Conservative. But, said the businessman, his brother is voting Liberal, a fact that had him questioning the government’s policies.

“Our PM has to be more sympathetic to people,” he said.

The businessman said later that he agreed Veteran Affairs Minister Erin O’Toole has made improvements towards veterans after former minister Julian Fantino caused them undue hardship. O’Toole has had to close the gaps in veterans’ benefits system, address the closures of regional offices and repair any damage from the slights made by Fantino.

In the recent federal budget O’Toole announced new retirement benefits for disabled soldiers, an injury award and caregivers benefit.

During his speech, Oliver, who had been scheduled to be in Hamilton earlier this year, talked about the Conservatives’ economic accomplishments that had been achieved especially during the worst economic fallout since the Great Depression.  Hamilton has benefited from the Conservatives’ funding receiving about $1 billion over the years, including $100 million to improve the Woodward Avenue treatment plant, $46 million for the Canmet Materials, funding for auto research at McMaster University, and various other infrastructure money spread across the city, including in Ancaster.

As the federal election creeps closer, Oliver says despite the polls showing a close race among the parties, the Conservatives “always seem to do better as we approach an election.”

He downplayed the NDP’s “extraordinary” win in Alberta, saying it was an accomplished due to “very special circumstances” and isn’t a harbinger of future success.

The Conservatives in the coming months will be campaigning on the themes of a strong economy, protecting the country and a robust foreign policy.

“Who do you trust to manage a $2 trillion economy?” says Oliver. “Who do you think can stand up to (Russian president) Vladimir Putin? Who do you trust to keep Canada safe?”

Oliver said Liberal leader Justin Trudeau “is not ready yet” to govern, while the NDP’s policies “are not reflective of what Canadians want.”

The event was organized by Hamilton’s Conservative party associations, with Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas federal Conservative candidate Vincent Samuel, Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Conservative candidate Diane Bubanko, and Hamilton Centre federal Conservative candidate Yonatan Rozenszajn in attendance. Hamilton Mountain does not have a federal Conservative candidate yet.

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale Conservative MP David Sweet was absent.

Canada’s finance minister defends Conservative government’s record for veterans

News Jun 12, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Canada’s finance minister, Joe Oliver, defended how his government has handled the country’s veterans to a group of Hamilton Conservatives, including blaming unions for the Conservatives’ negative record.

Speaking to about 40 people at the Upper James Courtyard Marriott, Oliver said the Conservatives have “provided unprecedented amount (of resources) to our veterans.”

He said the services Canadian veterans have now are “comparable” to any other country in the world.

“Unfortunately the public service employees union has exploited some of the veterans for some of their own causes and misrepresented our record,” said Oliver.

The finance minister was responding to an Ancaster businessman who asked that the Conservative government and Prime Minister Stephen Harper be more “compassionate” to Canadians.

“We should start showing some sympathy to certain groups of people in Canada,” said the businessman, who didn’t want his name used.

He said his 72-year-old brother is a veteran who usually votes Conservative. But, said the businessman, his brother is voting Liberal, a fact that had him questioning the government’s policies.

“Our PM has to be more sympathetic to people,” he said.

The businessman said later that he agreed Veteran Affairs Minister Erin O’Toole has made improvements towards veterans after former minister Julian Fantino caused them undue hardship. O’Toole has had to close the gaps in veterans’ benefits system, address the closures of regional offices and repair any damage from the slights made by Fantino.

In the recent federal budget O’Toole announced new retirement benefits for disabled soldiers, an injury award and caregivers benefit.

During his speech, Oliver, who had been scheduled to be in Hamilton earlier this year, talked about the Conservatives’ economic accomplishments that had been achieved especially during the worst economic fallout since the Great Depression.  Hamilton has benefited from the Conservatives’ funding receiving about $1 billion over the years, including $100 million to improve the Woodward Avenue treatment plant, $46 million for the Canmet Materials, funding for auto research at McMaster University, and various other infrastructure money spread across the city, including in Ancaster.

As the federal election creeps closer, Oliver says despite the polls showing a close race among the parties, the Conservatives “always seem to do better as we approach an election.”

He downplayed the NDP’s “extraordinary” win in Alberta, saying it was an accomplished due to “very special circumstances” and isn’t a harbinger of future success.

The Conservatives in the coming months will be campaigning on the themes of a strong economy, protecting the country and a robust foreign policy.

“Who do you trust to manage a $2 trillion economy?” says Oliver. “Who do you think can stand up to (Russian president) Vladimir Putin? Who do you trust to keep Canada safe?”

Oliver said Liberal leader Justin Trudeau “is not ready yet” to govern, while the NDP’s policies “are not reflective of what Canadians want.”

The event was organized by Hamilton’s Conservative party associations, with Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas federal Conservative candidate Vincent Samuel, Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Conservative candidate Diane Bubanko, and Hamilton Centre federal Conservative candidate Yonatan Rozenszajn in attendance. Hamilton Mountain does not have a federal Conservative candidate yet.

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale Conservative MP David Sweet was absent.

Canada’s finance minister defends Conservative government’s record for veterans

News Jun 12, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Canada’s finance minister, Joe Oliver, defended how his government has handled the country’s veterans to a group of Hamilton Conservatives, including blaming unions for the Conservatives’ negative record.

Speaking to about 40 people at the Upper James Courtyard Marriott, Oliver said the Conservatives have “provided unprecedented amount (of resources) to our veterans.”

He said the services Canadian veterans have now are “comparable” to any other country in the world.

“Unfortunately the public service employees union has exploited some of the veterans for some of their own causes and misrepresented our record,” said Oliver.

The finance minister was responding to an Ancaster businessman who asked that the Conservative government and Prime Minister Stephen Harper be more “compassionate” to Canadians.

“We should start showing some sympathy to certain groups of people in Canada,” said the businessman, who didn’t want his name used.

He said his 72-year-old brother is a veteran who usually votes Conservative. But, said the businessman, his brother is voting Liberal, a fact that had him questioning the government’s policies.

“Our PM has to be more sympathetic to people,” he said.

The businessman said later that he agreed Veteran Affairs Minister Erin O’Toole has made improvements towards veterans after former minister Julian Fantino caused them undue hardship. O’Toole has had to close the gaps in veterans’ benefits system, address the closures of regional offices and repair any damage from the slights made by Fantino.

In the recent federal budget O’Toole announced new retirement benefits for disabled soldiers, an injury award and caregivers benefit.

During his speech, Oliver, who had been scheduled to be in Hamilton earlier this year, talked about the Conservatives’ economic accomplishments that had been achieved especially during the worst economic fallout since the Great Depression.  Hamilton has benefited from the Conservatives’ funding receiving about $1 billion over the years, including $100 million to improve the Woodward Avenue treatment plant, $46 million for the Canmet Materials, funding for auto research at McMaster University, and various other infrastructure money spread across the city, including in Ancaster.

As the federal election creeps closer, Oliver says despite the polls showing a close race among the parties, the Conservatives “always seem to do better as we approach an election.”

He downplayed the NDP’s “extraordinary” win in Alberta, saying it was an accomplished due to “very special circumstances” and isn’t a harbinger of future success.

The Conservatives in the coming months will be campaigning on the themes of a strong economy, protecting the country and a robust foreign policy.

“Who do you trust to manage a $2 trillion economy?” says Oliver. “Who do you think can stand up to (Russian president) Vladimir Putin? Who do you trust to keep Canada safe?”

Oliver said Liberal leader Justin Trudeau “is not ready yet” to govern, while the NDP’s policies “are not reflective of what Canadians want.”

The event was organized by Hamilton’s Conservative party associations, with Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas federal Conservative candidate Vincent Samuel, Hamilton East-Stoney Creek Conservative candidate Diane Bubanko, and Hamilton Centre federal Conservative candidate Yonatan Rozenszajn in attendance. Hamilton Mountain does not have a federal Conservative candidate yet.

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale Conservative MP David Sweet was absent.