Canada’s finance minister says Conservatives support Canada Post’s five-year plan

News Jun 12, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Federal Finance Minister Joe Oliver says the Conservative government has no plans to stop Canada Post from eliminating door-to-door mail service.

Oliver, who was in Hamilton at the Courtyard Marriott on Upper James speaking to about 40 people June 12, said Canada Post is losing “$1 billion (in revenue because) of electronic communications.”

In spite of the fact that Canada Post announced last month a pre-tax profit of $24 million for the first quarter of 2015, down from $194 million in 2014, Oliver said that Canadians sent 1.4 billion fewer pieces of mail in 2014 than they did in 2006 leading to the loss in revenue.

“If it comes down to affordability, we will protect the interest of the Canadian taxpayers,” he said.

The Conservatives’ stance on supporting Canada Post’s five-year plan to ensure its sustainability is in contrast to the NDP’s recent election pledge announced last month that it will scrap the Crown corporation’s plan and examine alternative ways to make it profitable.

Hamilton Centre NDP MP David Christopherson said during a news conference at Hamilton City Hall that the NDP will halt the installation of super mailboxes, and Canada Post will have to remove them at their cost.

“The government must instruct Canada Post to reconsider its options,” said Christopherson.

The Liberals have called for a moratorium to Canada Post’s plan.

The city of Hamilton received a setback when an Ontario Superior Court justice upheld Canada Post’s authority to install community mailboxes, saying the municipality’s bylaw, which includes a $200 fee, is “inapplicable” to the federal agency.

Hamilton councillors had hoped the new bylaw would help to protect the safety of homeowners as Canada Post installs its super mailboxes. Canada Post saw the bylaw as infringing on its authority.

Oliver said despite the uproar from homeowners seeing their door-to-door mail delivery eliminated, Canada Post should be responsive to Canadian residents’ needs.

“I hope (Canada Post) will be sensitive to local issues,” said Oliver, including to residents who are seniors and physically challenged.

Canada’s finance minister says Conservatives support Canada Post’s five-year plan

News Jun 12, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Federal Finance Minister Joe Oliver says the Conservative government has no plans to stop Canada Post from eliminating door-to-door mail service.

Oliver, who was in Hamilton at the Courtyard Marriott on Upper James speaking to about 40 people June 12, said Canada Post is losing “$1 billion (in revenue because) of electronic communications.”

In spite of the fact that Canada Post announced last month a pre-tax profit of $24 million for the first quarter of 2015, down from $194 million in 2014, Oliver said that Canadians sent 1.4 billion fewer pieces of mail in 2014 than they did in 2006 leading to the loss in revenue.

“If it comes down to affordability, we will protect the interest of the Canadian taxpayers,” he said.

The Conservatives’ stance on supporting Canada Post’s five-year plan to ensure its sustainability is in contrast to the NDP’s recent election pledge announced last month that it will scrap the Crown corporation’s plan and examine alternative ways to make it profitable.

Hamilton Centre NDP MP David Christopherson said during a news conference at Hamilton City Hall that the NDP will halt the installation of super mailboxes, and Canada Post will have to remove them at their cost.

“The government must instruct Canada Post to reconsider its options,” said Christopherson.

The Liberals have called for a moratorium to Canada Post’s plan.

The city of Hamilton received a setback when an Ontario Superior Court justice upheld Canada Post’s authority to install community mailboxes, saying the municipality’s bylaw, which includes a $200 fee, is “inapplicable” to the federal agency.

Hamilton councillors had hoped the new bylaw would help to protect the safety of homeowners as Canada Post installs its super mailboxes. Canada Post saw the bylaw as infringing on its authority.

Oliver said despite the uproar from homeowners seeing their door-to-door mail delivery eliminated, Canada Post should be responsive to Canadian residents’ needs.

“I hope (Canada Post) will be sensitive to local issues,” said Oliver, including to residents who are seniors and physically challenged.

Canada’s finance minister says Conservatives support Canada Post’s five-year plan

News Jun 12, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Federal Finance Minister Joe Oliver says the Conservative government has no plans to stop Canada Post from eliminating door-to-door mail service.

Oliver, who was in Hamilton at the Courtyard Marriott on Upper James speaking to about 40 people June 12, said Canada Post is losing “$1 billion (in revenue because) of electronic communications.”

In spite of the fact that Canada Post announced last month a pre-tax profit of $24 million for the first quarter of 2015, down from $194 million in 2014, Oliver said that Canadians sent 1.4 billion fewer pieces of mail in 2014 than they did in 2006 leading to the loss in revenue.

“If it comes down to affordability, we will protect the interest of the Canadian taxpayers,” he said.

The Conservatives’ stance on supporting Canada Post’s five-year plan to ensure its sustainability is in contrast to the NDP’s recent election pledge announced last month that it will scrap the Crown corporation’s plan and examine alternative ways to make it profitable.

Hamilton Centre NDP MP David Christopherson said during a news conference at Hamilton City Hall that the NDP will halt the installation of super mailboxes, and Canada Post will have to remove them at their cost.

“The government must instruct Canada Post to reconsider its options,” said Christopherson.

The Liberals have called for a moratorium to Canada Post’s plan.

The city of Hamilton received a setback when an Ontario Superior Court justice upheld Canada Post’s authority to install community mailboxes, saying the municipality’s bylaw, which includes a $200 fee, is “inapplicable” to the federal agency.

Hamilton councillors had hoped the new bylaw would help to protect the safety of homeowners as Canada Post installs its super mailboxes. Canada Post saw the bylaw as infringing on its authority.

Oliver said despite the uproar from homeowners seeing their door-to-door mail delivery eliminated, Canada Post should be responsive to Canadian residents’ needs.

“I hope (Canada Post) will be sensitive to local issues,” said Oliver, including to residents who are seniors and physically challenged.