LRT may have long-term spin off for Mountain

News Jun 12, 2015 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

The province’s plan to spend $1.2 billion on new light rail transit and Go train service in Hamilton could lead to some positive long-term spin off affects for the Mountain according to a couple of local business leaders.

“I think it’s a benefit to our city and if our city is doing well, we’re all going to prosper,” said Concession Street business improvement area chair Leo Santos.

The restaurant owner said the downtown LRT and new Go train station on Centennial Parkway North should lead to more investment in Hamilton and some of that business could find its way up the Mountain.

“This city will never be a world-class city without the lower city being developed,” said long-time Mountain business operator Peter Martin who feels the LRT will have little effect on the Mountain in the short term but may lead to more people and investment coming to the upper city down the road. “I think we’re going to get (more) influx from Toronto because it’s going to be attractive for them to live here and commute.”

Martin said any future planning for the city must take into account the Mountain.

West Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead doubts the Mountain will see any positive spinoffs form the provincial transit initiative for 15 years.

“Once construction starts it will be very difficult for Mountain residents to access it,” Whitehead said. “No matter where you put these things there will be short-term pain.”

Whitehead said the Wynne government is giving Hamilton a billion dollar gift “and who are we to turn our nose up at it?”

That feeling is shared by east Mountain councillor Tom Jackson.

“When a senior level of government wants to drop a billion dollars in our city, I give a heart-felt thank you,” said Jackson who suspects implementation of the LRT “will be tricky and chaotic.”

Jackson said if the predictions of economic benefits from the provincial investment prove to be true it will mean more commercial taxes for the city which should help keep taxes down on the Mountain and elsewhere.

“I don’t see the Mountain at this time getting any benefit from it,” said central Mountain councillor Scott Duvall. “But we must not lose sight that we need increased bus service on the Mountain.”

Still with transportation, Jackson is pushing for the Red Hill Valley Parkway and the Linc to be expanded to six-lanes in both directions.

Preliminary estimates put a $100 million price tag on the widening and Jackson is hoping the city and province can split the cost 50/50.

The potential Red Hill and Linc projects have been included as part of the city’s transportation master plan review that is currently underway and expected to wrap up by early to mid-2016.

 

LRT may have long-term spin off for Mountain

Business leaders hope transit initiative will spur investment

News Jun 12, 2015 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

The province’s plan to spend $1.2 billion on new light rail transit and Go train service in Hamilton could lead to some positive long-term spin off affects for the Mountain according to a couple of local business leaders.

“I think it’s a benefit to our city and if our city is doing well, we’re all going to prosper,” said Concession Street business improvement area chair Leo Santos.

The restaurant owner said the downtown LRT and new Go train station on Centennial Parkway North should lead to more investment in Hamilton and some of that business could find its way up the Mountain.

“This city will never be a world-class city without the lower city being developed,” said long-time Mountain business operator Peter Martin who feels the LRT will have little effect on the Mountain in the short term but may lead to more people and investment coming to the upper city down the road. “I think we’re going to get (more) influx from Toronto because it’s going to be attractive for them to live here and commute.”

Martin said any future planning for the city must take into account the Mountain.

West Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead doubts the Mountain will see any positive spinoffs form the provincial transit initiative for 15 years.

“Once construction starts it will be very difficult for Mountain residents to access it,” Whitehead said. “No matter where you put these things there will be short-term pain.”

Whitehead said the Wynne government is giving Hamilton a billion dollar gift “and who are we to turn our nose up at it?”

That feeling is shared by east Mountain councillor Tom Jackson.

“When a senior level of government wants to drop a billion dollars in our city, I give a heart-felt thank you,” said Jackson who suspects implementation of the LRT “will be tricky and chaotic.”

Jackson said if the predictions of economic benefits from the provincial investment prove to be true it will mean more commercial taxes for the city which should help keep taxes down on the Mountain and elsewhere.

“I don’t see the Mountain at this time getting any benefit from it,” said central Mountain councillor Scott Duvall. “But we must not lose sight that we need increased bus service on the Mountain.”

Still with transportation, Jackson is pushing for the Red Hill Valley Parkway and the Linc to be expanded to six-lanes in both directions.

Preliminary estimates put a $100 million price tag on the widening and Jackson is hoping the city and province can split the cost 50/50.

The potential Red Hill and Linc projects have been included as part of the city’s transportation master plan review that is currently underway and expected to wrap up by early to mid-2016.

 

LRT may have long-term spin off for Mountain

Business leaders hope transit initiative will spur investment

News Jun 12, 2015 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

The province’s plan to spend $1.2 billion on new light rail transit and Go train service in Hamilton could lead to some positive long-term spin off affects for the Mountain according to a couple of local business leaders.

“I think it’s a benefit to our city and if our city is doing well, we’re all going to prosper,” said Concession Street business improvement area chair Leo Santos.

The restaurant owner said the downtown LRT and new Go train station on Centennial Parkway North should lead to more investment in Hamilton and some of that business could find its way up the Mountain.

“This city will never be a world-class city without the lower city being developed,” said long-time Mountain business operator Peter Martin who feels the LRT will have little effect on the Mountain in the short term but may lead to more people and investment coming to the upper city down the road. “I think we’re going to get (more) influx from Toronto because it’s going to be attractive for them to live here and commute.”

Martin said any future planning for the city must take into account the Mountain.

West Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead doubts the Mountain will see any positive spinoffs form the provincial transit initiative for 15 years.

“Once construction starts it will be very difficult for Mountain residents to access it,” Whitehead said. “No matter where you put these things there will be short-term pain.”

Whitehead said the Wynne government is giving Hamilton a billion dollar gift “and who are we to turn our nose up at it?”

That feeling is shared by east Mountain councillor Tom Jackson.

“When a senior level of government wants to drop a billion dollars in our city, I give a heart-felt thank you,” said Jackson who suspects implementation of the LRT “will be tricky and chaotic.”

Jackson said if the predictions of economic benefits from the provincial investment prove to be true it will mean more commercial taxes for the city which should help keep taxes down on the Mountain and elsewhere.

“I don’t see the Mountain at this time getting any benefit from it,” said central Mountain councillor Scott Duvall. “But we must not lose sight that we need increased bus service on the Mountain.”

Still with transportation, Jackson is pushing for the Red Hill Valley Parkway and the Linc to be expanded to six-lanes in both directions.

Preliminary estimates put a $100 million price tag on the widening and Jackson is hoping the city and province can split the cost 50/50.

The potential Red Hill and Linc projects have been included as part of the city’s transportation master plan review that is currently underway and expected to wrap up by early to mid-2016.