Bocce, elevators, and washrooms approved for federal funding by Hamilton councillors

News Jun 03, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A bocce facility in Stoney Creek, elevators in Flamborough area, improvements to the Ancaster Aquatic Centre and Jimmy Thompson Pool, and a new roof for the Dundas Public Library are just some of the 27 infrastructure projects Hamilton councillors will be submitting to the federal government's $150-million Canada 150 program for funding.

But the projects that didn’t make the cut included $1 million for Auchmar to conduct stone work and $2.8 million to renovate St. Mark’s a former Anglican Church on Bay Street.

Most of the projects are focused on providing better accessibility to public facilities, such as installing elevators at the Rosedale, Beverly, and Carlisle arenas. Other projects include renovating washrooms to make them accessible at Turner Park, Huntington Recreation Centre, Bobby Kerr Park and Trenholme Park, said John Savoia, senior policy advisor for the city.

Savoia said at least one project is located in every ward of the city.

Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla said he couldn’t support the project list because it had as the second ranked project on the list a storage building for the Ferris Park Bocce Facility, ahead of what he considered more important projects that expands accessibility to facilities.

“That is a red flag slapping me in the face,” said Merulla. “I can’t support what is before us.”

The bocce facility project costs about $178,750 and, said Stoney Creek councillor Maria Pearson, it fits the government’s funding criteria.

Pearson said the storage facility is the only project for Ward 10 among the 27 submitted to the federal government.

“The project is ready to go,” said Pearson. “It could be built by the end of this summer.”

Merulla also was opposed to the $205,000 project to build an outdoor pavilion at the Griffin House in Ancaster.

The total cost of the 27 projects is nearly $20.5 million. If all those projects received federal funding, it would total just over $7 million. But Savoia says that won’t happen. He suspects the community of Hamilton will receive about $2 million out of the $44.4 million the federal government has allocated for Ontario. 

The federal government announced its Canada 150 fund in its last budget that would provide $150 million across the country to help celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary.

The federal funding requirements include providing a maximum amount of 50 per cent per project, with a funding ceiling of $1 million. The city would have to pick up the rest of the cost of the project.

All non-profit, and public sector agencies can apply for the funding, including municipalities.

Savoia said Auchmar and St. Mark’s were not eligible for the funding because they didn’t meet the criteria. Federal authorities want projects to be small in scope to meet the March 31, 2018 timeline, and should be construction ready.

Other reasons why both projects were not included, said Savoia, include they don’t improve Canada’s infrastructure, and the upgrades “don’t provide long-term benefits to a community.”

He said federal authorities have already reviewed Auchmar for other funding applications, and have consistently passed on it.

“It seems to me the federal government has reviewed the project to no end,” he said.

In addition, since the city is currently looking at selling or leasing the Auchmar, Savoia said the city would have to return any federal funding if the city does sell the historic property.

Savoia said the projects on the infrastructure list are not based upon priorities, but on how much each one costs, ranking them from lowest to highest. He said based upon past experience any infrastructure lists Hamilton has submitted to the federal government for funding, Ottawa officials will pick and choose which projects receive money.

For instance in 2012, even though Hamilton submitted a number of projects to the federal government, Ottawa officials selected the city’s top choice, the Ancaster Senior Achievement Centre, and the 11th choice, Sackville Hill Senior Centre to fund. The same thing happened in 2009 when Hamilton provide a wide range of infrastructure projects to the federal government for funding opportunities, but Ottawa officials again selected their own projects to fund, such as various wastewater projects, the construction of the Stoney Creek Recreation Centre, and the renovation of the Westmount Recreation Centre. Hamilton at the time received about $180 million worth of infrastructure funding as part of the federal government’s economic stimulus program.

Councillors approved the project list at its June 3 special council meeting to meet the June 9 deadline.

Savoia says based again on experience, the federal government could have identified its projects to fund by August or September, prior to the October 19 federal election.

 

 

Bocce, elevators, and washrooms approved for federal funding by Hamilton councillors

News Jun 03, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A bocce facility in Stoney Creek, elevators in Flamborough area, improvements to the Ancaster Aquatic Centre and Jimmy Thompson Pool, and a new roof for the Dundas Public Library are just some of the 27 infrastructure projects Hamilton councillors will be submitting to the federal government's $150-million Canada 150 program for funding.

But the projects that didn’t make the cut included $1 million for Auchmar to conduct stone work and $2.8 million to renovate St. Mark’s a former Anglican Church on Bay Street.

Most of the projects are focused on providing better accessibility to public facilities, such as installing elevators at the Rosedale, Beverly, and Carlisle arenas. Other projects include renovating washrooms to make them accessible at Turner Park, Huntington Recreation Centre, Bobby Kerr Park and Trenholme Park, said John Savoia, senior policy advisor for the city.

Savoia said at least one project is located in every ward of the city.

Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla said he couldn’t support the project list because it had as the second ranked project on the list a storage building for the Ferris Park Bocce Facility, ahead of what he considered more important projects that expands accessibility to facilities.

“That is a red flag slapping me in the face,” said Merulla. “I can’t support what is before us.”

The bocce facility project costs about $178,750 and, said Stoney Creek councillor Maria Pearson, it fits the government’s funding criteria.

Pearson said the storage facility is the only project for Ward 10 among the 27 submitted to the federal government.

“The project is ready to go,” said Pearson. “It could be built by the end of this summer.”

Merulla also was opposed to the $205,000 project to build an outdoor pavilion at the Griffin House in Ancaster.

The total cost of the 27 projects is nearly $20.5 million. If all those projects received federal funding, it would total just over $7 million. But Savoia says that won’t happen. He suspects the community of Hamilton will receive about $2 million out of the $44.4 million the federal government has allocated for Ontario. 

The federal government announced its Canada 150 fund in its last budget that would provide $150 million across the country to help celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary.

The federal funding requirements include providing a maximum amount of 50 per cent per project, with a funding ceiling of $1 million. The city would have to pick up the rest of the cost of the project.

All non-profit, and public sector agencies can apply for the funding, including municipalities.

Savoia said Auchmar and St. Mark’s were not eligible for the funding because they didn’t meet the criteria. Federal authorities want projects to be small in scope to meet the March 31, 2018 timeline, and should be construction ready.

Other reasons why both projects were not included, said Savoia, include they don’t improve Canada’s infrastructure, and the upgrades “don’t provide long-term benefits to a community.”

He said federal authorities have already reviewed Auchmar for other funding applications, and have consistently passed on it.

“It seems to me the federal government has reviewed the project to no end,” he said.

In addition, since the city is currently looking at selling or leasing the Auchmar, Savoia said the city would have to return any federal funding if the city does sell the historic property.

Savoia said the projects on the infrastructure list are not based upon priorities, but on how much each one costs, ranking them from lowest to highest. He said based upon past experience any infrastructure lists Hamilton has submitted to the federal government for funding, Ottawa officials will pick and choose which projects receive money.

For instance in 2012, even though Hamilton submitted a number of projects to the federal government, Ottawa officials selected the city’s top choice, the Ancaster Senior Achievement Centre, and the 11th choice, Sackville Hill Senior Centre to fund. The same thing happened in 2009 when Hamilton provide a wide range of infrastructure projects to the federal government for funding opportunities, but Ottawa officials again selected their own projects to fund, such as various wastewater projects, the construction of the Stoney Creek Recreation Centre, and the renovation of the Westmount Recreation Centre. Hamilton at the time received about $180 million worth of infrastructure funding as part of the federal government’s economic stimulus program.

Councillors approved the project list at its June 3 special council meeting to meet the June 9 deadline.

Savoia says based again on experience, the federal government could have identified its projects to fund by August or September, prior to the October 19 federal election.

 

 

Bocce, elevators, and washrooms approved for federal funding by Hamilton councillors

News Jun 03, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A bocce facility in Stoney Creek, elevators in Flamborough area, improvements to the Ancaster Aquatic Centre and Jimmy Thompson Pool, and a new roof for the Dundas Public Library are just some of the 27 infrastructure projects Hamilton councillors will be submitting to the federal government's $150-million Canada 150 program for funding.

But the projects that didn’t make the cut included $1 million for Auchmar to conduct stone work and $2.8 million to renovate St. Mark’s a former Anglican Church on Bay Street.

Most of the projects are focused on providing better accessibility to public facilities, such as installing elevators at the Rosedale, Beverly, and Carlisle arenas. Other projects include renovating washrooms to make them accessible at Turner Park, Huntington Recreation Centre, Bobby Kerr Park and Trenholme Park, said John Savoia, senior policy advisor for the city.

Savoia said at least one project is located in every ward of the city.

Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla said he couldn’t support the project list because it had as the second ranked project on the list a storage building for the Ferris Park Bocce Facility, ahead of what he considered more important projects that expands accessibility to facilities.

“That is a red flag slapping me in the face,” said Merulla. “I can’t support what is before us.”

The bocce facility project costs about $178,750 and, said Stoney Creek councillor Maria Pearson, it fits the government’s funding criteria.

Pearson said the storage facility is the only project for Ward 10 among the 27 submitted to the federal government.

“The project is ready to go,” said Pearson. “It could be built by the end of this summer.”

Merulla also was opposed to the $205,000 project to build an outdoor pavilion at the Griffin House in Ancaster.

The total cost of the 27 projects is nearly $20.5 million. If all those projects received federal funding, it would total just over $7 million. But Savoia says that won’t happen. He suspects the community of Hamilton will receive about $2 million out of the $44.4 million the federal government has allocated for Ontario. 

The federal government announced its Canada 150 fund in its last budget that would provide $150 million across the country to help celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary.

The federal funding requirements include providing a maximum amount of 50 per cent per project, with a funding ceiling of $1 million. The city would have to pick up the rest of the cost of the project.

All non-profit, and public sector agencies can apply for the funding, including municipalities.

Savoia said Auchmar and St. Mark’s were not eligible for the funding because they didn’t meet the criteria. Federal authorities want projects to be small in scope to meet the March 31, 2018 timeline, and should be construction ready.

Other reasons why both projects were not included, said Savoia, include they don’t improve Canada’s infrastructure, and the upgrades “don’t provide long-term benefits to a community.”

He said federal authorities have already reviewed Auchmar for other funding applications, and have consistently passed on it.

“It seems to me the federal government has reviewed the project to no end,” he said.

In addition, since the city is currently looking at selling or leasing the Auchmar, Savoia said the city would have to return any federal funding if the city does sell the historic property.

Savoia said the projects on the infrastructure list are not based upon priorities, but on how much each one costs, ranking them from lowest to highest. He said based upon past experience any infrastructure lists Hamilton has submitted to the federal government for funding, Ottawa officials will pick and choose which projects receive money.

For instance in 2012, even though Hamilton submitted a number of projects to the federal government, Ottawa officials selected the city’s top choice, the Ancaster Senior Achievement Centre, and the 11th choice, Sackville Hill Senior Centre to fund. The same thing happened in 2009 when Hamilton provide a wide range of infrastructure projects to the federal government for funding opportunities, but Ottawa officials again selected their own projects to fund, such as various wastewater projects, the construction of the Stoney Creek Recreation Centre, and the renovation of the Westmount Recreation Centre. Hamilton at the time received about $180 million worth of infrastructure funding as part of the federal government’s economic stimulus program.

Councillors approved the project list at its June 3 special council meeting to meet the June 9 deadline.

Savoia says based again on experience, the federal government could have identified its projects to fund by August or September, prior to the October 19 federal election.