Hamilton is blooming

News Jun 01, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

The City of Hamilton’s horticulture staff began the annual flower bed planting last week in local traffic islands, sidewalk beds and around various city-owned facilities.

 

Here are some frequently asked questions and interesting facts about the flower bed planting program:

 

How many plants are scheduled to be planted in 2015?

Over 205,000 plants from the horticultural greenhouses in Gage Park will be planted in the 2015 season.

 

When did the city start planting?

Each year the city schedules planting for the week after the May long weekend. This year the long weekend occurred early and, based on the forecast calling for two nights of frost, planting was delayed until earlier this week.

 

When will this year’s planting wrap up?

The planting is expected to wrap up by the last week of June.

 

What kinds of flowers are planted?

Petunia, Marigold, Vinca, Begonia, Alyssum, Dusty Miller, Salvia, Geranium, Dahlia, Alternanthera, Celosia, Ipomoea, Lantana, Juncus and Pennisetum

 

Where do the plants come from?

The city’s horticulture team produces over 205,000 flowers in our own greenhouses for programs such as: enhanced streetscaping (flower traffic islands, hanging baskets and planters) and general horticulture activities (Sam Lawrence Park, Gore Park, Gage Park and city-owned buildings).  We purchase seedlings (plugs) from various local suppliers who are chosen through a yearly tendering process. We then grow the seedlings to maturity to be planted throughout the city.

 

How are the plants chosen?

Plants are chosen for:

  • Prolonged display of colour into cooler weather (begonia, celosia, geranium, marigold, and lantana).
  • Use of tropicals for added visual interest.
  • Plants that require little or no deadheading.
  • Salt tolerance in specific areas.
  • Wind tolerance in specific areas.
  • New varieties for added interest in traffic islands.
 

How often are the plants watered?

Traffic island flower beds are watered daily for the first 1-2 weeks. Once established, the frequency is reduced to every second day. This is done primarily by in-ground irrigation systems supplemented by contracted watering services. Hanging baskets and planters are watered every second day by contracted services. Watering frequency is adjusted according to weather conditions. All irrigation systems have rain sensors so that irrigation does not operate during rain events.

 

Last year a new large vegetable garden was planted at the rear of City Hall. What is this for?

The Horticulture section started a small vegetable garden at the front of City Hall several years ago. This was to show the citizens of Hamilton how they can grow their own food in their own gardens with examples of successful crops as well as showing how attractive the vegetables can be in comparison to traditional annual flowers. This program proved so successful that a large bed was installed along Hunter Street next to the upper parking lot. Details:

  • Size 360 sq. m
  • Crops grown are to make a salad and a few more – lettuce, cucumber, tomato, pepper, eggplant, green and yellow beans and zucchini
  • Approximately 2,900 plants in total
  • The vegetables are grown organically with natural fertilizers and pest control measures
  • All produce is grown and maintained by horticulture staff and donated to Hamilton Food Share
What is the role of the Hamilton in Bloom program?

Sponsorship dollars help offset the cost of the flower bed program.

 

How does the Hamilton in Bloom program work?

The City of Hamilton's Hamilton in Bloom program transforms asphalt and concrete traffic islands into colourful flower beds. Each year traffic islands throughout Hamilton are planted with annual flowers. Plant material is selected for its vibrant colour, interesting form and tolerance for adverse roadway conditions.

All of the islands are designed, planted and maintained by the City. The Hamilton in Bloom program offers civic-minded businesses, service clubs, groups, individuals and organizations an opportunity to play an important role in making Hamilton a great city in which to live, work and play.

 

Is anything special planned for the Pan Am Games?

When designs were created for the 2015 beds, flowers in the official Pan Am colours were chosen for all beds along the main corridors into the city and to the stadium precinct. These colours include orange, white, light blue and light green.

Hamilton is blooming

More than 200,000 plants going into city-owned medians, gardens

News Jun 01, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

The City of Hamilton’s horticulture staff began the annual flower bed planting last week in local traffic islands, sidewalk beds and around various city-owned facilities.

 

Here are some frequently asked questions and interesting facts about the flower bed planting program:

 

How many plants are scheduled to be planted in 2015?

Over 205,000 plants from the horticultural greenhouses in Gage Park will be planted in the 2015 season.

 

When did the city start planting?

Each year the city schedules planting for the week after the May long weekend. This year the long weekend occurred early and, based on the forecast calling for two nights of frost, planting was delayed until earlier this week.

 

When will this year’s planting wrap up?

The planting is expected to wrap up by the last week of June.

 

What kinds of flowers are planted?

Petunia, Marigold, Vinca, Begonia, Alyssum, Dusty Miller, Salvia, Geranium, Dahlia, Alternanthera, Celosia, Ipomoea, Lantana, Juncus and Pennisetum

 

Where do the plants come from?

The city’s horticulture team produces over 205,000 flowers in our own greenhouses for programs such as: enhanced streetscaping (flower traffic islands, hanging baskets and planters) and general horticulture activities (Sam Lawrence Park, Gore Park, Gage Park and city-owned buildings).  We purchase seedlings (plugs) from various local suppliers who are chosen through a yearly tendering process. We then grow the seedlings to maturity to be planted throughout the city.

 

How are the plants chosen?

Plants are chosen for:

  • Prolonged display of colour into cooler weather (begonia, celosia, geranium, marigold, and lantana).
  • Use of tropicals for added visual interest.
  • Plants that require little or no deadheading.
  • Salt tolerance in specific areas.
  • Wind tolerance in specific areas.
  • New varieties for added interest in traffic islands.
 

How often are the plants watered?

Traffic island flower beds are watered daily for the first 1-2 weeks. Once established, the frequency is reduced to every second day. This is done primarily by in-ground irrigation systems supplemented by contracted watering services. Hanging baskets and planters are watered every second day by contracted services. Watering frequency is adjusted according to weather conditions. All irrigation systems have rain sensors so that irrigation does not operate during rain events.

 

Last year a new large vegetable garden was planted at the rear of City Hall. What is this for?

The Horticulture section started a small vegetable garden at the front of City Hall several years ago. This was to show the citizens of Hamilton how they can grow their own food in their own gardens with examples of successful crops as well as showing how attractive the vegetables can be in comparison to traditional annual flowers. This program proved so successful that a large bed was installed along Hunter Street next to the upper parking lot. Details:

  • Size 360 sq. m
  • Crops grown are to make a salad and a few more – lettuce, cucumber, tomato, pepper, eggplant, green and yellow beans and zucchini
  • Approximately 2,900 plants in total
  • The vegetables are grown organically with natural fertilizers and pest control measures
  • All produce is grown and maintained by horticulture staff and donated to Hamilton Food Share
What is the role of the Hamilton in Bloom program?

Sponsorship dollars help offset the cost of the flower bed program.

 

How does the Hamilton in Bloom program work?

The City of Hamilton's Hamilton in Bloom program transforms asphalt and concrete traffic islands into colourful flower beds. Each year traffic islands throughout Hamilton are planted with annual flowers. Plant material is selected for its vibrant colour, interesting form and tolerance for adverse roadway conditions.

All of the islands are designed, planted and maintained by the City. The Hamilton in Bloom program offers civic-minded businesses, service clubs, groups, individuals and organizations an opportunity to play an important role in making Hamilton a great city in which to live, work and play.

 

Is anything special planned for the Pan Am Games?

When designs were created for the 2015 beds, flowers in the official Pan Am colours were chosen for all beds along the main corridors into the city and to the stadium precinct. These colours include orange, white, light blue and light green.

Hamilton is blooming

More than 200,000 plants going into city-owned medians, gardens

News Jun 01, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

The City of Hamilton’s horticulture staff began the annual flower bed planting last week in local traffic islands, sidewalk beds and around various city-owned facilities.

 

Here are some frequently asked questions and interesting facts about the flower bed planting program:

 

How many plants are scheduled to be planted in 2015?

Over 205,000 plants from the horticultural greenhouses in Gage Park will be planted in the 2015 season.

 

When did the city start planting?

Each year the city schedules planting for the week after the May long weekend. This year the long weekend occurred early and, based on the forecast calling for two nights of frost, planting was delayed until earlier this week.

 

When will this year’s planting wrap up?

The planting is expected to wrap up by the last week of June.

 

What kinds of flowers are planted?

Petunia, Marigold, Vinca, Begonia, Alyssum, Dusty Miller, Salvia, Geranium, Dahlia, Alternanthera, Celosia, Ipomoea, Lantana, Juncus and Pennisetum

 

Where do the plants come from?

The city’s horticulture team produces over 205,000 flowers in our own greenhouses for programs such as: enhanced streetscaping (flower traffic islands, hanging baskets and planters) and general horticulture activities (Sam Lawrence Park, Gore Park, Gage Park and city-owned buildings).  We purchase seedlings (plugs) from various local suppliers who are chosen through a yearly tendering process. We then grow the seedlings to maturity to be planted throughout the city.

 

How are the plants chosen?

Plants are chosen for:

  • Prolonged display of colour into cooler weather (begonia, celosia, geranium, marigold, and lantana).
  • Use of tropicals for added visual interest.
  • Plants that require little or no deadheading.
  • Salt tolerance in specific areas.
  • Wind tolerance in specific areas.
  • New varieties for added interest in traffic islands.
 

How often are the plants watered?

Traffic island flower beds are watered daily for the first 1-2 weeks. Once established, the frequency is reduced to every second day. This is done primarily by in-ground irrigation systems supplemented by contracted watering services. Hanging baskets and planters are watered every second day by contracted services. Watering frequency is adjusted according to weather conditions. All irrigation systems have rain sensors so that irrigation does not operate during rain events.

 

Last year a new large vegetable garden was planted at the rear of City Hall. What is this for?

The Horticulture section started a small vegetable garden at the front of City Hall several years ago. This was to show the citizens of Hamilton how they can grow their own food in their own gardens with examples of successful crops as well as showing how attractive the vegetables can be in comparison to traditional annual flowers. This program proved so successful that a large bed was installed along Hunter Street next to the upper parking lot. Details:

  • Size 360 sq. m
  • Crops grown are to make a salad and a few more – lettuce, cucumber, tomato, pepper, eggplant, green and yellow beans and zucchini
  • Approximately 2,900 plants in total
  • The vegetables are grown organically with natural fertilizers and pest control measures
  • All produce is grown and maintained by horticulture staff and donated to Hamilton Food Share
What is the role of the Hamilton in Bloom program?

Sponsorship dollars help offset the cost of the flower bed program.

 

How does the Hamilton in Bloom program work?

The City of Hamilton's Hamilton in Bloom program transforms asphalt and concrete traffic islands into colourful flower beds. Each year traffic islands throughout Hamilton are planted with annual flowers. Plant material is selected for its vibrant colour, interesting form and tolerance for adverse roadway conditions.

All of the islands are designed, planted and maintained by the City. The Hamilton in Bloom program offers civic-minded businesses, service clubs, groups, individuals and organizations an opportunity to play an important role in making Hamilton a great city in which to live, work and play.

 

Is anything special planned for the Pan Am Games?

When designs were created for the 2015 beds, flowers in the official Pan Am colours were chosen for all beds along the main corridors into the city and to the stadium precinct. These colours include orange, white, light blue and light green.