Hamilton NDP officials optimistic for future after nominating HWAD candidate

News May 31, 2015 by Kevin Werner Dundas Star News

As the federal New Democrats bask in the glow of a stunning NDP majority win in Alberta, while also seeing their popularity soar in Quebec, area NDP supporters are almost giddy with anticipation to the Oct. 19 federal election.

“How about those polls?” said Peggy Nash, Parkdale-High Park NDP MP, who was guest speaker at the Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas federal NDP riding association’s nomination meeting at St. Paul’s United Church in Dundas May 31.

“Don’t we need a change in this country after 10 years of Conservatives in power?”

Since Rachel Notley’s majority NDP win in Alberta, and the surging support in Quebec, the polls are reflecting Canadians acceptance of a possible NDP government, she said.

Five surveys from three different pollsters suggest a three-way federal election race this fall.

Nash said it’s time citizens see the NDP in a new way, rather than looking to the Liberals as the default party to support. The NDP, she says, has three times the number of MPs than the Liberals. In the 2011 federal election, the NDP was either first or second in over 220 ridings.

“That is a path to victory,” said Nash, the party’s industry critic. “We are a government in waiting.”

Alex Johnstone, 32, who was the only person accepted by the HWAD riding executive to be the candidate for the new riding, said after a decade of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, services have been cut, taxes reduced for the high-earning public and corporations, yet the economy remains stagnant.

“Ten years of a Harper government has not improved our day to day lives,” said Johnstone, the Ancaster-Glanbrook public school board trustee.  “We know we can do better.”

This is Johnstone’s second run at higher office. Last spring she finished third behind incumbent Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin in Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale in the provincial election.  But last fall she easily won re-election as trustee.

Supporting Johnstone in her nomination was Tom Cooper, chair of the Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction, Don Jaffray, executive director of the Social Planning and Research Council, and former Dundas trustee Jessica Brennan.

Johnstone will be facing off against Conservative candidate Vincent Samuel, Liberal candidate Filomena Tassi, and Green Party candidate Peter Ormond in the newly designed riding that includes Dundas, Ancaster, parts of the western section of Hamilton and a slice of the mountain.

With Johnstone’s nomination the NDP has all of their candidates for Hamilton in place. There are only two candidate spots left to be filled by the major parties both on the mountain: the Hamilton Mountain federal Liberals and Conservatives. Nominations for both candidates have yet to be announced.

Also attending the nomination meeting were Hamilton NDP MPPs Paul Miller, Monique Taylor, Hamilton Centre NDP MP David Christopherson, Hamilton Mountain NDP MP candidate Scott Duvall, and Flamborough-Glanbrook NDP MP candidate Mike DiLivio.

While the polls have the NDP ahead for the first time in nearly 30 years, HWAD president Peter Hutton says the public is fickle when it comes to elections. What the polls say in May sometimes doesn’t translate to victory in the fall, he said.

That proved true in 1988 when the Ed Broadbent-led NDP flying high in the polls in 1987, crashed to earth in the 1988 election as the Brian Mulroney’s Progressive Conservatives claimed a second-straight majority. The NDP finished third electing 43 MPs, their highest number at the time.

Johnstone said NDP leader Thomas Mulcair has been the only leader to stand up to Harper, opposing the new security legislation Bill C-51, fighting against Keystone XL, and criticizing the country’s foreign affairs direction.

An NDP-led government, said Johnstone, would build more affordable housing, conduct pension reform, and expand child care.

“There is a new sense of optimism and a fresh vision,” said Johnstone.

An earlier version of this story referred to Stephen Harper as "Premier" rather than Prime Minister. The context of the article attributed the error to Alex Johnstone. She did not make that mistake. We regret the error.

Hamilton NDP officials optimistic for future after nominating HWAD candidate

News May 31, 2015 by Kevin Werner Dundas Star News

As the federal New Democrats bask in the glow of a stunning NDP majority win in Alberta, while also seeing their popularity soar in Quebec, area NDP supporters are almost giddy with anticipation to the Oct. 19 federal election.

“How about those polls?” said Peggy Nash, Parkdale-High Park NDP MP, who was guest speaker at the Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas federal NDP riding association’s nomination meeting at St. Paul’s United Church in Dundas May 31.

“Don’t we need a change in this country after 10 years of Conservatives in power?”

Since Rachel Notley’s majority NDP win in Alberta, and the surging support in Quebec, the polls are reflecting Canadians acceptance of a possible NDP government, she said.

Five surveys from three different pollsters suggest a three-way federal election race this fall.

Nash said it’s time citizens see the NDP in a new way, rather than looking to the Liberals as the default party to support. The NDP, she says, has three times the number of MPs than the Liberals. In the 2011 federal election, the NDP was either first or second in over 220 ridings.

“That is a path to victory,” said Nash, the party’s industry critic. “We are a government in waiting.”

Alex Johnstone, 32, who was the only person accepted by the HWAD riding executive to be the candidate for the new riding, said after a decade of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, services have been cut, taxes reduced for the high-earning public and corporations, yet the economy remains stagnant.

“Ten years of a Harper government has not improved our day to day lives,” said Johnstone, the Ancaster-Glanbrook public school board trustee.  “We know we can do better.”

This is Johnstone’s second run at higher office. Last spring she finished third behind incumbent Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin in Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale in the provincial election.  But last fall she easily won re-election as trustee.

Supporting Johnstone in her nomination was Tom Cooper, chair of the Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction, Don Jaffray, executive director of the Social Planning and Research Council, and former Dundas trustee Jessica Brennan.

Johnstone will be facing off against Conservative candidate Vincent Samuel, Liberal candidate Filomena Tassi, and Green Party candidate Peter Ormond in the newly designed riding that includes Dundas, Ancaster, parts of the western section of Hamilton and a slice of the mountain.

With Johnstone’s nomination the NDP has all of their candidates for Hamilton in place. There are only two candidate spots left to be filled by the major parties both on the mountain: the Hamilton Mountain federal Liberals and Conservatives. Nominations for both candidates have yet to be announced.

Also attending the nomination meeting were Hamilton NDP MPPs Paul Miller, Monique Taylor, Hamilton Centre NDP MP David Christopherson, Hamilton Mountain NDP MP candidate Scott Duvall, and Flamborough-Glanbrook NDP MP candidate Mike DiLivio.

While the polls have the NDP ahead for the first time in nearly 30 years, HWAD president Peter Hutton says the public is fickle when it comes to elections. What the polls say in May sometimes doesn’t translate to victory in the fall, he said.

That proved true in 1988 when the Ed Broadbent-led NDP flying high in the polls in 1987, crashed to earth in the 1988 election as the Brian Mulroney’s Progressive Conservatives claimed a second-straight majority. The NDP finished third electing 43 MPs, their highest number at the time.

Johnstone said NDP leader Thomas Mulcair has been the only leader to stand up to Harper, opposing the new security legislation Bill C-51, fighting against Keystone XL, and criticizing the country’s foreign affairs direction.

An NDP-led government, said Johnstone, would build more affordable housing, conduct pension reform, and expand child care.

“There is a new sense of optimism and a fresh vision,” said Johnstone.

An earlier version of this story referred to Stephen Harper as "Premier" rather than Prime Minister. The context of the article attributed the error to Alex Johnstone. She did not make that mistake. We regret the error.

Hamilton NDP officials optimistic for future after nominating HWAD candidate

News May 31, 2015 by Kevin Werner Dundas Star News

As the federal New Democrats bask in the glow of a stunning NDP majority win in Alberta, while also seeing their popularity soar in Quebec, area NDP supporters are almost giddy with anticipation to the Oct. 19 federal election.

“How about those polls?” said Peggy Nash, Parkdale-High Park NDP MP, who was guest speaker at the Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas federal NDP riding association’s nomination meeting at St. Paul’s United Church in Dundas May 31.

“Don’t we need a change in this country after 10 years of Conservatives in power?”

Since Rachel Notley’s majority NDP win in Alberta, and the surging support in Quebec, the polls are reflecting Canadians acceptance of a possible NDP government, she said.

Five surveys from three different pollsters suggest a three-way federal election race this fall.

Nash said it’s time citizens see the NDP in a new way, rather than looking to the Liberals as the default party to support. The NDP, she says, has three times the number of MPs than the Liberals. In the 2011 federal election, the NDP was either first or second in over 220 ridings.

“That is a path to victory,” said Nash, the party’s industry critic. “We are a government in waiting.”

Alex Johnstone, 32, who was the only person accepted by the HWAD riding executive to be the candidate for the new riding, said after a decade of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, services have been cut, taxes reduced for the high-earning public and corporations, yet the economy remains stagnant.

“Ten years of a Harper government has not improved our day to day lives,” said Johnstone, the Ancaster-Glanbrook public school board trustee.  “We know we can do better.”

This is Johnstone’s second run at higher office. Last spring she finished third behind incumbent Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin in Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale in the provincial election.  But last fall she easily won re-election as trustee.

Supporting Johnstone in her nomination was Tom Cooper, chair of the Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction, Don Jaffray, executive director of the Social Planning and Research Council, and former Dundas trustee Jessica Brennan.

Johnstone will be facing off against Conservative candidate Vincent Samuel, Liberal candidate Filomena Tassi, and Green Party candidate Peter Ormond in the newly designed riding that includes Dundas, Ancaster, parts of the western section of Hamilton and a slice of the mountain.

With Johnstone’s nomination the NDP has all of their candidates for Hamilton in place. There are only two candidate spots left to be filled by the major parties both on the mountain: the Hamilton Mountain federal Liberals and Conservatives. Nominations for both candidates have yet to be announced.

Also attending the nomination meeting were Hamilton NDP MPPs Paul Miller, Monique Taylor, Hamilton Centre NDP MP David Christopherson, Hamilton Mountain NDP MP candidate Scott Duvall, and Flamborough-Glanbrook NDP MP candidate Mike DiLivio.

While the polls have the NDP ahead for the first time in nearly 30 years, HWAD president Peter Hutton says the public is fickle when it comes to elections. What the polls say in May sometimes doesn’t translate to victory in the fall, he said.

That proved true in 1988 when the Ed Broadbent-led NDP flying high in the polls in 1987, crashed to earth in the 1988 election as the Brian Mulroney’s Progressive Conservatives claimed a second-straight majority. The NDP finished third electing 43 MPs, their highest number at the time.

Johnstone said NDP leader Thomas Mulcair has been the only leader to stand up to Harper, opposing the new security legislation Bill C-51, fighting against Keystone XL, and criticizing the country’s foreign affairs direction.

An NDP-led government, said Johnstone, would build more affordable housing, conduct pension reform, and expand child care.

“There is a new sense of optimism and a fresh vision,” said Johnstone.

An earlier version of this story referred to Stephen Harper as "Premier" rather than Prime Minister. The context of the article attributed the error to Alex Johnstone. She did not make that mistake. We regret the error.