Upper Stoney Creek food bank gets $16,000 grant

News May 28, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Heritage Green Food Bank may have had a slow start when it first opened almost a year ago in June 2014.

But Neighbour to Neighbour officials were correct in predicting a demand for its services when they organized the satellite food bank in upper Stoney Creek at the Heritage Green Baptist Church on Paramount Drive.

Food Services Manager Mark Raymond said 72 families used the food bank during the six months it was open last year.

“Folks in upper Stoney Creek have been very supportive of our efforts to serve people in their neighbourhood,” Raymond stated.

After holding two food drives in 2014, the community raised 1,834 pounds of donations, he said.

“We hope to continue to get the message out to the community that people who need help will feel welcome using our service,” Raymond said.

At council’s May 13 meeting, politicians approved a motion introduced by Stoney Creek councillor Doug Conley to provide $16,000 from the former Newalta royalties reserve to the food bank.

The money will be used, said Raymond, for staffing, administration and warehousing costs. The food bank has a receptionist, who is a trained resource counsellor, and a driver who transports donated foods and materials.

The non-profit organization has two warehouse locations and two vehicles to process the estimated 700,000 pounds of food that is donated annually.

The church approached Neighbour to Neighbour about creating a food bank in upper Stoney Creek in late 2013 after a few of the parishioners said they needed food and wanted to know where to get it.

A Social Planning and Research Council of Hamilton 2012 study found there were about 6,600 individuals, about 35 per cent of whom were children, living below the poverty line in the upper Stoney Creek area.

The report noted a lack of food services in the area and stated residents in the upper Stoney Creek-east Mountain community often find it difficult to get to the Athens Street food bank on the west Mountain.

Neighbour to Neighbour delivers food from the centre and its storage facility on Lancing Drive to the church. The church gymnasium is transformed into a food bank where users can shop for what they need, similar to a grocery store.

“This funding will help cover our costs for the Heritage Green Food Bank and ensure our continued commitment to deliver a reliable schedule of service to people in need and to remain available and welcoming for all who come to us for help,” stated Raymond.

He said the food bank provides about five days’ worth of food to every family that visits.

The food bank is open the first and third Friday of every month from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

“We understand that poverty brings great difficulty and barriers to fulfilling basic needs, and we feel it’s important for people to know that our food service is a springboard to many different resources,” said Raymond.

Upper Stoney Creek food bank gets $16,000 grant

News May 28, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Heritage Green Food Bank may have had a slow start when it first opened almost a year ago in June 2014.

But Neighbour to Neighbour officials were correct in predicting a demand for its services when they organized the satellite food bank in upper Stoney Creek at the Heritage Green Baptist Church on Paramount Drive.

Food Services Manager Mark Raymond said 72 families used the food bank during the six months it was open last year.

“Folks in upper Stoney Creek have been very supportive of our efforts to serve people in their neighbourhood,” Raymond stated.

After holding two food drives in 2014, the community raised 1,834 pounds of donations, he said.

“We hope to continue to get the message out to the community that people who need help will feel welcome using our service,” Raymond said.

At council’s May 13 meeting, politicians approved a motion introduced by Stoney Creek councillor Doug Conley to provide $16,000 from the former Newalta royalties reserve to the food bank.

The money will be used, said Raymond, for staffing, administration and warehousing costs. The food bank has a receptionist, who is a trained resource counsellor, and a driver who transports donated foods and materials.

The non-profit organization has two warehouse locations and two vehicles to process the estimated 700,000 pounds of food that is donated annually.

The church approached Neighbour to Neighbour about creating a food bank in upper Stoney Creek in late 2013 after a few of the parishioners said they needed food and wanted to know where to get it.

A Social Planning and Research Council of Hamilton 2012 study found there were about 6,600 individuals, about 35 per cent of whom were children, living below the poverty line in the upper Stoney Creek area.

The report noted a lack of food services in the area and stated residents in the upper Stoney Creek-east Mountain community often find it difficult to get to the Athens Street food bank on the west Mountain.

Neighbour to Neighbour delivers food from the centre and its storage facility on Lancing Drive to the church. The church gymnasium is transformed into a food bank where users can shop for what they need, similar to a grocery store.

“This funding will help cover our costs for the Heritage Green Food Bank and ensure our continued commitment to deliver a reliable schedule of service to people in need and to remain available and welcoming for all who come to us for help,” stated Raymond.

He said the food bank provides about five days’ worth of food to every family that visits.

The food bank is open the first and third Friday of every month from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

“We understand that poverty brings great difficulty and barriers to fulfilling basic needs, and we feel it’s important for people to know that our food service is a springboard to many different resources,” said Raymond.

Upper Stoney Creek food bank gets $16,000 grant

News May 28, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Heritage Green Food Bank may have had a slow start when it first opened almost a year ago in June 2014.

But Neighbour to Neighbour officials were correct in predicting a demand for its services when they organized the satellite food bank in upper Stoney Creek at the Heritage Green Baptist Church on Paramount Drive.

Food Services Manager Mark Raymond said 72 families used the food bank during the six months it was open last year.

“Folks in upper Stoney Creek have been very supportive of our efforts to serve people in their neighbourhood,” Raymond stated.

After holding two food drives in 2014, the community raised 1,834 pounds of donations, he said.

“We hope to continue to get the message out to the community that people who need help will feel welcome using our service,” Raymond said.

At council’s May 13 meeting, politicians approved a motion introduced by Stoney Creek councillor Doug Conley to provide $16,000 from the former Newalta royalties reserve to the food bank.

The money will be used, said Raymond, for staffing, administration and warehousing costs. The food bank has a receptionist, who is a trained resource counsellor, and a driver who transports donated foods and materials.

The non-profit organization has two warehouse locations and two vehicles to process the estimated 700,000 pounds of food that is donated annually.

The church approached Neighbour to Neighbour about creating a food bank in upper Stoney Creek in late 2013 after a few of the parishioners said they needed food and wanted to know where to get it.

A Social Planning and Research Council of Hamilton 2012 study found there were about 6,600 individuals, about 35 per cent of whom were children, living below the poverty line in the upper Stoney Creek area.

The report noted a lack of food services in the area and stated residents in the upper Stoney Creek-east Mountain community often find it difficult to get to the Athens Street food bank on the west Mountain.

Neighbour to Neighbour delivers food from the centre and its storage facility on Lancing Drive to the church. The church gymnasium is transformed into a food bank where users can shop for what they need, similar to a grocery store.

“This funding will help cover our costs for the Heritage Green Food Bank and ensure our continued commitment to deliver a reliable schedule of service to people in need and to remain available and welcoming for all who come to us for help,” stated Raymond.

He said the food bank provides about five days’ worth of food to every family that visits.

The food bank is open the first and third Friday of every month from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

“We understand that poverty brings great difficulty and barriers to fulfilling basic needs, and we feel it’s important for people to know that our food service is a springboard to many different resources,” said Raymond.