Hamilton staff examining safety issues along Linc

News May 24, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

A Hamilton study examining how to improve the safety of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway could include installing barriers in the median or on the sides along a portion of the 11.3 km roadway.

Dave Ferguson, superintendent of traffic engineering, told public works committee members May 21 that a consultant, hired to review the safety of the roadway, is expected to complete the report by July, with possible recommendations submitted to councillors by the end of the summer.

Ferguson said the consultant is conducting an “extensive review” on whether to install barriers in the grassy median to prevent vehicles from crossing over into oncoming traffic, and guardrails. There are no barriers, or guardrails along the Linc.

Councillors who represent wards bordering the Red Hill Valley Parkway and  the Lincoln Alexander Parkway, have received numerous emails and other messages from residents urging the city to improve the safety of both roadways.

Those ideas can’t come quick enough for Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall, who has highlighted the increasing frequency of serious collisions along the Linc.

“There are so many accidents,” said Duvall, who along with other mountain councillors, asked city staff a few years ago to examine the safety of the Linc.

“Almost on every second day there is an accident,” he said.

Duvall, who acknowledged he didn’t know the consultant’s report on the Linc was being prepared, said the most serious area for accidents seems to be the Garth Street and Golf Links Road junction.

The Lincoln Alexander Parkway study was prompted in part by city traffic staff by the death of two Burlington teens last October. Aaron Haire, 18, and Kristine Williams, 19, were killed when the east-bound Cavalier they were driving in left the road near the Garth Street overpass and veered across the grassy median, colliding with two other vehicles.

Ferguson said since the Linc opened in 1997, there have been 131 incidents, with 45 vehicles crossing the median, resulting in three deaths.

Duvall said there is something about that Garth Street area and seems to create an environment for collisions.

City statistics reveal that one out of every four of those collisions occurred in the Garth Street and Golf Links Road area.

“We have to do something constructive,” says Duvall. “There is something wrong when cars are going from one side of the highway to the other.”

Hamilton staff examining safety issues along Linc

News May 24, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

A Hamilton study examining how to improve the safety of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway could include installing barriers in the median or on the sides along a portion of the 11.3 km roadway.

Dave Ferguson, superintendent of traffic engineering, told public works committee members May 21 that a consultant, hired to review the safety of the roadway, is expected to complete the report by July, with possible recommendations submitted to councillors by the end of the summer.

Ferguson said the consultant is conducting an “extensive review” on whether to install barriers in the grassy median to prevent vehicles from crossing over into oncoming traffic, and guardrails. There are no barriers, or guardrails along the Linc.

Councillors who represent wards bordering the Red Hill Valley Parkway and  the Lincoln Alexander Parkway, have received numerous emails and other messages from residents urging the city to improve the safety of both roadways.

Those ideas can’t come quick enough for Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall, who has highlighted the increasing frequency of serious collisions along the Linc.

“There are so many accidents,” said Duvall, who along with other mountain councillors, asked city staff a few years ago to examine the safety of the Linc.

“Almost on every second day there is an accident,” he said.

Duvall, who acknowledged he didn’t know the consultant’s report on the Linc was being prepared, said the most serious area for accidents seems to be the Garth Street and Golf Links Road junction.

The Lincoln Alexander Parkway study was prompted in part by city traffic staff by the death of two Burlington teens last October. Aaron Haire, 18, and Kristine Williams, 19, were killed when the east-bound Cavalier they were driving in left the road near the Garth Street overpass and veered across the grassy median, colliding with two other vehicles.

Ferguson said since the Linc opened in 1997, there have been 131 incidents, with 45 vehicles crossing the median, resulting in three deaths.

Duvall said there is something about that Garth Street area and seems to create an environment for collisions.

City statistics reveal that one out of every four of those collisions occurred in the Garth Street and Golf Links Road area.

“We have to do something constructive,” says Duvall. “There is something wrong when cars are going from one side of the highway to the other.”

Hamilton staff examining safety issues along Linc

News May 24, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

A Hamilton study examining how to improve the safety of the Lincoln Alexander Parkway could include installing barriers in the median or on the sides along a portion of the 11.3 km roadway.

Dave Ferguson, superintendent of traffic engineering, told public works committee members May 21 that a consultant, hired to review the safety of the roadway, is expected to complete the report by July, with possible recommendations submitted to councillors by the end of the summer.

Ferguson said the consultant is conducting an “extensive review” on whether to install barriers in the grassy median to prevent vehicles from crossing over into oncoming traffic, and guardrails. There are no barriers, or guardrails along the Linc.

Councillors who represent wards bordering the Red Hill Valley Parkway and  the Lincoln Alexander Parkway, have received numerous emails and other messages from residents urging the city to improve the safety of both roadways.

Those ideas can’t come quick enough for Ward 7 councillor Scott Duvall, who has highlighted the increasing frequency of serious collisions along the Linc.

“There are so many accidents,” said Duvall, who along with other mountain councillors, asked city staff a few years ago to examine the safety of the Linc.

“Almost on every second day there is an accident,” he said.

Duvall, who acknowledged he didn’t know the consultant’s report on the Linc was being prepared, said the most serious area for accidents seems to be the Garth Street and Golf Links Road junction.

The Lincoln Alexander Parkway study was prompted in part by city traffic staff by the death of two Burlington teens last October. Aaron Haire, 18, and Kristine Williams, 19, were killed when the east-bound Cavalier they were driving in left the road near the Garth Street overpass and veered across the grassy median, colliding with two other vehicles.

Ferguson said since the Linc opened in 1997, there have been 131 incidents, with 45 vehicles crossing the median, resulting in three deaths.

Duvall said there is something about that Garth Street area and seems to create an environment for collisions.

City statistics reveal that one out of every four of those collisions occurred in the Garth Street and Golf Links Road area.

“We have to do something constructive,” says Duvall. “There is something wrong when cars are going from one side of the highway to the other.”