Flamborough de-amalgamation group wants Hamilton to stop boundary review

News May 20, 2015 by Kevin Werner Flamborough Review

The chair of the Flamborough de-amalgamation committee had an easy path at the May 20 government issues committee meeting when he presented two petitions to Hamilton councillors that asked for a review of amalgamation, and for the city to halt the ward boundary review it has started.

Roman Sarachman, of the Committee to Free Flamborough, wants the city to conduct a “hard assessment” on amalgamation and its effects on the community. In addition, the city should stop any boundary review now underway, he said. But if council is determined to revise the ward boundaries, then any recommended changes to the wards should be done to benefit both urban and suburban areas.

Sarachman presented two petitions signed by 1,000 Flamborough residents each, to the committee.

“The growth is happening in Glanbrook and Flamborough,” said Sarachman, while the growth is not occurring in downtown Hamilton.

The Committee to Free Flamborough was formed in 2003 with the intention to de-amalgamate Flamborough from the rest of the new city of Hamilton. The organization has lobbied Hamilton council and the provincial government to hold a referendum on de-amalgamation. But the province and council have not agreed to the committee’s requests.

The Carlisle resident says Flamborough residents are paying three times the amount of taxes as urban Hamiltonians. And as the city’s debt climbs close to $1 billion, Sarachman says it will be suburban residents who will pay the most to cut that debt.

“Suburban citizens are paying more in taxes,” said Sarachman.

He also questioned the reasoning behind why the city has hired over 1,800 people since amalgamation. And he pointed out more city employees, who are making over $100,000, are appearing on the provincial government’s Sunshine List each year. He said amalgamation was supposed to eliminate waste and streamline government.

“You need to spend less and save more,” said Sarachman.

Once his five-minute presentation was over, no councillor made a comment or asked him a question.

“It was very surprising,” said Sarachman afterwards. “My take is they knew what I was going to say. They have seen it before.”

He says that councillors are fearful of following through on a ward boundary review, which Hamilton staff is currently conducting. Public meetings are scheduled to begin later this year.

“There is an urban-suburban split and it’s getting worse,” he said. “(Councillors) know it will be a risk.”

Sarachman also doesn’t believe Mayor Fred Eisenberger wants to conduct a review of amalgamation.

But that won’t stop him from urging politicians to hold a review.

“I will take it public, and talk to the media about it,” said Sarachman.

 

Flamborough de-amalgamation group wants Hamilton to stop boundary review

News May 20, 2015 by Kevin Werner Flamborough Review

The chair of the Flamborough de-amalgamation committee had an easy path at the May 20 government issues committee meeting when he presented two petitions to Hamilton councillors that asked for a review of amalgamation, and for the city to halt the ward boundary review it has started.

Roman Sarachman, of the Committee to Free Flamborough, wants the city to conduct a “hard assessment” on amalgamation and its effects on the community. In addition, the city should stop any boundary review now underway, he said. But if council is determined to revise the ward boundaries, then any recommended changes to the wards should be done to benefit both urban and suburban areas.

Sarachman presented two petitions signed by 1,000 Flamborough residents each, to the committee.

“The growth is happening in Glanbrook and Flamborough,” said Sarachman, while the growth is not occurring in downtown Hamilton.

The Committee to Free Flamborough was formed in 2003 with the intention to de-amalgamate Flamborough from the rest of the new city of Hamilton. The organization has lobbied Hamilton council and the provincial government to hold a referendum on de-amalgamation. But the province and council have not agreed to the committee’s requests.

The Carlisle resident says Flamborough residents are paying three times the amount of taxes as urban Hamiltonians. And as the city’s debt climbs close to $1 billion, Sarachman says it will be suburban residents who will pay the most to cut that debt.

“Suburban citizens are paying more in taxes,” said Sarachman.

He also questioned the reasoning behind why the city has hired over 1,800 people since amalgamation. And he pointed out more city employees, who are making over $100,000, are appearing on the provincial government’s Sunshine List each year. He said amalgamation was supposed to eliminate waste and streamline government.

“You need to spend less and save more,” said Sarachman.

Once his five-minute presentation was over, no councillor made a comment or asked him a question.

“It was very surprising,” said Sarachman afterwards. “My take is they knew what I was going to say. They have seen it before.”

He says that councillors are fearful of following through on a ward boundary review, which Hamilton staff is currently conducting. Public meetings are scheduled to begin later this year.

“There is an urban-suburban split and it’s getting worse,” he said. “(Councillors) know it will be a risk.”

Sarachman also doesn’t believe Mayor Fred Eisenberger wants to conduct a review of amalgamation.

But that won’t stop him from urging politicians to hold a review.

“I will take it public, and talk to the media about it,” said Sarachman.

 

Flamborough de-amalgamation group wants Hamilton to stop boundary review

News May 20, 2015 by Kevin Werner Flamborough Review

The chair of the Flamborough de-amalgamation committee had an easy path at the May 20 government issues committee meeting when he presented two petitions to Hamilton councillors that asked for a review of amalgamation, and for the city to halt the ward boundary review it has started.

Roman Sarachman, of the Committee to Free Flamborough, wants the city to conduct a “hard assessment” on amalgamation and its effects on the community. In addition, the city should stop any boundary review now underway, he said. But if council is determined to revise the ward boundaries, then any recommended changes to the wards should be done to benefit both urban and suburban areas.

Sarachman presented two petitions signed by 1,000 Flamborough residents each, to the committee.

“The growth is happening in Glanbrook and Flamborough,” said Sarachman, while the growth is not occurring in downtown Hamilton.

The Committee to Free Flamborough was formed in 2003 with the intention to de-amalgamate Flamborough from the rest of the new city of Hamilton. The organization has lobbied Hamilton council and the provincial government to hold a referendum on de-amalgamation. But the province and council have not agreed to the committee’s requests.

The Carlisle resident says Flamborough residents are paying three times the amount of taxes as urban Hamiltonians. And as the city’s debt climbs close to $1 billion, Sarachman says it will be suburban residents who will pay the most to cut that debt.

“Suburban citizens are paying more in taxes,” said Sarachman.

He also questioned the reasoning behind why the city has hired over 1,800 people since amalgamation. And he pointed out more city employees, who are making over $100,000, are appearing on the provincial government’s Sunshine List each year. He said amalgamation was supposed to eliminate waste and streamline government.

“You need to spend less and save more,” said Sarachman.

Once his five-minute presentation was over, no councillor made a comment or asked him a question.

“It was very surprising,” said Sarachman afterwards. “My take is they knew what I was going to say. They have seen it before.”

He says that councillors are fearful of following through on a ward boundary review, which Hamilton staff is currently conducting. Public meetings are scheduled to begin later this year.

“There is an urban-suburban split and it’s getting worse,” he said. “(Councillors) know it will be a risk.”

Sarachman also doesn’t believe Mayor Fred Eisenberger wants to conduct a review of amalgamation.

But that won’t stop him from urging politicians to hold a review.

“I will take it public, and talk to the media about it,” said Sarachman.