Hamilton councillors looking for safety upgrades on Red Hill Parkway

News May 14, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton councillors are proposing to install additional safety measures on the Red Hill Valley Parkway after a recent crash that killed two women.

Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla and Ward 4 councillor Chad Collins will be introducing a motion at the May 21 public works committee meeting that would have public works staff examine how to improve the roadway’s safety. A few of the ideas proposed include installing guardrails, improving the lighting along the roadway, and painting new lane markings on the roadway. The motion requests that staff review the motion and report back to the public works committee sometime in 2015.

“We are not saying the highway is not safe,” said Merulla. “But we would like to constantly review the safety measures on the Red Hill, to make assessments and do preventative measures.”

The Red Hill Parkway has come under criticism over the years from residents saying the lighting is poor especially at the top of the parkway.

In addition, the road’s safety has been under further scrutiny after the recent deaths of two women, believed to be 19, Olivia Smosarski and Jordyn Hastings, who were killed at night May 6 when their 2007 Mazda crossed the grassy median near Greenhill Avenue and collided with a 2011 Honda mini-van.

Smosarski went to Bishop Tonnos High School, while Hastings attended St. Thomas More.

The last fatal crash on the Red Hill occurred in 2012 when police said speed and weather conditions contributed to a collision that killed a couple in their 60s when they were driving a Toyota Echo southbound near the Barton Street on ramp and collided with a delivery truck.

In 2013 city staff conducted a safety audit of the Red Hill and recommended installations of reflective “cat’s eyes” pavement markers. The markers were installed earlier this year at a cost of about $234,520 from Greenhill to Dartnall.

In 2013 Collins and Mountain councillor Tom Jackson introduced a motion to improve the safety of the parkway, such as better lane markings and different coloured paint.  Collins said the parkway is especially precarious during heavy rains and snowstorms.

Merulla says the most recent motion “builds upon” the city’s safety audit and suggests all measures should be looked at.

One of the issues motorists bring up is how dark the top of Red Hill Parkway is. It is especially dark at the top of the Red Hill where it meets the Lincoln Alexander Parkway.

 City staff says the limited illumination was purposely done to prevent distracting the migrating birds.

“When we consulted with the stakeholders, the environmental groups said more lighting would hurt the birds,” said Merulla. “We still want to talk to the stakeholders and work out a compromise with them.”

 

Hamilton councillors looking for safety upgrades on Red Hill Parkway

News May 14, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton councillors are proposing to install additional safety measures on the Red Hill Valley Parkway after a recent crash that killed two women.

Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla and Ward 4 councillor Chad Collins will be introducing a motion at the May 21 public works committee meeting that would have public works staff examine how to improve the roadway’s safety. A few of the ideas proposed include installing guardrails, improving the lighting along the roadway, and painting new lane markings on the roadway. The motion requests that staff review the motion and report back to the public works committee sometime in 2015.

“We are not saying the highway is not safe,” said Merulla. “But we would like to constantly review the safety measures on the Red Hill, to make assessments and do preventative measures.”

The Red Hill Parkway has come under criticism over the years from residents saying the lighting is poor especially at the top of the parkway.

In addition, the road’s safety has been under further scrutiny after the recent deaths of two women, believed to be 19, Olivia Smosarski and Jordyn Hastings, who were killed at night May 6 when their 2007 Mazda crossed the grassy median near Greenhill Avenue and collided with a 2011 Honda mini-van.

Smosarski went to Bishop Tonnos High School, while Hastings attended St. Thomas More.

The last fatal crash on the Red Hill occurred in 2012 when police said speed and weather conditions contributed to a collision that killed a couple in their 60s when they were driving a Toyota Echo southbound near the Barton Street on ramp and collided with a delivery truck.

In 2013 city staff conducted a safety audit of the Red Hill and recommended installations of reflective “cat’s eyes” pavement markers. The markers were installed earlier this year at a cost of about $234,520 from Greenhill to Dartnall.

In 2013 Collins and Mountain councillor Tom Jackson introduced a motion to improve the safety of the parkway, such as better lane markings and different coloured paint.  Collins said the parkway is especially precarious during heavy rains and snowstorms.

Merulla says the most recent motion “builds upon” the city’s safety audit and suggests all measures should be looked at.

One of the issues motorists bring up is how dark the top of Red Hill Parkway is. It is especially dark at the top of the Red Hill where it meets the Lincoln Alexander Parkway.

 City staff says the limited illumination was purposely done to prevent distracting the migrating birds.

“When we consulted with the stakeholders, the environmental groups said more lighting would hurt the birds,” said Merulla. “We still want to talk to the stakeholders and work out a compromise with them.”

 

Hamilton councillors looking for safety upgrades on Red Hill Parkway

News May 14, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton councillors are proposing to install additional safety measures on the Red Hill Valley Parkway after a recent crash that killed two women.

Ward 4 councillor Sam Merulla and Ward 4 councillor Chad Collins will be introducing a motion at the May 21 public works committee meeting that would have public works staff examine how to improve the roadway’s safety. A few of the ideas proposed include installing guardrails, improving the lighting along the roadway, and painting new lane markings on the roadway. The motion requests that staff review the motion and report back to the public works committee sometime in 2015.

“We are not saying the highway is not safe,” said Merulla. “But we would like to constantly review the safety measures on the Red Hill, to make assessments and do preventative measures.”

The Red Hill Parkway has come under criticism over the years from residents saying the lighting is poor especially at the top of the parkway.

In addition, the road’s safety has been under further scrutiny after the recent deaths of two women, believed to be 19, Olivia Smosarski and Jordyn Hastings, who were killed at night May 6 when their 2007 Mazda crossed the grassy median near Greenhill Avenue and collided with a 2011 Honda mini-van.

Smosarski went to Bishop Tonnos High School, while Hastings attended St. Thomas More.

The last fatal crash on the Red Hill occurred in 2012 when police said speed and weather conditions contributed to a collision that killed a couple in their 60s when they were driving a Toyota Echo southbound near the Barton Street on ramp and collided with a delivery truck.

In 2013 city staff conducted a safety audit of the Red Hill and recommended installations of reflective “cat’s eyes” pavement markers. The markers were installed earlier this year at a cost of about $234,520 from Greenhill to Dartnall.

In 2013 Collins and Mountain councillor Tom Jackson introduced a motion to improve the safety of the parkway, such as better lane markings and different coloured paint.  Collins said the parkway is especially precarious during heavy rains and snowstorms.

Merulla says the most recent motion “builds upon” the city’s safety audit and suggests all measures should be looked at.

One of the issues motorists bring up is how dark the top of Red Hill Parkway is. It is especially dark at the top of the Red Hill where it meets the Lincoln Alexander Parkway.

 City staff says the limited illumination was purposely done to prevent distracting the migrating birds.

“When we consulted with the stakeholders, the environmental groups said more lighting would hurt the birds,” said Merulla. “We still want to talk to the stakeholders and work out a compromise with them.”