iPad pilot points to leasing as better way, Hamilton trustees told

News May 14, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Students can at times be forgetful about where they left their iPads, but the bigger problem is how often they lose their charger cords.

That’s among the lessons from the introduction of computer tablets at nine Hamilton public schools last fall as part of a five-year plan to provide them to every student in grades 4 to 12.

Another is that it may make more sense to lease the tablets given the built-in obsolescence of computer devices and ability to allow non-Apple providers to bid on the contract.

Executive superintendent Manny Figueiredo said last fall’s launch tested that theory by buying the iPads for Nora Henderson and Mountain secondary schools and leasing them for seven elementary schools in the lower city.

Leasing won out, including because the supplier provided all of the device’s setup, saving staff time and money, he told members of the board’s finance and facilities committee.

“There’s no difference in price and we know that we have a sort of built-in refresh in three or four years,” Figueiredo said. “We’re not stuck with old technology five years from now that’s piling up.”

Trustees are being urged to lease tablets from hereon in, including those for classroom use to be introduced in grades 4 and 5 at all schools this fall.

Overall, the public board expects to spend $1.3 million next year — $466,000 of it on leasing — a figure projected to rise to $3.5 million by the fifth year of the program, dubbed Transforming Learning Everywhere.

Treasurer Stacey Zucker said among the surprises of the initial rollout is the high number of students who lost their charger cords, the lion’s share of a budgeted $40,000 for replacement of damaged equipment.

She said the board presently replaces them with a free, cheaper version but is expected to return any leased iPads with an Apple charger.

“In the same way that if somebody were to lose their textbook (and) we charge a replacement cost for the textbook, we’re looking at the possibility of charging a replacement cost for the chargers,” she said.

Paul Hatala, a 21st century learning consultant, said lost or stolen iPads haven’t been an issue so far because the board has software that can track them down and, in the case of theft, render them unusable.

“If a student comes in and says, ‘I’ve lost my iPad,’ we can actually figure out where it might be located,” he said. “It ends up being in the locker, at mom’s house, at their friend’s house.”

Hatala said the software also lets the board know if students have downloaded any unauthorized apps and remove them, something those who tried to “jailbreak” the iPads quickly learned within days of receiving them.

“We haven’t been seeing that same reoccurrence of the problem,” he said. “The message does get out there, ‘The board really does know what’s on these devices.’”

iPad pilot points to leasing as better way, Hamilton trustees told

News May 14, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Students can at times be forgetful about where they left their iPads, but the bigger problem is how often they lose their charger cords.

That’s among the lessons from the introduction of computer tablets at nine Hamilton public schools last fall as part of a five-year plan to provide them to every student in grades 4 to 12.

Another is that it may make more sense to lease the tablets given the built-in obsolescence of computer devices and ability to allow non-Apple providers to bid on the contract.

Executive superintendent Manny Figueiredo said last fall’s launch tested that theory by buying the iPads for Nora Henderson and Mountain secondary schools and leasing them for seven elementary schools in the lower city.

"We’re looking at the possibility of charging a replacement cost for the chargers.”

Leasing won out, including because the supplier provided all of the device’s setup, saving staff time and money, he told members of the board’s finance and facilities committee.

“There’s no difference in price and we know that we have a sort of built-in refresh in three or four years,” Figueiredo said. “We’re not stuck with old technology five years from now that’s piling up.”

Trustees are being urged to lease tablets from hereon in, including those for classroom use to be introduced in grades 4 and 5 at all schools this fall.

Overall, the public board expects to spend $1.3 million next year — $466,000 of it on leasing — a figure projected to rise to $3.5 million by the fifth year of the program, dubbed Transforming Learning Everywhere.

Treasurer Stacey Zucker said among the surprises of the initial rollout is the high number of students who lost their charger cords, the lion’s share of a budgeted $40,000 for replacement of damaged equipment.

She said the board presently replaces them with a free, cheaper version but is expected to return any leased iPads with an Apple charger.

“In the same way that if somebody were to lose their textbook (and) we charge a replacement cost for the textbook, we’re looking at the possibility of charging a replacement cost for the chargers,” she said.

Paul Hatala, a 21st century learning consultant, said lost or stolen iPads haven’t been an issue so far because the board has software that can track them down and, in the case of theft, render them unusable.

“If a student comes in and says, ‘I’ve lost my iPad,’ we can actually figure out where it might be located,” he said. “It ends up being in the locker, at mom’s house, at their friend’s house.”

Hatala said the software also lets the board know if students have downloaded any unauthorized apps and remove them, something those who tried to “jailbreak” the iPads quickly learned within days of receiving them.

“We haven’t been seeing that same reoccurrence of the problem,” he said. “The message does get out there, ‘The board really does know what’s on these devices.’”

iPad pilot points to leasing as better way, Hamilton trustees told

News May 14, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Students can at times be forgetful about where they left their iPads, but the bigger problem is how often they lose their charger cords.

That’s among the lessons from the introduction of computer tablets at nine Hamilton public schools last fall as part of a five-year plan to provide them to every student in grades 4 to 12.

Another is that it may make more sense to lease the tablets given the built-in obsolescence of computer devices and ability to allow non-Apple providers to bid on the contract.

Executive superintendent Manny Figueiredo said last fall’s launch tested that theory by buying the iPads for Nora Henderson and Mountain secondary schools and leasing them for seven elementary schools in the lower city.

"We’re looking at the possibility of charging a replacement cost for the chargers.”

Leasing won out, including because the supplier provided all of the device’s setup, saving staff time and money, he told members of the board’s finance and facilities committee.

“There’s no difference in price and we know that we have a sort of built-in refresh in three or four years,” Figueiredo said. “We’re not stuck with old technology five years from now that’s piling up.”

Trustees are being urged to lease tablets from hereon in, including those for classroom use to be introduced in grades 4 and 5 at all schools this fall.

Overall, the public board expects to spend $1.3 million next year — $466,000 of it on leasing — a figure projected to rise to $3.5 million by the fifth year of the program, dubbed Transforming Learning Everywhere.

Treasurer Stacey Zucker said among the surprises of the initial rollout is the high number of students who lost their charger cords, the lion’s share of a budgeted $40,000 for replacement of damaged equipment.

She said the board presently replaces them with a free, cheaper version but is expected to return any leased iPads with an Apple charger.

“In the same way that if somebody were to lose their textbook (and) we charge a replacement cost for the textbook, we’re looking at the possibility of charging a replacement cost for the chargers,” she said.

Paul Hatala, a 21st century learning consultant, said lost or stolen iPads haven’t been an issue so far because the board has software that can track them down and, in the case of theft, render them unusable.

“If a student comes in and says, ‘I’ve lost my iPad,’ we can actually figure out where it might be located,” he said. “It ends up being in the locker, at mom’s house, at their friend’s house.”

Hatala said the software also lets the board know if students have downloaded any unauthorized apps and remove them, something those who tried to “jailbreak” the iPads quickly learned within days of receiving them.

“We haven’t been seeing that same reoccurrence of the problem,” he said. “The message does get out there, ‘The board really does know what’s on these devices.’”