Hamilton councillors delay approving funds to arts, community groups

News May 08, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton’s arts and other community and sports organizations will have to wait a little longer before officially knowing how much they will be getting from the city under its revamped grants program.

The grants sub-committee tabled at its May 8 meeting how it will allocate over $5.4 million to various organizations. A few councillors wanted more information from staff about where the extra $500,000 in arts funding, and an additional $250,000 in other community grant money was going to various groups.

The $750,000 had been approved by council this year as part of the 2015 budget after an outcry from various community and arts organizations the funding model was broken.

After nearly an hour waiting for city staff to provide the updated information, committee members, including councillors Matthew Green, Tom Jackson, Arlene VanderBeek and Lloyd Ferguson, were still not satisfied with the information provided.

“This is a lot of money we are deciding on,” said Ferguson. “I don’t want to do this on the fly.”

But Green remained reluctant to abandon the meeting. He said some organizations, especially those who are receiving city money for the first time, may find it difficult to wait.

“This (money) could be a make it or break it,” he said.

The committee ultimately decided to reschedule the grants sub-committee meeting to May 15 at noon at City Hall.

Under the new model, called the Community Enrichment Fund, city staff is proposing to distribute over $5.4 million to 244 arts, community and sports groups to help them hold various local festivals, events and offer programs to residents.

About $2.1 million is being earmarked for arts groups, while $2.2 million will be distributed to community service organizations. Just over $700,000 is expected to be allocated to community organizations, culture and heritage groups, and nearly $300,000 will be provided to sports groups. Agricultural organizations will receive the lowest amount of funding at $12,375. There is a $53,326 contingency built into the budget this year.

There is also a grant reserve of nearly $440,000 left over from last year’s surplus of funding.

John Hertel, director of finance, administration and revenue generation, said a few for profit organizations were dropped from receiving any city money this year, while no group is expected to receive more than 30 per cent of their budget in funding for the city.

He said the extra half million for arts funding, and $250,000 in community money has been distributed to about 37 groups, including a number of new organizations.

Hertel said 2015 is a “transition” year for all organizations receiving city funding.

“We are starting fresh (in 2015) with a zero-based approach,” said Hertel, who began reviewing how the city distributed money to organizations in January 2014, and cobbled together the new funding model.

 

 

Hamilton councillors delay approving funds to arts, community groups

News May 08, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton’s arts and other community and sports organizations will have to wait a little longer before officially knowing how much they will be getting from the city under its revamped grants program.

The grants sub-committee tabled at its May 8 meeting how it will allocate over $5.4 million to various organizations. A few councillors wanted more information from staff about where the extra $500,000 in arts funding, and an additional $250,000 in other community grant money was going to various groups.

The $750,000 had been approved by council this year as part of the 2015 budget after an outcry from various community and arts organizations the funding model was broken.

After nearly an hour waiting for city staff to provide the updated information, committee members, including councillors Matthew Green, Tom Jackson, Arlene VanderBeek and Lloyd Ferguson, were still not satisfied with the information provided.

“This is a lot of money we are deciding on,” said Ferguson. “I don’t want to do this on the fly.”

But Green remained reluctant to abandon the meeting. He said some organizations, especially those who are receiving city money for the first time, may find it difficult to wait.

“This (money) could be a make it or break it,” he said.

The committee ultimately decided to reschedule the grants sub-committee meeting to May 15 at noon at City Hall.

Under the new model, called the Community Enrichment Fund, city staff is proposing to distribute over $5.4 million to 244 arts, community and sports groups to help them hold various local festivals, events and offer programs to residents.

About $2.1 million is being earmarked for arts groups, while $2.2 million will be distributed to community service organizations. Just over $700,000 is expected to be allocated to community organizations, culture and heritage groups, and nearly $300,000 will be provided to sports groups. Agricultural organizations will receive the lowest amount of funding at $12,375. There is a $53,326 contingency built into the budget this year.

There is also a grant reserve of nearly $440,000 left over from last year’s surplus of funding.

John Hertel, director of finance, administration and revenue generation, said a few for profit organizations were dropped from receiving any city money this year, while no group is expected to receive more than 30 per cent of their budget in funding for the city.

He said the extra half million for arts funding, and $250,000 in community money has been distributed to about 37 groups, including a number of new organizations.

Hertel said 2015 is a “transition” year for all organizations receiving city funding.

“We are starting fresh (in 2015) with a zero-based approach,” said Hertel, who began reviewing how the city distributed money to organizations in January 2014, and cobbled together the new funding model.

 

 

Hamilton councillors delay approving funds to arts, community groups

News May 08, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton’s arts and other community and sports organizations will have to wait a little longer before officially knowing how much they will be getting from the city under its revamped grants program.

The grants sub-committee tabled at its May 8 meeting how it will allocate over $5.4 million to various organizations. A few councillors wanted more information from staff about where the extra $500,000 in arts funding, and an additional $250,000 in other community grant money was going to various groups.

The $750,000 had been approved by council this year as part of the 2015 budget after an outcry from various community and arts organizations the funding model was broken.

After nearly an hour waiting for city staff to provide the updated information, committee members, including councillors Matthew Green, Tom Jackson, Arlene VanderBeek and Lloyd Ferguson, were still not satisfied with the information provided.

“This is a lot of money we are deciding on,” said Ferguson. “I don’t want to do this on the fly.”

But Green remained reluctant to abandon the meeting. He said some organizations, especially those who are receiving city money for the first time, may find it difficult to wait.

“This (money) could be a make it or break it,” he said.

The committee ultimately decided to reschedule the grants sub-committee meeting to May 15 at noon at City Hall.

Under the new model, called the Community Enrichment Fund, city staff is proposing to distribute over $5.4 million to 244 arts, community and sports groups to help them hold various local festivals, events and offer programs to residents.

About $2.1 million is being earmarked for arts groups, while $2.2 million will be distributed to community service organizations. Just over $700,000 is expected to be allocated to community organizations, culture and heritage groups, and nearly $300,000 will be provided to sports groups. Agricultural organizations will receive the lowest amount of funding at $12,375. There is a $53,326 contingency built into the budget this year.

There is also a grant reserve of nearly $440,000 left over from last year’s surplus of funding.

John Hertel, director of finance, administration and revenue generation, said a few for profit organizations were dropped from receiving any city money this year, while no group is expected to receive more than 30 per cent of their budget in funding for the city.

He said the extra half million for arts funding, and $250,000 in community money has been distributed to about 37 groups, including a number of new organizations.

Hertel said 2015 is a “transition” year for all organizations receiving city funding.

“We are starting fresh (in 2015) with a zero-based approach,” said Hertel, who began reviewing how the city distributed money to organizations in January 2014, and cobbled together the new funding model.