Labour of love

News May 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Twenty years ago, their cookbook gained national recognition.

This month, the makers of the Healthy Living Traditional Italian Recipes cookbook are commemorating the time they were featured in Chatelaine magazine.

“I’m proud of what we did,” says Lidia Mosna, president of the Vivere Sani Social Club.

The cookbook started in 1992 as an outreach project supported by the office of David Christopherson, then MPP for Hamilton Centre. Maria Massi, his constituency assistant, facilitated a weekly meeting of Italian Canadian seniors at the Venetian Club.

The seniors expressed an interest in learning more about eating healthier in order to address medical issues such as high blood pressure, diabetes and weight management. They wanted to keep their favourite traditional recipes, so Massi contacted Pat Elliott-Moyer, a nutritionist in Hamilton’s pubic health department, to see how they might reduce salt or fat while keeping the taste. They weren’t unhealthy recipes by any means, but they did need to change to fit into a modern healthy lifestyle.

Over the course of two years, hundreds of hours of work was put into converting the recipes from Italian to English and from whatever units were being used — many recipes handed down over the years didn’t use traditional cups and tablespoons — to standardized measurements. At some point, it was decided to publish a cookbook for the masses.

Many hours were spent — and many dishes were tasted — deciding which recipes would make the final cut.

”Tables and tables of stuff to include,” recalls Velia Slaviero, the first president of the Vivere Sani Social Club.

Her contributions to the book include apricot cake, rice primavera and cod with parsley and garlic.

“We could have had a million recipes in there,” says Elliott-Moyer.

“It was good to get together to show what we could do,” says Mosna, whose spinach potato roll and four seasons pizza are featured in the book.

The Vivere Sani Social Club is an extension of the cookbook, with the new friendships resulting in the desire to meet regularly for non-food time.

Membership has declined over the years, but “we’re still going,” says Mosna.

There are still a few copies of the Healthy Living Traditional Italian Recipes cookbook available. They can be picked up when the Vivere Sani Social Club meets, Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. at the Venetian Club, 269 John St. North.

Labour of love

Healthy Living Traditional Italian Recipes cookbook marks special anniversary

News May 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Twenty years ago, their cookbook gained national recognition.

This month, the makers of the Healthy Living Traditional Italian Recipes cookbook are commemorating the time they were featured in Chatelaine magazine.

“I’m proud of what we did,” says Lidia Mosna, president of the Vivere Sani Social Club.

The cookbook started in 1992 as an outreach project supported by the office of David Christopherson, then MPP for Hamilton Centre. Maria Massi, his constituency assistant, facilitated a weekly meeting of Italian Canadian seniors at the Venetian Club.

We could have had a million recipes in there.

The seniors expressed an interest in learning more about eating healthier in order to address medical issues such as high blood pressure, diabetes and weight management. They wanted to keep their favourite traditional recipes, so Massi contacted Pat Elliott-Moyer, a nutritionist in Hamilton’s pubic health department, to see how they might reduce salt or fat while keeping the taste. They weren’t unhealthy recipes by any means, but they did need to change to fit into a modern healthy lifestyle.

Over the course of two years, hundreds of hours of work was put into converting the recipes from Italian to English and from whatever units were being used — many recipes handed down over the years didn’t use traditional cups and tablespoons — to standardized measurements. At some point, it was decided to publish a cookbook for the masses.

Many hours were spent — and many dishes were tasted — deciding which recipes would make the final cut.

”Tables and tables of stuff to include,” recalls Velia Slaviero, the first president of the Vivere Sani Social Club.

Her contributions to the book include apricot cake, rice primavera and cod with parsley and garlic.

“We could have had a million recipes in there,” says Elliott-Moyer.

“It was good to get together to show what we could do,” says Mosna, whose spinach potato roll and four seasons pizza are featured in the book.

The Vivere Sani Social Club is an extension of the cookbook, with the new friendships resulting in the desire to meet regularly for non-food time.

Membership has declined over the years, but “we’re still going,” says Mosna.

There are still a few copies of the Healthy Living Traditional Italian Recipes cookbook available. They can be picked up when the Vivere Sani Social Club meets, Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. at the Venetian Club, 269 John St. North.

Labour of love

Healthy Living Traditional Italian Recipes cookbook marks special anniversary

News May 07, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Twenty years ago, their cookbook gained national recognition.

This month, the makers of the Healthy Living Traditional Italian Recipes cookbook are commemorating the time they were featured in Chatelaine magazine.

“I’m proud of what we did,” says Lidia Mosna, president of the Vivere Sani Social Club.

The cookbook started in 1992 as an outreach project supported by the office of David Christopherson, then MPP for Hamilton Centre. Maria Massi, his constituency assistant, facilitated a weekly meeting of Italian Canadian seniors at the Venetian Club.

We could have had a million recipes in there.

The seniors expressed an interest in learning more about eating healthier in order to address medical issues such as high blood pressure, diabetes and weight management. They wanted to keep their favourite traditional recipes, so Massi contacted Pat Elliott-Moyer, a nutritionist in Hamilton’s pubic health department, to see how they might reduce salt or fat while keeping the taste. They weren’t unhealthy recipes by any means, but they did need to change to fit into a modern healthy lifestyle.

Over the course of two years, hundreds of hours of work was put into converting the recipes from Italian to English and from whatever units were being used — many recipes handed down over the years didn’t use traditional cups and tablespoons — to standardized measurements. At some point, it was decided to publish a cookbook for the masses.

Many hours were spent — and many dishes were tasted — deciding which recipes would make the final cut.

”Tables and tables of stuff to include,” recalls Velia Slaviero, the first president of the Vivere Sani Social Club.

Her contributions to the book include apricot cake, rice primavera and cod with parsley and garlic.

“We could have had a million recipes in there,” says Elliott-Moyer.

“It was good to get together to show what we could do,” says Mosna, whose spinach potato roll and four seasons pizza are featured in the book.

The Vivere Sani Social Club is an extension of the cookbook, with the new friendships resulting in the desire to meet regularly for non-food time.

Membership has declined over the years, but “we’re still going,” says Mosna.

There are still a few copies of the Healthy Living Traditional Italian Recipes cookbook available. They can be picked up when the Vivere Sani Social Club meets, Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. at the Venetian Club, 269 John St. North.