Hamilton prepares to light up Veteran’s Place in Gore Park

News May 05, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Days prior to the official opening of the much anticipated Veterans’ Place at Gore Park in downtown Hamilton, Danny Nguyen and his young son were admiring the centre piece of the project, the Memorial Wall, that pays homage to Canadian peacekeeping around the world.

“I’ve heard a lot about it,” said Nguyen, who is originally from Vietnam, during a sunny spring morning. “I like it. It’s really nice. It’s good for people to remember the stories of the wars that Canada was involved in other countries.”

It’s exactly what the designers of the $2-million project, which has taken a year to complete, have been waiting to hear.

“We started with the hypothetical grandfather and his granddaughter and asked what kind of things you’d want them to see and have a discussion about,” said Christopher Redford, heritage presentation coordinator.

The result is 18 panels identifying a variety of themes, such as ‘Freedom’, ‘Loyalty’, and ‘Courage’ with accompany photographs distilled from a variety of local and national archives. Two of the more striking panels contain black and white photos of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and a 1916 military parade in Gore Park.

“I think it’s the best image of the whole thing,” said Redford, referring to the parade photograph that looks opposite King Street. “The intricacy of the photograph that was used is absolutely spectacular.”

Redford said over 100 photos has been used on the panels, which provide a soft illumination at night, and have extremely hard glass to deter vandalism. There are also security cameras about the area.

“The strength (of the glass) is tremendous,” he said. “We are not particularly worried about it.”

In addition, benches that were installed in the park now have large maple leafs embedded to deter skateboarders.

“The design was just brilliant,” said Redford.

The large building with the military parade photo on it is where the electrical equipment is kept. Previously the equipment was located underground and hard to maintain.

Redford said the Memorial Wall is to provide context about the conflicts and peacekeeping missions Canada has been involved in since the time when those local names engraved on the cenotaph occurred and that the memorial faces. The cenotaph was taken apart and shifted so it is now more on an axis with the other panels in the park. During the relocation, conservationists discovered a time capsule inside. It was x-rayed and the contents placed into a new time capsule and returned to the cenotaph.

Redford said the idea for Veterans’ Place is to provide a place for people to gather during Remembrance Day. But also, he said, it was to create an environment so Gore Park can “have a life as a park so people can come here and get more than a static series of images. We wanted something more dynamic so people can come back to again and again.”

The concept, design and the photographs were all approved by a 15-member focus group consisting of current and former service men and women.

“We let the veterans come up with the concepts, the historians found the images, they presented it to them and worked it through to get the diversity going,” said Redford.

Heritage officials say Veterans’ Place is, as far as they can determine, is the first of its kind in Canada to honour the country’s military personnel. The panels were based upon an Australian memorial, but the technology has been upgraded for Veterans’ Place, says Le’Ann Seely, manager of landscape architectural services.

Added to the Veterans’ Place Opening Ceremony experience on May 8 will be the introduction of “smart spaces” created by the Hamilton Public Library. Small proximity beacons have been installed on the enclaves that will provide information as they pass by to a person’s electronic devise through a free app that can be downloaded. The Hamilton Public Library, with a grant from the Hamilton Future Fund, partnered with McMaster University to “bring to life” the stories of Hamilton veterans, says Laura Lukasik, manager of partnerships and outreach.

“It’s just so important that it be part of the Gore Park experience,” said Lukasik. “Using our beacons and collecting stories and by sharing information and images, it will add another layer to the experience.”

At 7:45 musical performances by the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and Argyll and Sutherland Highlands of Canada will take place, in preparation of the opening ceremony beginning at 8:15. At 9 p.m. the panels will be turned on providing a glow to the entire Gore Park area.

“We are inviting people to come out view the park and talk about it,” said Redford. “I hope they like it.”

Meanwhile, Phase 2 of the transformation of Gore Park is scheduled to begin in 2016 on the section between James and Hughson streets. The sidewalk and apron of the fountain structure will be redesigned with new benches, and there will be grading of the south section of King Street.

In 2018, said Seely, phase three is scheduled to begin with the relocation of the Sir. John A Macdonald statue across John Street to the east side from the west side. But she said the city has agreed to wait until the developers of the Connaught building have completed their work before moving forward with their own reconstruction of Gore Park.

The two phases still needs council approval, which is projected to cost about $1.8 million each.

“Council knows about the cost and every year they have approved it,” said Seely.

 

 

 

 

Hamilton prepares to light up Veteran’s Place in Gore Park

News May 05, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Days prior to the official opening of the much anticipated Veterans’ Place at Gore Park in downtown Hamilton, Danny Nguyen and his young son were admiring the centre piece of the project, the Memorial Wall, that pays homage to Canadian peacekeeping around the world.

“I’ve heard a lot about it,” said Nguyen, who is originally from Vietnam, during a sunny spring morning. “I like it. It’s really nice. It’s good for people to remember the stories of the wars that Canada was involved in other countries.”

It’s exactly what the designers of the $2-million project, which has taken a year to complete, have been waiting to hear.

“We started with the hypothetical grandfather and his granddaughter and asked what kind of things you’d want them to see and have a discussion about,” said Christopher Redford, heritage presentation coordinator.

The result is 18 panels identifying a variety of themes, such as ‘Freedom’, ‘Loyalty’, and ‘Courage’ with accompany photographs distilled from a variety of local and national archives. Two of the more striking panels contain black and white photos of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and a 1916 military parade in Gore Park.

“I think it’s the best image of the whole thing,” said Redford, referring to the parade photograph that looks opposite King Street. “The intricacy of the photograph that was used is absolutely spectacular.”

Redford said over 100 photos has been used on the panels, which provide a soft illumination at night, and have extremely hard glass to deter vandalism. There are also security cameras about the area.

“The strength (of the glass) is tremendous,” he said. “We are not particularly worried about it.”

In addition, benches that were installed in the park now have large maple leafs embedded to deter skateboarders.

“The design was just brilliant,” said Redford.

The large building with the military parade photo on it is where the electrical equipment is kept. Previously the equipment was located underground and hard to maintain.

Redford said the Memorial Wall is to provide context about the conflicts and peacekeeping missions Canada has been involved in since the time when those local names engraved on the cenotaph occurred and that the memorial faces. The cenotaph was taken apart and shifted so it is now more on an axis with the other panels in the park. During the relocation, conservationists discovered a time capsule inside. It was x-rayed and the contents placed into a new time capsule and returned to the cenotaph.

Redford said the idea for Veterans’ Place is to provide a place for people to gather during Remembrance Day. But also, he said, it was to create an environment so Gore Park can “have a life as a park so people can come here and get more than a static series of images. We wanted something more dynamic so people can come back to again and again.”

The concept, design and the photographs were all approved by a 15-member focus group consisting of current and former service men and women.

“We let the veterans come up with the concepts, the historians found the images, they presented it to them and worked it through to get the diversity going,” said Redford.

Heritage officials say Veterans’ Place is, as far as they can determine, is the first of its kind in Canada to honour the country’s military personnel. The panels were based upon an Australian memorial, but the technology has been upgraded for Veterans’ Place, says Le’Ann Seely, manager of landscape architectural services.

Added to the Veterans’ Place Opening Ceremony experience on May 8 will be the introduction of “smart spaces” created by the Hamilton Public Library. Small proximity beacons have been installed on the enclaves that will provide information as they pass by to a person’s electronic devise through a free app that can be downloaded. The Hamilton Public Library, with a grant from the Hamilton Future Fund, partnered with McMaster University to “bring to life” the stories of Hamilton veterans, says Laura Lukasik, manager of partnerships and outreach.

“It’s just so important that it be part of the Gore Park experience,” said Lukasik. “Using our beacons and collecting stories and by sharing information and images, it will add another layer to the experience.”

At 7:45 musical performances by the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and Argyll and Sutherland Highlands of Canada will take place, in preparation of the opening ceremony beginning at 8:15. At 9 p.m. the panels will be turned on providing a glow to the entire Gore Park area.

“We are inviting people to come out view the park and talk about it,” said Redford. “I hope they like it.”

Meanwhile, Phase 2 of the transformation of Gore Park is scheduled to begin in 2016 on the section between James and Hughson streets. The sidewalk and apron of the fountain structure will be redesigned with new benches, and there will be grading of the south section of King Street.

In 2018, said Seely, phase three is scheduled to begin with the relocation of the Sir. John A Macdonald statue across John Street to the east side from the west side. But she said the city has agreed to wait until the developers of the Connaught building have completed their work before moving forward with their own reconstruction of Gore Park.

The two phases still needs council approval, which is projected to cost about $1.8 million each.

“Council knows about the cost and every year they have approved it,” said Seely.

 

 

 

 

Hamilton prepares to light up Veteran’s Place in Gore Park

News May 05, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Days prior to the official opening of the much anticipated Veterans’ Place at Gore Park in downtown Hamilton, Danny Nguyen and his young son were admiring the centre piece of the project, the Memorial Wall, that pays homage to Canadian peacekeeping around the world.

“I’ve heard a lot about it,” said Nguyen, who is originally from Vietnam, during a sunny spring morning. “I like it. It’s really nice. It’s good for people to remember the stories of the wars that Canada was involved in other countries.”

It’s exactly what the designers of the $2-million project, which has taken a year to complete, have been waiting to hear.

“We started with the hypothetical grandfather and his granddaughter and asked what kind of things you’d want them to see and have a discussion about,” said Christopher Redford, heritage presentation coordinator.

The result is 18 panels identifying a variety of themes, such as ‘Freedom’, ‘Loyalty’, and ‘Courage’ with accompany photographs distilled from a variety of local and national archives. Two of the more striking panels contain black and white photos of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and a 1916 military parade in Gore Park.

“I think it’s the best image of the whole thing,” said Redford, referring to the parade photograph that looks opposite King Street. “The intricacy of the photograph that was used is absolutely spectacular.”

Redford said over 100 photos has been used on the panels, which provide a soft illumination at night, and have extremely hard glass to deter vandalism. There are also security cameras about the area.

“The strength (of the glass) is tremendous,” he said. “We are not particularly worried about it.”

In addition, benches that were installed in the park now have large maple leafs embedded to deter skateboarders.

“The design was just brilliant,” said Redford.

The large building with the military parade photo on it is where the electrical equipment is kept. Previously the equipment was located underground and hard to maintain.

Redford said the Memorial Wall is to provide context about the conflicts and peacekeeping missions Canada has been involved in since the time when those local names engraved on the cenotaph occurred and that the memorial faces. The cenotaph was taken apart and shifted so it is now more on an axis with the other panels in the park. During the relocation, conservationists discovered a time capsule inside. It was x-rayed and the contents placed into a new time capsule and returned to the cenotaph.

Redford said the idea for Veterans’ Place is to provide a place for people to gather during Remembrance Day. But also, he said, it was to create an environment so Gore Park can “have a life as a park so people can come here and get more than a static series of images. We wanted something more dynamic so people can come back to again and again.”

The concept, design and the photographs were all approved by a 15-member focus group consisting of current and former service men and women.

“We let the veterans come up with the concepts, the historians found the images, they presented it to them and worked it through to get the diversity going,” said Redford.

Heritage officials say Veterans’ Place is, as far as they can determine, is the first of its kind in Canada to honour the country’s military personnel. The panels were based upon an Australian memorial, but the technology has been upgraded for Veterans’ Place, says Le’Ann Seely, manager of landscape architectural services.

Added to the Veterans’ Place Opening Ceremony experience on May 8 will be the introduction of “smart spaces” created by the Hamilton Public Library. Small proximity beacons have been installed on the enclaves that will provide information as they pass by to a person’s electronic devise through a free app that can be downloaded. The Hamilton Public Library, with a grant from the Hamilton Future Fund, partnered with McMaster University to “bring to life” the stories of Hamilton veterans, says Laura Lukasik, manager of partnerships and outreach.

“It’s just so important that it be part of the Gore Park experience,” said Lukasik. “Using our beacons and collecting stories and by sharing information and images, it will add another layer to the experience.”

At 7:45 musical performances by the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and Argyll and Sutherland Highlands of Canada will take place, in preparation of the opening ceremony beginning at 8:15. At 9 p.m. the panels will be turned on providing a glow to the entire Gore Park area.

“We are inviting people to come out view the park and talk about it,” said Redford. “I hope they like it.”

Meanwhile, Phase 2 of the transformation of Gore Park is scheduled to begin in 2016 on the section between James and Hughson streets. The sidewalk and apron of the fountain structure will be redesigned with new benches, and there will be grading of the south section of King Street.

In 2018, said Seely, phase three is scheduled to begin with the relocation of the Sir. John A Macdonald statue across John Street to the east side from the west side. But she said the city has agreed to wait until the developers of the Connaught building have completed their work before moving forward with their own reconstruction of Gore Park.

The two phases still needs council approval, which is projected to cost about $1.8 million each.

“Council knows about the cost and every year they have approved it,” said Seely.