Emerald Ash Borer continues to destroy Hamilton’s ash trees

News May 04, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton forestry staff is expected to replace the thousands of ash trees the city is cutting down this year with an equal number of indigenous trees.

Steve Barnhart, manager of forestry, told members of the public works committee May 4, city staff is projected to cut down about 2,300 ash trees this year on residential streets, parks and cemeteries. Staff will be replanting about 3,777 trees based on a 1:1 ratio re-planting goal this year, said Barnhart. Those trees will include Ornamental Pear, Ginkgo, Eastern Redbud, tulip tree, the Kentucky Coffee and the Autumn Maple.

Since the city’s 10-year, $26.2 million Emerald Ash Borer program began in 2012, the city has removed 6,761 ash trees, but only replanted 1,946 trees. Forestry staff, said Barnhart, is also behind on its stump removing, digging out only 3,747.

City officials project the Asian beetle, first identified in Hamilton in 2009, will wipe out the ash tree population within four years. The invasive species was first spotted in Windsor in 2002, and it has since systematically marched up Ontario and Quebec decimating ash trees.

The city has about 23,000 ash trees on streets, parks and cemeteries.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead said one mountain resident managed to take some ash wood from a downed tree. Whitehead said the resident didn’t know he couldn’t take the wood to a cottage or some other vacation area due to a provincial restriction. 

Barnhart said the city will improve its education program on the city’s ash borer program, including identifying limits on relocating ash wood. The information can be found on the city’s website www.hamilton.ca.

City staff says they will remove an ash tree from public property, but homeowners are responsible for their own ash trees.

Maria Pearson, Stoney Creek councillor for Ward 10 which has the highest concentration of ash trees, said a 70’ ash tree on private land cost a resident about $1,000 to remove.

“I can understand residents’ concerns,” she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson praised city staff for doing “the best to their ability” in addressing the ash tree problem. But he pointed out that homeowners “are just bewildered about what’s happening” to their ash trees.

Councillors also encouraged forestry staff to talk with school boards about removing ash trees from their properties. Pearson says one school property in Stoney Creek she saw had at least three dead ash trees that needed to be removed.

 

Emerald Ash Borer continues to destroy Hamilton’s ash trees

News May 04, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton forestry staff is expected to replace the thousands of ash trees the city is cutting down this year with an equal number of indigenous trees.

Steve Barnhart, manager of forestry, told members of the public works committee May 4, city staff is projected to cut down about 2,300 ash trees this year on residential streets, parks and cemeteries. Staff will be replanting about 3,777 trees based on a 1:1 ratio re-planting goal this year, said Barnhart. Those trees will include Ornamental Pear, Ginkgo, Eastern Redbud, tulip tree, the Kentucky Coffee and the Autumn Maple.

Since the city’s 10-year, $26.2 million Emerald Ash Borer program began in 2012, the city has removed 6,761 ash trees, but only replanted 1,946 trees. Forestry staff, said Barnhart, is also behind on its stump removing, digging out only 3,747.

City officials project the Asian beetle, first identified in Hamilton in 2009, will wipe out the ash tree population within four years. The invasive species was first spotted in Windsor in 2002, and it has since systematically marched up Ontario and Quebec decimating ash trees.

The city has about 23,000 ash trees on streets, parks and cemeteries.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead said one mountain resident managed to take some ash wood from a downed tree. Whitehead said the resident didn’t know he couldn’t take the wood to a cottage or some other vacation area due to a provincial restriction. 

Barnhart said the city will improve its education program on the city’s ash borer program, including identifying limits on relocating ash wood. The information can be found on the city’s website www.hamilton.ca.

City staff says they will remove an ash tree from public property, but homeowners are responsible for their own ash trees.

Maria Pearson, Stoney Creek councillor for Ward 10 which has the highest concentration of ash trees, said a 70’ ash tree on private land cost a resident about $1,000 to remove.

“I can understand residents’ concerns,” she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson praised city staff for doing “the best to their ability” in addressing the ash tree problem. But he pointed out that homeowners “are just bewildered about what’s happening” to their ash trees.

Councillors also encouraged forestry staff to talk with school boards about removing ash trees from their properties. Pearson says one school property in Stoney Creek she saw had at least three dead ash trees that needed to be removed.

 

Emerald Ash Borer continues to destroy Hamilton’s ash trees

News May 04, 2015 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton forestry staff is expected to replace the thousands of ash trees the city is cutting down this year with an equal number of indigenous trees.

Steve Barnhart, manager of forestry, told members of the public works committee May 4, city staff is projected to cut down about 2,300 ash trees this year on residential streets, parks and cemeteries. Staff will be replanting about 3,777 trees based on a 1:1 ratio re-planting goal this year, said Barnhart. Those trees will include Ornamental Pear, Ginkgo, Eastern Redbud, tulip tree, the Kentucky Coffee and the Autumn Maple.

Since the city’s 10-year, $26.2 million Emerald Ash Borer program began in 2012, the city has removed 6,761 ash trees, but only replanted 1,946 trees. Forestry staff, said Barnhart, is also behind on its stump removing, digging out only 3,747.

City officials project the Asian beetle, first identified in Hamilton in 2009, will wipe out the ash tree population within four years. The invasive species was first spotted in Windsor in 2002, and it has since systematically marched up Ontario and Quebec decimating ash trees.

The city has about 23,000 ash trees on streets, parks and cemeteries.

Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead said one mountain resident managed to take some ash wood from a downed tree. Whitehead said the resident didn’t know he couldn’t take the wood to a cottage or some other vacation area due to a provincial restriction. 

Barnhart said the city will improve its education program on the city’s ash borer program, including identifying limits on relocating ash wood. The information can be found on the city’s website www.hamilton.ca.

City staff says they will remove an ash tree from public property, but homeowners are responsible for their own ash trees.

Maria Pearson, Stoney Creek councillor for Ward 10 which has the highest concentration of ash trees, said a 70’ ash tree on private land cost a resident about $1,000 to remove.

“I can understand residents’ concerns,” she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson praised city staff for doing “the best to their ability” in addressing the ash tree problem. But he pointed out that homeowners “are just bewildered about what’s happening” to their ash trees.

Councillors also encouraged forestry staff to talk with school boards about removing ash trees from their properties. Pearson says one school property in Stoney Creek she saw had at least three dead ash trees that needed to be removed.