Educational Archives and Heritage Centre of the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board opens its doors this weekend

News Apr 27, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Artifacts salvaged from the attics, hallways and walls of old public schools will be on display this weekend.

Some of it will even be for sale.

The Educational Archives and Heritage Centre of the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board is inviting the public to see the education artifacts it has saved from the trash heap as part of Doors Open.

School crests, election signs, student and donated artwork from closed schools, building gargoyles, clocks, desks, bells and much more.

The doors will be open at the 155 Macassa Ave. museum (formerly Vincent Massey school) from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

“We are unique,” says manager John Aikman. “We are also the largest in Canada.”

The archives opened in 1988. Before a school closes, Aikman and his team inventory all the artifacts and add them to a database. When the school closes its doors for the last time, they go out to get the items.

While many items from days gone by were lost prior to its opening, there are artifacts dating back more than 200 years.

There are  about 16,000 textbooks, including old favourites like ”Practical and Artistic Basketry.” The oldest textbooks date back to the 1700s.

There are hundreds of yearbooks, including an 1890 one from Hamilton Central Collegiate Institute.

There are also “about a million” photographs at the archive, all catalogued for easy retrieval.

The yearbooks are one of the most popular items, with many visitors spending hours perusing.

The archive does not have every yearbook ever published by a Hamilton public school, but if there are extras, they can be purchased, said Aikman.

“These are all donations, or when a school closes we get them,” he said.

This weekend, letters that were once part of signs on exterior walls will also be sold.

Only the letters that comprise the formal name of a school are kept, says Aikman. Most adorn the walls in the hallways at the archives, keeping the names alive and showing the different styles used throughout the years.

But words like elementary, secondary and school aren’t needed. That means there are about 100 extra letters — including many O’s and S’s — available for sale. They will cost $20 apiece (two for $35 or three for $55; cash or cheque only).

Educational Archives and Heritage Centre of the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board opens its doors this weekend

Artifacts salvaged from the attics, hallways and walls of old public schools will be on display

News Apr 27, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Artifacts salvaged from the attics, hallways and walls of old public schools will be on display this weekend.

Some of it will even be for sale.

The Educational Archives and Heritage Centre of the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board is inviting the public to see the education artifacts it has saved from the trash heap as part of Doors Open.

School crests, election signs, student and donated artwork from closed schools, building gargoyles, clocks, desks, bells and much more.

We are unique. We are also the largest in Canada.

The doors will be open at the 155 Macassa Ave. museum (formerly Vincent Massey school) from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

“We are unique,” says manager John Aikman. “We are also the largest in Canada.”

The archives opened in 1988. Before a school closes, Aikman and his team inventory all the artifacts and add them to a database. When the school closes its doors for the last time, they go out to get the items.

While many items from days gone by were lost prior to its opening, there are artifacts dating back more than 200 years.

There are  about 16,000 textbooks, including old favourites like ”Practical and Artistic Basketry.” The oldest textbooks date back to the 1700s.

There are hundreds of yearbooks, including an 1890 one from Hamilton Central Collegiate Institute.

There are also “about a million” photographs at the archive, all catalogued for easy retrieval.

The yearbooks are one of the most popular items, with many visitors spending hours perusing.

The archive does not have every yearbook ever published by a Hamilton public school, but if there are extras, they can be purchased, said Aikman.

“These are all donations, or when a school closes we get them,” he said.

This weekend, letters that were once part of signs on exterior walls will also be sold.

Only the letters that comprise the formal name of a school are kept, says Aikman. Most adorn the walls in the hallways at the archives, keeping the names alive and showing the different styles used throughout the years.

But words like elementary, secondary and school aren’t needed. That means there are about 100 extra letters — including many O’s and S’s — available for sale. They will cost $20 apiece (two for $35 or three for $55; cash or cheque only).

Educational Archives and Heritage Centre of the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board opens its doors this weekend

Artifacts salvaged from the attics, hallways and walls of old public schools will be on display

News Apr 27, 2015 by Gord Bowes Hamilton Mountain News

Artifacts salvaged from the attics, hallways and walls of old public schools will be on display this weekend.

Some of it will even be for sale.

The Educational Archives and Heritage Centre of the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board is inviting the public to see the education artifacts it has saved from the trash heap as part of Doors Open.

School crests, election signs, student and donated artwork from closed schools, building gargoyles, clocks, desks, bells and much more.

We are unique. We are also the largest in Canada.

The doors will be open at the 155 Macassa Ave. museum (formerly Vincent Massey school) from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

“We are unique,” says manager John Aikman. “We are also the largest in Canada.”

The archives opened in 1988. Before a school closes, Aikman and his team inventory all the artifacts and add them to a database. When the school closes its doors for the last time, they go out to get the items.

While many items from days gone by were lost prior to its opening, there are artifacts dating back more than 200 years.

There are  about 16,000 textbooks, including old favourites like ”Practical and Artistic Basketry.” The oldest textbooks date back to the 1700s.

There are hundreds of yearbooks, including an 1890 one from Hamilton Central Collegiate Institute.

There are also “about a million” photographs at the archive, all catalogued for easy retrieval.

The yearbooks are one of the most popular items, with many visitors spending hours perusing.

The archive does not have every yearbook ever published by a Hamilton public school, but if there are extras, they can be purchased, said Aikman.

“These are all donations, or when a school closes we get them,” he said.

This weekend, letters that were once part of signs on exterior walls will also be sold.

Only the letters that comprise the formal name of a school are kept, says Aikman. Most adorn the walls in the hallways at the archives, keeping the names alive and showing the different styles used throughout the years.

But words like elementary, secondary and school aren’t needed. That means there are about 100 extra letters — including many O’s and S’s — available for sale. They will cost $20 apiece (two for $35 or three for $55; cash or cheque only).