Conservatives’ budget receives some applause from the NDP

News Apr 22, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

The federal Conservatives 2015 budget has a few admirers from the opposition.

Hamilton East-Stoney Creek NDP MP Wayne Marston says  the Conservatives managed to take at least three ideas from the NDP’s election package and incorporate them into this year’s budget that will post a $1.4 bill surplus in 2015-16.

Small businesses will benefit with a tax cut from 11 per cent to 9 per cent by 2019, while manufacturers will continue to write off a portion of the cost of modernizing machinery and equipment, proposals that the NDP championed, said Marston.

 In addition, the Conservatives are using the gas tax money to provide municipalities with needed transit funding starting in 2017-19 with $250 million, which will grow to $1 billion in 2019-20.

“These (items) are directly from our election platform,” said Marston. “This is the first time this government has listened to us.”

He said small businesses are a “major creator” of jobs, while the accelerated capital gains relief should be there “so businesses can properly plan ahead.”

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale Conservative MP David Sweet says targeting tax cuts for businesses and manufacturers, while funding research and development  is what the government has been doing for years.

“We are the party of tax cuts,” says Sweet.

The Conservatives have also raised the  tax-free savings account limit that people can save each year  from $6,000 to $10,000. And they have introduced the Universal Child Care Benefit that will cost the treasury about $4.5 billion.

“These Family Tax cuts will provide needed relief to families,” he said.

Marston says contrary to popular belief an NDP government won’t eliminate those tax benefits, but will be instead scrapping the income-splitting program that he says benefits only the top 15 per cent of Canadians.

“We are not taking (the child benefit) away,” said Marston. “It’s the income-splitting which is outrageous. It’s taking $2.5 billion out of the economy. They are benefiting their rich friends. It should go to social housing.”

The transit funding could be particularly beneficial to Hamilton and other municipalities, says Sweet. The program is linked to the Conservatives ongoing $53-billion Canada Build project  already offered to municipalities and the provinces. Sweet says he has already had discussions with Hamilton officials about funding for potential projects.

“This is a new era of relations,” said Sweet. “The discussions I’ve had (with city officials) were to make sure we are on the same page.”

Also part of the budget is $35 million to help new immigrants upgrade their foreign credentials and a plan to reduce the remittances sent by immigrants back home.

“We began (helping newcomers) years ago so they can pursue their skills in Canada,” said Marston.

Marston says while the NDP can applaud portions of the budget, the reality is it’s a financial document crafted for the federal election this fall.

“It’s targeting their base,” said Marston. “There’s something for seniors, and veterans. It’s very cynical what they are doing.”

Missing from the budget though, says Marston, is needed infrastructure funding for the provinces, help for the missing and murdered Aboriginal women and children, and the total ignoring of the issues in northern Ontario and the Ring of Fire.

“I would have liked to have seen more money for non-profit housing, something Hamilton’s activists have been asking for,” said Marston.

Sweet says the government will be extending compassionate care leave from six weeks to six months for Canadians carrying for seriously ill family members, and they are introducing a Home Accessibility Tax Credit of up to $1,500 for the cost of renovating a residence for seniors.

Liberal party leader Justin Trudeau says the budget devotes most of its help to Canadians “who need it the least.” Despite stagnating incomes, and deficits during the Conservatives’ reign, “Mr. Harper finds ways to give billions to the rich.”

Not forgotten is nearly $440-millionover five years the budget allocated to counter-terrorism efforts for the RCMP, the Canadian Border Security, and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. In addition, $2 million in extra money will go towards the Security Intelligence Review Committee to enhance its oversight of CSIS’s expanded powers once Bill C-51 is passed.

“The (security funding) is in response to the critics of Bill C-51 (for proper oversight),” said Sweet.

Canada’s military budget saw a bump of $1.1 billion over three years starting in 2017-18. About $360 million will fund Canada’s deployment in Iraq, and $7.1 million to train Ukrainian security forces. Canada’s defense spending in 2014-15 was $20 billion.

Marston points out since Bill C-51 was released earlier this year, it’s popularity among Canadians has plummeted from 80 per cent to about 30 per cent. Even though the bill has not been passed, the Conservatives, he says, are “trying to low ball” the debate and keep it out of the public eye.

The 2015 budget will see the government climb out of a deficit and post a $1.4 bill surplus in 2015-16. But the Conservatives are draining their $3 billion contingency fund to do it, reducing it by $2 billion. The 2015 budget also assumes oil prices will rise eventually to $75 a barrel by 2017.

“I’m confident in the plan that our finance minister has put in place will be successful,” said Sweet. “We made a promise of a balanced budget. So it’s good news to the next generation of Canadians.

Conservatives’ budget receives some applause from the NDP

News Apr 22, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

The federal Conservatives 2015 budget has a few admirers from the opposition.

Hamilton East-Stoney Creek NDP MP Wayne Marston says  the Conservatives managed to take at least three ideas from the NDP’s election package and incorporate them into this year’s budget that will post a $1.4 bill surplus in 2015-16.

Small businesses will benefit with a tax cut from 11 per cent to 9 per cent by 2019, while manufacturers will continue to write off a portion of the cost of modernizing machinery and equipment, proposals that the NDP championed, said Marston.

 In addition, the Conservatives are using the gas tax money to provide municipalities with needed transit funding starting in 2017-19 with $250 million, which will grow to $1 billion in 2019-20.

“These (items) are directly from our election platform,” said Marston. “This is the first time this government has listened to us.”

He said small businesses are a “major creator” of jobs, while the accelerated capital gains relief should be there “so businesses can properly plan ahead.”

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale Conservative MP David Sweet says targeting tax cuts for businesses and manufacturers, while funding research and development  is what the government has been doing for years.

“We are the party of tax cuts,” says Sweet.

The Conservatives have also raised the  tax-free savings account limit that people can save each year  from $6,000 to $10,000. And they have introduced the Universal Child Care Benefit that will cost the treasury about $4.5 billion.

“These Family Tax cuts will provide needed relief to families,” he said.

Marston says contrary to popular belief an NDP government won’t eliminate those tax benefits, but will be instead scrapping the income-splitting program that he says benefits only the top 15 per cent of Canadians.

“We are not taking (the child benefit) away,” said Marston. “It’s the income-splitting which is outrageous. It’s taking $2.5 billion out of the economy. They are benefiting their rich friends. It should go to social housing.”

The transit funding could be particularly beneficial to Hamilton and other municipalities, says Sweet. The program is linked to the Conservatives ongoing $53-billion Canada Build project  already offered to municipalities and the provinces. Sweet says he has already had discussions with Hamilton officials about funding for potential projects.

“This is a new era of relations,” said Sweet. “The discussions I’ve had (with city officials) were to make sure we are on the same page.”

Also part of the budget is $35 million to help new immigrants upgrade their foreign credentials and a plan to reduce the remittances sent by immigrants back home.

“We began (helping newcomers) years ago so they can pursue their skills in Canada,” said Marston.

Marston says while the NDP can applaud portions of the budget, the reality is it’s a financial document crafted for the federal election this fall.

“It’s targeting their base,” said Marston. “There’s something for seniors, and veterans. It’s very cynical what they are doing.”

Missing from the budget though, says Marston, is needed infrastructure funding for the provinces, help for the missing and murdered Aboriginal women and children, and the total ignoring of the issues in northern Ontario and the Ring of Fire.

“I would have liked to have seen more money for non-profit housing, something Hamilton’s activists have been asking for,” said Marston.

Sweet says the government will be extending compassionate care leave from six weeks to six months for Canadians carrying for seriously ill family members, and they are introducing a Home Accessibility Tax Credit of up to $1,500 for the cost of renovating a residence for seniors.

Liberal party leader Justin Trudeau says the budget devotes most of its help to Canadians “who need it the least.” Despite stagnating incomes, and deficits during the Conservatives’ reign, “Mr. Harper finds ways to give billions to the rich.”

Not forgotten is nearly $440-millionover five years the budget allocated to counter-terrorism efforts for the RCMP, the Canadian Border Security, and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. In addition, $2 million in extra money will go towards the Security Intelligence Review Committee to enhance its oversight of CSIS’s expanded powers once Bill C-51 is passed.

“The (security funding) is in response to the critics of Bill C-51 (for proper oversight),” said Sweet.

Canada’s military budget saw a bump of $1.1 billion over three years starting in 2017-18. About $360 million will fund Canada’s deployment in Iraq, and $7.1 million to train Ukrainian security forces. Canada’s defense spending in 2014-15 was $20 billion.

Marston points out since Bill C-51 was released earlier this year, it’s popularity among Canadians has plummeted from 80 per cent to about 30 per cent. Even though the bill has not been passed, the Conservatives, he says, are “trying to low ball” the debate and keep it out of the public eye.

The 2015 budget will see the government climb out of a deficit and post a $1.4 bill surplus in 2015-16. But the Conservatives are draining their $3 billion contingency fund to do it, reducing it by $2 billion. The 2015 budget also assumes oil prices will rise eventually to $75 a barrel by 2017.

“I’m confident in the plan that our finance minister has put in place will be successful,” said Sweet. “We made a promise of a balanced budget. So it’s good news to the next generation of Canadians.

Conservatives’ budget receives some applause from the NDP

News Apr 22, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

The federal Conservatives 2015 budget has a few admirers from the opposition.

Hamilton East-Stoney Creek NDP MP Wayne Marston says  the Conservatives managed to take at least three ideas from the NDP’s election package and incorporate them into this year’s budget that will post a $1.4 bill surplus in 2015-16.

Small businesses will benefit with a tax cut from 11 per cent to 9 per cent by 2019, while manufacturers will continue to write off a portion of the cost of modernizing machinery and equipment, proposals that the NDP championed, said Marston.

 In addition, the Conservatives are using the gas tax money to provide municipalities with needed transit funding starting in 2017-19 with $250 million, which will grow to $1 billion in 2019-20.

“These (items) are directly from our election platform,” said Marston. “This is the first time this government has listened to us.”

He said small businesses are a “major creator” of jobs, while the accelerated capital gains relief should be there “so businesses can properly plan ahead.”

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale Conservative MP David Sweet says targeting tax cuts for businesses and manufacturers, while funding research and development  is what the government has been doing for years.

“We are the party of tax cuts,” says Sweet.

The Conservatives have also raised the  tax-free savings account limit that people can save each year  from $6,000 to $10,000. And they have introduced the Universal Child Care Benefit that will cost the treasury about $4.5 billion.

“These Family Tax cuts will provide needed relief to families,” he said.

Marston says contrary to popular belief an NDP government won’t eliminate those tax benefits, but will be instead scrapping the income-splitting program that he says benefits only the top 15 per cent of Canadians.

“We are not taking (the child benefit) away,” said Marston. “It’s the income-splitting which is outrageous. It’s taking $2.5 billion out of the economy. They are benefiting their rich friends. It should go to social housing.”

The transit funding could be particularly beneficial to Hamilton and other municipalities, says Sweet. The program is linked to the Conservatives ongoing $53-billion Canada Build project  already offered to municipalities and the provinces. Sweet says he has already had discussions with Hamilton officials about funding for potential projects.

“This is a new era of relations,” said Sweet. “The discussions I’ve had (with city officials) were to make sure we are on the same page.”

Also part of the budget is $35 million to help new immigrants upgrade their foreign credentials and a plan to reduce the remittances sent by immigrants back home.

“We began (helping newcomers) years ago so they can pursue their skills in Canada,” said Marston.

Marston says while the NDP can applaud portions of the budget, the reality is it’s a financial document crafted for the federal election this fall.

“It’s targeting their base,” said Marston. “There’s something for seniors, and veterans. It’s very cynical what they are doing.”

Missing from the budget though, says Marston, is needed infrastructure funding for the provinces, help for the missing and murdered Aboriginal women and children, and the total ignoring of the issues in northern Ontario and the Ring of Fire.

“I would have liked to have seen more money for non-profit housing, something Hamilton’s activists have been asking for,” said Marston.

Sweet says the government will be extending compassionate care leave from six weeks to six months for Canadians carrying for seriously ill family members, and they are introducing a Home Accessibility Tax Credit of up to $1,500 for the cost of renovating a residence for seniors.

Liberal party leader Justin Trudeau says the budget devotes most of its help to Canadians “who need it the least.” Despite stagnating incomes, and deficits during the Conservatives’ reign, “Mr. Harper finds ways to give billions to the rich.”

Not forgotten is nearly $440-millionover five years the budget allocated to counter-terrorism efforts for the RCMP, the Canadian Border Security, and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. In addition, $2 million in extra money will go towards the Security Intelligence Review Committee to enhance its oversight of CSIS’s expanded powers once Bill C-51 is passed.

“The (security funding) is in response to the critics of Bill C-51 (for proper oversight),” said Sweet.

Canada’s military budget saw a bump of $1.1 billion over three years starting in 2017-18. About $360 million will fund Canada’s deployment in Iraq, and $7.1 million to train Ukrainian security forces. Canada’s defense spending in 2014-15 was $20 billion.

Marston points out since Bill C-51 was released earlier this year, it’s popularity among Canadians has plummeted from 80 per cent to about 30 per cent. Even though the bill has not been passed, the Conservatives, he says, are “trying to low ball” the debate and keep it out of the public eye.

The 2015 budget will see the government climb out of a deficit and post a $1.4 bill surplus in 2015-16. But the Conservatives are draining their $3 billion contingency fund to do it, reducing it by $2 billion. The 2015 budget also assumes oil prices will rise eventually to $75 a barrel by 2017.

“I’m confident in the plan that our finance minister has put in place will be successful,” said Sweet. “We made a promise of a balanced budget. So it’s good news to the next generation of Canadians.