Hamilton school trustees back Charter right to healthy environment

News Apr 22, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton public school board trustees have joined city councillors in endorsing a national push to enshrine the right to a healthy environment in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Trustees voted unanimously on Monday to support the six principles of the Blue Dot Movement, an initiative launched by renowned Canadian environmentalist David Suzuki last fall.

They include rights to breathe clean air, drink clean water, eat safe food, access nature, know about pollutants released into the local environment and participate in decision-making that will affect the environment.

“I think this will be a very nice compliment to what we’re already doing at the board level and may help inform some of our future direction,” central Mountain trustee Dawn Danko said.

“I do believe as guardians of children in our school system we do need to foster that respect and the care of the environment.”

Dundas resident Grant Linney, a member of Hamilton Blue Dot, said the board joins more than 30 jurisdictions in Canada – including the City of Hamilton in February – to endorse the principles.

He told trustees the movement takes its name from the how the Earth would appear to aliens, a planet dominated by blue, white, green and brown, rather than the countries normally highlighted by traditional atlas globes.

“This is our blue dot,” Linney said. “This is the world that at our own great peril that we have somehow lost touch with.”

Hamilton school trustees back Charter right to healthy environment

News Apr 22, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton public school board trustees have joined city councillors in endorsing a national push to enshrine the right to a healthy environment in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Trustees voted unanimously on Monday to support the six principles of the Blue Dot Movement, an initiative launched by renowned Canadian environmentalist David Suzuki last fall.

They include rights to breathe clean air, drink clean water, eat safe food, access nature, know about pollutants released into the local environment and participate in decision-making that will affect the environment.

“I think this will be a very nice compliment to what we’re already doing at the board level and may help inform some of our future direction,” central Mountain trustee Dawn Danko said.

“I do believe as guardians of children in our school system we do need to foster that respect and the care of the environment.”

“I do believe as guardians of children in our school system we do need to foster that respect and the care of the environment.”

Dundas resident Grant Linney, a member of Hamilton Blue Dot, said the board joins more than 30 jurisdictions in Canada – including the City of Hamilton in February – to endorse the principles.

He told trustees the movement takes its name from the how the Earth would appear to aliens, a planet dominated by blue, white, green and brown, rather than the countries normally highlighted by traditional atlas globes.

“This is our blue dot,” Linney said. “This is the world that at our own great peril that we have somehow lost touch with.”

Hamilton school trustees back Charter right to healthy environment

News Apr 22, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton public school board trustees have joined city councillors in endorsing a national push to enshrine the right to a healthy environment in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Trustees voted unanimously on Monday to support the six principles of the Blue Dot Movement, an initiative launched by renowned Canadian environmentalist David Suzuki last fall.

They include rights to breathe clean air, drink clean water, eat safe food, access nature, know about pollutants released into the local environment and participate in decision-making that will affect the environment.

“I think this will be a very nice compliment to what we’re already doing at the board level and may help inform some of our future direction,” central Mountain trustee Dawn Danko said.

“I do believe as guardians of children in our school system we do need to foster that respect and the care of the environment.”

“I do believe as guardians of children in our school system we do need to foster that respect and the care of the environment.”

Dundas resident Grant Linney, a member of Hamilton Blue Dot, said the board joins more than 30 jurisdictions in Canada – including the City of Hamilton in February – to endorse the principles.

He told trustees the movement takes its name from the how the Earth would appear to aliens, a planet dominated by blue, white, green and brown, rather than the countries normally highlighted by traditional atlas globes.

“This is our blue dot,” Linney said. “This is the world that at our own great peril that we have somehow lost touch with.”