Hamilton remembers the Armenian genocide of 1915

News Apr 22, 2015 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Armenians around the world are marking a solemn occasion this month as they commemorate what’s considered by many as the first genocide of the 20th Century.

This year marks the centennial of the 1915 Armenian genocide, which saw an ancient civilization displaced from its homeland of 2,500 years.

The Armenian genocide was formally commemorated in Hamilton this week with a special requiem service on Sunday at St. Mary Armenian Church in Hamilton and a dedication ceremony at the Armenian Community Centre in Stoney Creek.

About 150 people gathered for an eternal flame ceremony and an afternoon program at the community centre, which included a screening of the documentary film, Daylight after a Century, and a keynote speech by Nora Arouchian from the Armenian National Committee. Later this year, a monument will be installed at the Stoney Creek site to commemorate the genocide.

Dignitaries included politicians from all three levels of government.

According to the International Association of Genocide Scholars, under the cover of the First World War, the government of the Ottoman Empire, in present-day Turkey, began a systematic genocide of Armenian citizens - an unarmed Christian minority population. More than one million Armenians were exterminated through direct killing, starvation, torture and forced death marches. The rest of the Armenian population fled into permanent exile.

Today the Turkish government continues to deny the existence of an Armenian genocide.

Despite stances held by countries like France and Switzerland, where it’s a crime to deny the Armenian genocide, in Turkey, it’s a crime to affirm it.

In 2005, the Turkish government enacted Article 301 of the Turkish penal code, which makes it illegal for any citizen or resident to give credence to the Armenian genocide.

On April 21, 2004, the Armenian genocide was officially recognized by Canada’s federal government.

Hamilton remembers the Armenian genocide of 1915

News Apr 22, 2015 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Armenians around the world are marking a solemn occasion this month as they commemorate what’s considered by many as the first genocide of the 20th Century.

This year marks the centennial of the 1915 Armenian genocide, which saw an ancient civilization displaced from its homeland of 2,500 years.

The Armenian genocide was formally commemorated in Hamilton this week with a special requiem service on Sunday at St. Mary Armenian Church in Hamilton and a dedication ceremony at the Armenian Community Centre in Stoney Creek.

About 150 people gathered for an eternal flame ceremony and an afternoon program at the community centre, which included a screening of the documentary film, Daylight after a Century, and a keynote speech by Nora Arouchian from the Armenian National Committee. Later this year, a monument will be installed at the Stoney Creek site to commemorate the genocide.

Dignitaries included politicians from all three levels of government.

According to the International Association of Genocide Scholars, under the cover of the First World War, the government of the Ottoman Empire, in present-day Turkey, began a systematic genocide of Armenian citizens - an unarmed Christian minority population. More than one million Armenians were exterminated through direct killing, starvation, torture and forced death marches. The rest of the Armenian population fled into permanent exile.

Today the Turkish government continues to deny the existence of an Armenian genocide.

Despite stances held by countries like France and Switzerland, where it’s a crime to deny the Armenian genocide, in Turkey, it’s a crime to affirm it.

In 2005, the Turkish government enacted Article 301 of the Turkish penal code, which makes it illegal for any citizen or resident to give credence to the Armenian genocide.

On April 21, 2004, the Armenian genocide was officially recognized by Canada’s federal government.

Hamilton remembers the Armenian genocide of 1915

News Apr 22, 2015 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Armenians around the world are marking a solemn occasion this month as they commemorate what’s considered by many as the first genocide of the 20th Century.

This year marks the centennial of the 1915 Armenian genocide, which saw an ancient civilization displaced from its homeland of 2,500 years.

The Armenian genocide was formally commemorated in Hamilton this week with a special requiem service on Sunday at St. Mary Armenian Church in Hamilton and a dedication ceremony at the Armenian Community Centre in Stoney Creek.

About 150 people gathered for an eternal flame ceremony and an afternoon program at the community centre, which included a screening of the documentary film, Daylight after a Century, and a keynote speech by Nora Arouchian from the Armenian National Committee. Later this year, a monument will be installed at the Stoney Creek site to commemorate the genocide.

Dignitaries included politicians from all three levels of government.

According to the International Association of Genocide Scholars, under the cover of the First World War, the government of the Ottoman Empire, in present-day Turkey, began a systematic genocide of Armenian citizens - an unarmed Christian minority population. More than one million Armenians were exterminated through direct killing, starvation, torture and forced death marches. The rest of the Armenian population fled into permanent exile.

Today the Turkish government continues to deny the existence of an Armenian genocide.

Despite stances held by countries like France and Switzerland, where it’s a crime to deny the Armenian genocide, in Turkey, it’s a crime to affirm it.

In 2005, the Turkish government enacted Article 301 of the Turkish penal code, which makes it illegal for any citizen or resident to give credence to the Armenian genocide.

On April 21, 2004, the Armenian genocide was officially recognized by Canada’s federal government.