Hamilton reviews wood burning restrictions

News Apr 21, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

 A proposed bylaw to regulate wood burning within the city of Hamilton is still smoldering after a Hamilton doctor urged councillors to consider regulating the practice.

Dr. Ted Mitchell, a family physician, said burning wood by homeowners causes air respiratory problems, and is similar to second-hand smoke, which Hamilton has managed to regulate in various private businesses and public areas. He told members of the April 20 Board of Health committee one hour of wood burning emits the same amount of carcinogens as 6,000 cigarettes.

“People burn work for ambience, not to save money or for heat,” said Mitchell, who is working with Environment Hamilton in a campaign to restrict wood burning.

At the very least, Mitchell wanted the city’s public health department to review the health impacts of wood burning, particularly during warmer months. He also wanted the city to do something to restrict the fire pits that are allowed in the summer.

Lynda Lukasik, of Environment Hamilton, suggested Hamilton examines Halton Region’s response to the issue. She said the municipality has launched an education campaign to curtail wood burning by residents.

Halton Region emphasized in its education material that burning wood produces “greater air pollution” by contributing to higher levels of sulphur oxide, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide, particulate matter, and other dioxins.

Wood Smoke, says opponents, can cause headaches, sore throat, runny nose, nausea, fatigue and dizziness. It has also been linked to respiratory diseases and premature death.

Hamilton already bans burning in urban areas except for cooking purposes. Outdoor burning in rural areas is allowed but with a permit.

Members of the city’s Board of Health remained uninspired to rush into restricting wood burning.

Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson said most homeowners enjoy burning wood in their homes and are not going to give it up.

Stoney Creek councillor Maria Pearson says she has a wood-burning stove that is used often. Pearson said she will be using some of the ash trees that will be cut down on her property for fuel.

“I don’t do it during the summer,” she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson said restricting wood burning “isn’t a high priority for me.”

But he is willing to work on the idea. Jackson suggested holding public meetings to gauge residents’ attitude toward a bylaw.

“I can’t see people accepting a bylaw,” said Jackson.

 

Hamilton reviews wood burning restrictions

News Apr 21, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

 A proposed bylaw to regulate wood burning within the city of Hamilton is still smoldering after a Hamilton doctor urged councillors to consider regulating the practice.

Dr. Ted Mitchell, a family physician, said burning wood by homeowners causes air respiratory problems, and is similar to second-hand smoke, which Hamilton has managed to regulate in various private businesses and public areas. He told members of the April 20 Board of Health committee one hour of wood burning emits the same amount of carcinogens as 6,000 cigarettes.

“People burn work for ambience, not to save money or for heat,” said Mitchell, who is working with Environment Hamilton in a campaign to restrict wood burning.

At the very least, Mitchell wanted the city’s public health department to review the health impacts of wood burning, particularly during warmer months. He also wanted the city to do something to restrict the fire pits that are allowed in the summer.

Lynda Lukasik, of Environment Hamilton, suggested Hamilton examines Halton Region’s response to the issue. She said the municipality has launched an education campaign to curtail wood burning by residents.

Halton Region emphasized in its education material that burning wood produces “greater air pollution” by contributing to higher levels of sulphur oxide, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide, particulate matter, and other dioxins.

Wood Smoke, says opponents, can cause headaches, sore throat, runny nose, nausea, fatigue and dizziness. It has also been linked to respiratory diseases and premature death.

Hamilton already bans burning in urban areas except for cooking purposes. Outdoor burning in rural areas is allowed but with a permit.

Members of the city’s Board of Health remained uninspired to rush into restricting wood burning.

Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson said most homeowners enjoy burning wood in their homes and are not going to give it up.

Stoney Creek councillor Maria Pearson says she has a wood-burning stove that is used often. Pearson said she will be using some of the ash trees that will be cut down on her property for fuel.

“I don’t do it during the summer,” she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson said restricting wood burning “isn’t a high priority for me.”

But he is willing to work on the idea. Jackson suggested holding public meetings to gauge residents’ attitude toward a bylaw.

“I can’t see people accepting a bylaw,” said Jackson.

 

Hamilton reviews wood burning restrictions

News Apr 21, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

 A proposed bylaw to regulate wood burning within the city of Hamilton is still smoldering after a Hamilton doctor urged councillors to consider regulating the practice.

Dr. Ted Mitchell, a family physician, said burning wood by homeowners causes air respiratory problems, and is similar to second-hand smoke, which Hamilton has managed to regulate in various private businesses and public areas. He told members of the April 20 Board of Health committee one hour of wood burning emits the same amount of carcinogens as 6,000 cigarettes.

“People burn work for ambience, not to save money or for heat,” said Mitchell, who is working with Environment Hamilton in a campaign to restrict wood burning.

At the very least, Mitchell wanted the city’s public health department to review the health impacts of wood burning, particularly during warmer months. He also wanted the city to do something to restrict the fire pits that are allowed in the summer.

Lynda Lukasik, of Environment Hamilton, suggested Hamilton examines Halton Region’s response to the issue. She said the municipality has launched an education campaign to curtail wood burning by residents.

Halton Region emphasized in its education material that burning wood produces “greater air pollution” by contributing to higher levels of sulphur oxide, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide, particulate matter, and other dioxins.

Wood Smoke, says opponents, can cause headaches, sore throat, runny nose, nausea, fatigue and dizziness. It has also been linked to respiratory diseases and premature death.

Hamilton already bans burning in urban areas except for cooking purposes. Outdoor burning in rural areas is allowed but with a permit.

Members of the city’s Board of Health remained uninspired to rush into restricting wood burning.

Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson said most homeowners enjoy burning wood in their homes and are not going to give it up.

Stoney Creek councillor Maria Pearson says she has a wood-burning stove that is used often. Pearson said she will be using some of the ash trees that will be cut down on her property for fuel.

“I don’t do it during the summer,” she said.

Mountain councillor Tom Jackson said restricting wood burning “isn’t a high priority for me.”

But he is willing to work on the idea. Jackson suggested holding public meetings to gauge residents’ attitude toward a bylaw.

“I can’t see people accepting a bylaw,” said Jackson.