Hamilton issues occupancy permit for Tim Hortons Field

News Apr 16, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

 Hamilton’s Tim Horton’s Field is nearing completion about 10 months past its official deadline.

The city issued an occupancy permit for the stadium April 16 to Infrastructure Ontario that is overseeing the $145.7 million construction of the facility on the former Ivor Wynne Stadium site.

Building officials, stated a news release from the city, had inspected “hundreds” of components while conducting safety checks. The statement said delays in caulking work in the east end of the stadium is not considered a public safety issue and won’t delay the occupancy permit from being issued. The work is expected to be completed within two weeks.

Ed VanderWindt, Hamilton’s chief building officer, said city inspectors have been repeatedly in the stadium inspecting the work, waiting to issue the permit. He said the city is basically regulatory agency and it’s up to the contractor, Ontario Sports Solutions, to meet Ontario’s rigorous building code requirements.

Building officials have also reviewed the letters of assurances from all engineers and architects to make sure all the work is being done properly.

OSS had promised city officials that the stadium would be completed by June 30, 2014, but that deadline was repeatedly extended over the summer.  The city’s building officials had to issue temporary occupancy permits to allow the public to see the Hamilton Tiger-Cats’ home games.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger has called the delay “inexcusable,” while Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson said it’s “unbelievable” how the process had unfolded.

Infrastructure Ontario has withheld payments to OSS because of the delays.

Ferguson, who is also chair of the Pan Am Stadium sub-committee, said he expected the city to issue the occupancy permit this week.

He said after conducting a tour of the facility a week ago that work on the facility had progressed since the last time he saw the facility. Over the severe winter there were problems from water damage causing seals to erode.

“It’s all finished on the west side,” said Ferguson. “They are finishing on the east side. It’s a big job. They are getting close.”

City staff said the project is still not “substantially completed” according to the contract. Once it reaches that level, the stadium can be turned over to the city.

Ferguson said he expected the stadium to be substantially completed by the end of April, “based on what I saw yesterday.”

But executive vice-president for Infrastructure Ontario John McKendrick stated in an April 9 letter to the city that the project was “99 per cent” completed, which would meet the definition of “substantially completed. Yet, as Ferguson said, Infrastructure Ontario has yet to issue the documents transferring ownership of the stadium to the city.

The city is under a tight deadline since the Hamilton Police Service needs to use the stadium starting May 1 to conduct training exercises. In addition, city officials are scheduling open houses for the public to view the stadium towards the end of May.

The Pan Am Games begin in July from the 10 to 26.

 

Hamilton issues occupancy permit for Tim Hortons Field

News Apr 16, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

 Hamilton’s Tim Horton’s Field is nearing completion about 10 months past its official deadline.

The city issued an occupancy permit for the stadium April 16 to Infrastructure Ontario that is overseeing the $145.7 million construction of the facility on the former Ivor Wynne Stadium site.

Building officials, stated a news release from the city, had inspected “hundreds” of components while conducting safety checks. The statement said delays in caulking work in the east end of the stadium is not considered a public safety issue and won’t delay the occupancy permit from being issued. The work is expected to be completed within two weeks.

Ed VanderWindt, Hamilton’s chief building officer, said city inspectors have been repeatedly in the stadium inspecting the work, waiting to issue the permit. He said the city is basically regulatory agency and it’s up to the contractor, Ontario Sports Solutions, to meet Ontario’s rigorous building code requirements.

Building officials have also reviewed the letters of assurances from all engineers and architects to make sure all the work is being done properly.

OSS had promised city officials that the stadium would be completed by June 30, 2014, but that deadline was repeatedly extended over the summer.  The city’s building officials had to issue temporary occupancy permits to allow the public to see the Hamilton Tiger-Cats’ home games.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger has called the delay “inexcusable,” while Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson said it’s “unbelievable” how the process had unfolded.

Infrastructure Ontario has withheld payments to OSS because of the delays.

Ferguson, who is also chair of the Pan Am Stadium sub-committee, said he expected the city to issue the occupancy permit this week.

He said after conducting a tour of the facility a week ago that work on the facility had progressed since the last time he saw the facility. Over the severe winter there were problems from water damage causing seals to erode.

“It’s all finished on the west side,” said Ferguson. “They are finishing on the east side. It’s a big job. They are getting close.”

City staff said the project is still not “substantially completed” according to the contract. Once it reaches that level, the stadium can be turned over to the city.

Ferguson said he expected the stadium to be substantially completed by the end of April, “based on what I saw yesterday.”

But executive vice-president for Infrastructure Ontario John McKendrick stated in an April 9 letter to the city that the project was “99 per cent” completed, which would meet the definition of “substantially completed. Yet, as Ferguson said, Infrastructure Ontario has yet to issue the documents transferring ownership of the stadium to the city.

The city is under a tight deadline since the Hamilton Police Service needs to use the stadium starting May 1 to conduct training exercises. In addition, city officials are scheduling open houses for the public to view the stadium towards the end of May.

The Pan Am Games begin in July from the 10 to 26.

 

Hamilton issues occupancy permit for Tim Hortons Field

News Apr 16, 2015 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

 Hamilton’s Tim Horton’s Field is nearing completion about 10 months past its official deadline.

The city issued an occupancy permit for the stadium April 16 to Infrastructure Ontario that is overseeing the $145.7 million construction of the facility on the former Ivor Wynne Stadium site.

Building officials, stated a news release from the city, had inspected “hundreds” of components while conducting safety checks. The statement said delays in caulking work in the east end of the stadium is not considered a public safety issue and won’t delay the occupancy permit from being issued. The work is expected to be completed within two weeks.

Ed VanderWindt, Hamilton’s chief building officer, said city inspectors have been repeatedly in the stadium inspecting the work, waiting to issue the permit. He said the city is basically regulatory agency and it’s up to the contractor, Ontario Sports Solutions, to meet Ontario’s rigorous building code requirements.

Building officials have also reviewed the letters of assurances from all engineers and architects to make sure all the work is being done properly.

OSS had promised city officials that the stadium would be completed by June 30, 2014, but that deadline was repeatedly extended over the summer.  The city’s building officials had to issue temporary occupancy permits to allow the public to see the Hamilton Tiger-Cats’ home games.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger has called the delay “inexcusable,” while Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson said it’s “unbelievable” how the process had unfolded.

Infrastructure Ontario has withheld payments to OSS because of the delays.

Ferguson, who is also chair of the Pan Am Stadium sub-committee, said he expected the city to issue the occupancy permit this week.

He said after conducting a tour of the facility a week ago that work on the facility had progressed since the last time he saw the facility. Over the severe winter there were problems from water damage causing seals to erode.

“It’s all finished on the west side,” said Ferguson. “They are finishing on the east side. It’s a big job. They are getting close.”

City staff said the project is still not “substantially completed” according to the contract. Once it reaches that level, the stadium can be turned over to the city.

Ferguson said he expected the stadium to be substantially completed by the end of April, “based on what I saw yesterday.”

But executive vice-president for Infrastructure Ontario John McKendrick stated in an April 9 letter to the city that the project was “99 per cent” completed, which would meet the definition of “substantially completed. Yet, as Ferguson said, Infrastructure Ontario has yet to issue the documents transferring ownership of the stadium to the city.

The city is under a tight deadline since the Hamilton Police Service needs to use the stadium starting May 1 to conduct training exercises. In addition, city officials are scheduling open houses for the public to view the stadium towards the end of May.

The Pan Am Games begin in July from the 10 to 26.