Hamilton transit workers ratify four-year contract

News Apr 16, 2015 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Hamilton transit workers have officially accepted a new contract that will see wages increase seven per cent over four years.

Eric Tuck, president of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 107, announced on April 16 that union membership voted 86 per cent in favour of a new four-year deal with the City of Hamilton.

The agreement will provide transit riders with continued service which Tuck said should be safer and more reliable under the terms the union negotiated.

“We negotiated clear language on safe and reasonable schedules," Tuck said in a media release. "This, along with the funding commitments from city council, should start to address some of the long standing schedule problems we have been experiencing over the last 10 years.”

Tuck said the provincial government should also make good on its election promises to provide full light rapid transit funding  of $1.2 billion.

"This is critical to the health and economic well-being of our city, and the ability to meet the future transit needs of Hamilton,”  he stated.

Tuck said the new collective agreement provides a one per cent increase in the first year and a two per cent wage increase in each of the following three years, for an overall seven per cent increase.

Tuck noted that approximately one third of his membership did not cast a ballot, and said that some members were disappointed by a cap placed on physiotherapy benefits.

Hamilton transit workers ratify four-year contract

News Apr 16, 2015 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Hamilton transit workers have officially accepted a new contract that will see wages increase seven per cent over four years.

Eric Tuck, president of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 107, announced on April 16 that union membership voted 86 per cent in favour of a new four-year deal with the City of Hamilton.

The agreement will provide transit riders with continued service which Tuck said should be safer and more reliable under the terms the union negotiated.

“We negotiated clear language on safe and reasonable schedules," Tuck said in a media release. "This, along with the funding commitments from city council, should start to address some of the long standing schedule problems we have been experiencing over the last 10 years.”

Tuck said the provincial government should also make good on its election promises to provide full light rapid transit funding  of $1.2 billion.

"This is critical to the health and economic well-being of our city, and the ability to meet the future transit needs of Hamilton,”  he stated.

Tuck said the new collective agreement provides a one per cent increase in the first year and a two per cent wage increase in each of the following three years, for an overall seven per cent increase.

Tuck noted that approximately one third of his membership did not cast a ballot, and said that some members were disappointed by a cap placed on physiotherapy benefits.

Hamilton transit workers ratify four-year contract

News Apr 16, 2015 by Mike Pearson Ancaster News

Hamilton transit workers have officially accepted a new contract that will see wages increase seven per cent over four years.

Eric Tuck, president of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 107, announced on April 16 that union membership voted 86 per cent in favour of a new four-year deal with the City of Hamilton.

The agreement will provide transit riders with continued service which Tuck said should be safer and more reliable under the terms the union negotiated.

“We negotiated clear language on safe and reasonable schedules," Tuck said in a media release. "This, along with the funding commitments from city council, should start to address some of the long standing schedule problems we have been experiencing over the last 10 years.”

Tuck said the provincial government should also make good on its election promises to provide full light rapid transit funding  of $1.2 billion.

"This is critical to the health and economic well-being of our city, and the ability to meet the future transit needs of Hamilton,”  he stated.

Tuck said the new collective agreement provides a one per cent increase in the first year and a two per cent wage increase in each of the following three years, for an overall seven per cent increase.

Tuck noted that approximately one third of his membership did not cast a ballot, and said that some members were disappointed by a cap placed on physiotherapy benefits.