Hamilton school board sees ‘positive news story’ on grad rates

News Apr 16, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board says its encouraged by number of students who are obtaining their high school diploma even if their graduation rate is below the Catholic board’s and provincial average.

Peter Sovran, superintendent of student achievement, told trustees on Monday the province’s first-ever publishing of school board grad rates is a “really good news piece” because they show an upswing in the Hamilton public board’s numbers.

Among students who started in Grade 9 in the 2009/10 school year, 68 per cent graduated by the end of their fourth year, a number that jumped to 77 per cent by the fifth year.

For the Catholic board, the success rate was 79 and 84 per cent, respectively, while the provincial average was 68 and 84 per cent, according to figures released by the Ministry of Education on April 1.

Sovran said the province has changed the way grad rates are calculated by now including students who started Grade 9 at one school board but then moved to another Ontario board.

He said the board’s calculation excluded such students because it didn’t track them and would have resulted in a 79 per cent success rate by year five.

But even under the new calculation, the 77 per cent success rate is two percentage points higher than for Grade 9 students who started in the 2008/09 school year, he said.

“It’s a really positive trend and a positive news story,” Sovran said. “There’s still work to be done. There are many students who haven’t graduated and there are many who are in our system and we’re working with to make sure they do have a positive outcome.”

Ministry figures show there are 462 students who started Grade 9 in 2009/10 and are still enrolled at the board.

Trustees were told there are a variety of reasons students may stay beyond five years, including language barriers and a change in post-secondary plans that requires a course a student didn’t take.

Interim education director Pam Reinholdt said students have until 21 to graduate and it’s not unusual for those with no English skills before enrolment to take seven or eight years.

“They can (initially) do some courses that are not language heavy as part of their electives, and then as they gain a better command of the language they can actually move into compulsory courses,” she said.

Hamilton school board sees ‘positive news story’ on grad rates

News Apr 16, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board says its encouraged by number of students who are obtaining their high school diploma even if their graduation rate is below the Catholic board’s and provincial average.

Peter Sovran, superintendent of student achievement, told trustees on Monday the province’s first-ever publishing of school board grad rates is a “really good news piece” because they show an upswing in the Hamilton public board’s numbers.

Among students who started in Grade 9 in the 2009/10 school year, 68 per cent graduated by the end of their fourth year, a number that jumped to 77 per cent by the fifth year.

For the Catholic board, the success rate was 79 and 84 per cent, respectively, while the provincial average was 68 and 84 per cent, according to figures released by the Ministry of Education on April 1.

“There’s still work to be done. There are many students who haven’t graduated and there are many who are in our system and we’re working with to make sure they do have a positive outcome.”

Sovran said the province has changed the way grad rates are calculated by now including students who started Grade 9 at one school board but then moved to another Ontario board.

He said the board’s calculation excluded such students because it didn’t track them and would have resulted in a 79 per cent success rate by year five.

But even under the new calculation, the 77 per cent success rate is two percentage points higher than for Grade 9 students who started in the 2008/09 school year, he said.

“It’s a really positive trend and a positive news story,” Sovran said. “There’s still work to be done. There are many students who haven’t graduated and there are many who are in our system and we’re working with to make sure they do have a positive outcome.”

Ministry figures show there are 462 students who started Grade 9 in 2009/10 and are still enrolled at the board.

Trustees were told there are a variety of reasons students may stay beyond five years, including language barriers and a change in post-secondary plans that requires a course a student didn’t take.

Interim education director Pam Reinholdt said students have until 21 to graduate and it’s not unusual for those with no English skills before enrolment to take seven or eight years.

“They can (initially) do some courses that are not language heavy as part of their electives, and then as they gain a better command of the language they can actually move into compulsory courses,” she said.

Hamilton school board sees ‘positive news story’ on grad rates

News Apr 16, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board says its encouraged by number of students who are obtaining their high school diploma even if their graduation rate is below the Catholic board’s and provincial average.

Peter Sovran, superintendent of student achievement, told trustees on Monday the province’s first-ever publishing of school board grad rates is a “really good news piece” because they show an upswing in the Hamilton public board’s numbers.

Among students who started in Grade 9 in the 2009/10 school year, 68 per cent graduated by the end of their fourth year, a number that jumped to 77 per cent by the fifth year.

For the Catholic board, the success rate was 79 and 84 per cent, respectively, while the provincial average was 68 and 84 per cent, according to figures released by the Ministry of Education on April 1.

“There’s still work to be done. There are many students who haven’t graduated and there are many who are in our system and we’re working with to make sure they do have a positive outcome.”

Sovran said the province has changed the way grad rates are calculated by now including students who started Grade 9 at one school board but then moved to another Ontario board.

He said the board’s calculation excluded such students because it didn’t track them and would have resulted in a 79 per cent success rate by year five.

But even under the new calculation, the 77 per cent success rate is two percentage points higher than for Grade 9 students who started in the 2008/09 school year, he said.

“It’s a really positive trend and a positive news story,” Sovran said. “There’s still work to be done. There are many students who haven’t graduated and there are many who are in our system and we’re working with to make sure they do have a positive outcome.”

Ministry figures show there are 462 students who started Grade 9 in 2009/10 and are still enrolled at the board.

Trustees were told there are a variety of reasons students may stay beyond five years, including language barriers and a change in post-secondary plans that requires a course a student didn’t take.

Interim education director Pam Reinholdt said students have until 21 to graduate and it’s not unusual for those with no English skills before enrolment to take seven or eight years.

“They can (initially) do some courses that are not language heavy as part of their electives, and then as they gain a better command of the language they can actually move into compulsory courses,” she said.