Hamilton residents question Greenbelt, growth plans at sessions

News Apr 10, 2015 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Hamilton planning staff has been encouraging residents to speak their minds about how they feel about the province’s 10-year-old Greenbelt and growth plans.

Homeowners, the majority of them from the rural and suburban areas, have responded, pointing out the conflicting ideas of the planning documents and how they interact and even overlap the city’s planning rules adding to a confusing litany of requirements and regulations.

“A number of people don’t even know about the plans,” said Flamborough resident Cathy Masters, who has been involved in agricultural issues for years. “It’s complicated.”

Douglas Roung of Rockton, who turned out for the city’s sponsored open house and workshop session at Marritt Hall in Ancaster, said he was interested in learning more about the plans.

“You know, one day you may wake up and find you have a conservation line on your property,” he said.

The city held four planning sessions recently at LIUNA Station, Winona Vine Estates, Rockton Fairgrounds and Marritt Hall. Officials were asking residents to provide them with information on how to change the provincial planning documents, such as the Greenbelt Plan, the growth plan and the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

About 25 people turned out for the information session at Ancaster.  At LIUNA Station, and Winona about 30 people signed in, while at Rockton over 40 people participated in the workshop.

Some residents complained the city didn’t do enough to inform Hamilton residents, especially those people living in the rural areas, about the planning sessions.

And city officials were unable to tell some residents who owned land within the greenbelt that was looking to be developed.

“We don’t know,” said Hickey-Evans.

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is conducting a mandatory review of the documents as required when the Greenbelt and growth plan legislation was approved in 2005.  The province is holding its own series of public meetings across Ontario. Ministry officials have a meeting scheduled at the Hamilton Convention Centre for April 16 starting at 6 p.m.

City staff said residents can provide their views about the provincial planning documents to them by April 15. The public input will be incorporated into the city’s planning report to the province as well as to councillors at a future council meeting.

Masters says she hopes city officials and the province, actually take heed of the public’s views.

“You wonder if they hear what people think,” said Masters.

Senior Project Manager for Hamilton Peter De Iulio said some people who came out in Rockton said the Greenbelt legislation has not helped local farmers because of its tight restrictions.

Ontario’s Greenbelt legislation, the largest protected greenbelt in the world, encompasses all of Hamilton’s rural area bounded by Milburough Line in Flamborough, to Harrisburg Road in Ancaster, to Haldibrook Road in Glanbrook, and Westbrook Road to Hamilton’s border with Niagara. In addition, the Niagara Escarpment Plan protects the escarpment, while the tender fruit and grapes are protected within the Green Mountain Road area towards Winona. The Greenbelt is required to protect prime agricultural, rural and tender fruit and grape areas.

“Both plans are supposed to work together,” said Joanne Hickey-Evans, manager of planning policy.

The province’s growth plan was introduced to accommodate growth through intensification; curb urban sprawl, revitalize downtown cores, promote integrated transportation systems and reduce pressure on agricultural lands.

Development in greenfield areas must achieve 50 people and jobs per hectare, while downtown Hamilton has a minimum density of 150 people and jobs per hectare.

The planning documents are supposed to accommodate Hamilton’s population expansion of 778,000, while adding 350,000 jobs by 2041.

 

Hamilton residents question Greenbelt, growth plans at sessions

News Apr 10, 2015 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Hamilton planning staff has been encouraging residents to speak their minds about how they feel about the province’s 10-year-old Greenbelt and growth plans.

Homeowners, the majority of them from the rural and suburban areas, have responded, pointing out the conflicting ideas of the planning documents and how they interact and even overlap the city’s planning rules adding to a confusing litany of requirements and regulations.

“A number of people don’t even know about the plans,” said Flamborough resident Cathy Masters, who has been involved in agricultural issues for years. “It’s complicated.”

Douglas Roung of Rockton, who turned out for the city’s sponsored open house and workshop session at Marritt Hall in Ancaster, said he was interested in learning more about the plans.

“You know, one day you may wake up and find you have a conservation line on your property,” he said.

The city held four planning sessions recently at LIUNA Station, Winona Vine Estates, Rockton Fairgrounds and Marritt Hall. Officials were asking residents to provide them with information on how to change the provincial planning documents, such as the Greenbelt Plan, the growth plan and the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

About 25 people turned out for the information session at Ancaster.  At LIUNA Station, and Winona about 30 people signed in, while at Rockton over 40 people participated in the workshop.

Some residents complained the city didn’t do enough to inform Hamilton residents, especially those people living in the rural areas, about the planning sessions.

And city officials were unable to tell some residents who owned land within the greenbelt that was looking to be developed.

“We don’t know,” said Hickey-Evans.

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is conducting a mandatory review of the documents as required when the Greenbelt and growth plan legislation was approved in 2005.  The province is holding its own series of public meetings across Ontario. Ministry officials have a meeting scheduled at the Hamilton Convention Centre for April 16 starting at 6 p.m.

City staff said residents can provide their views about the provincial planning documents to them by April 15. The public input will be incorporated into the city’s planning report to the province as well as to councillors at a future council meeting.

Masters says she hopes city officials and the province, actually take heed of the public’s views.

“You wonder if they hear what people think,” said Masters.

Senior Project Manager for Hamilton Peter De Iulio said some people who came out in Rockton said the Greenbelt legislation has not helped local farmers because of its tight restrictions.

Ontario’s Greenbelt legislation, the largest protected greenbelt in the world, encompasses all of Hamilton’s rural area bounded by Milburough Line in Flamborough, to Harrisburg Road in Ancaster, to Haldibrook Road in Glanbrook, and Westbrook Road to Hamilton’s border with Niagara. In addition, the Niagara Escarpment Plan protects the escarpment, while the tender fruit and grapes are protected within the Green Mountain Road area towards Winona. The Greenbelt is required to protect prime agricultural, rural and tender fruit and grape areas.

“Both plans are supposed to work together,” said Joanne Hickey-Evans, manager of planning policy.

The province’s growth plan was introduced to accommodate growth through intensification; curb urban sprawl, revitalize downtown cores, promote integrated transportation systems and reduce pressure on agricultural lands.

Development in greenfield areas must achieve 50 people and jobs per hectare, while downtown Hamilton has a minimum density of 150 people and jobs per hectare.

The planning documents are supposed to accommodate Hamilton’s population expansion of 778,000, while adding 350,000 jobs by 2041.

 

Hamilton residents question Greenbelt, growth plans at sessions

News Apr 10, 2015 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

Hamilton planning staff has been encouraging residents to speak their minds about how they feel about the province’s 10-year-old Greenbelt and growth plans.

Homeowners, the majority of them from the rural and suburban areas, have responded, pointing out the conflicting ideas of the planning documents and how they interact and even overlap the city’s planning rules adding to a confusing litany of requirements and regulations.

“A number of people don’t even know about the plans,” said Flamborough resident Cathy Masters, who has been involved in agricultural issues for years. “It’s complicated.”

Douglas Roung of Rockton, who turned out for the city’s sponsored open house and workshop session at Marritt Hall in Ancaster, said he was interested in learning more about the plans.

“You know, one day you may wake up and find you have a conservation line on your property,” he said.

The city held four planning sessions recently at LIUNA Station, Winona Vine Estates, Rockton Fairgrounds and Marritt Hall. Officials were asking residents to provide them with information on how to change the provincial planning documents, such as the Greenbelt Plan, the growth plan and the Niagara Escarpment Plan.

About 25 people turned out for the information session at Ancaster.  At LIUNA Station, and Winona about 30 people signed in, while at Rockton over 40 people participated in the workshop.

Some residents complained the city didn’t do enough to inform Hamilton residents, especially those people living in the rural areas, about the planning sessions.

And city officials were unable to tell some residents who owned land within the greenbelt that was looking to be developed.

“We don’t know,” said Hickey-Evans.

The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing is conducting a mandatory review of the documents as required when the Greenbelt and growth plan legislation was approved in 2005.  The province is holding its own series of public meetings across Ontario. Ministry officials have a meeting scheduled at the Hamilton Convention Centre for April 16 starting at 6 p.m.

City staff said residents can provide their views about the provincial planning documents to them by April 15. The public input will be incorporated into the city’s planning report to the province as well as to councillors at a future council meeting.

Masters says she hopes city officials and the province, actually take heed of the public’s views.

“You wonder if they hear what people think,” said Masters.

Senior Project Manager for Hamilton Peter De Iulio said some people who came out in Rockton said the Greenbelt legislation has not helped local farmers because of its tight restrictions.

Ontario’s Greenbelt legislation, the largest protected greenbelt in the world, encompasses all of Hamilton’s rural area bounded by Milburough Line in Flamborough, to Harrisburg Road in Ancaster, to Haldibrook Road in Glanbrook, and Westbrook Road to Hamilton’s border with Niagara. In addition, the Niagara Escarpment Plan protects the escarpment, while the tender fruit and grapes are protected within the Green Mountain Road area towards Winona. The Greenbelt is required to protect prime agricultural, rural and tender fruit and grape areas.

“Both plans are supposed to work together,” said Joanne Hickey-Evans, manager of planning policy.

The province’s growth plan was introduced to accommodate growth through intensification; curb urban sprawl, revitalize downtown cores, promote integrated transportation systems and reduce pressure on agricultural lands.

Development in greenfield areas must achieve 50 people and jobs per hectare, while downtown Hamilton has a minimum density of 150 people and jobs per hectare.

The planning documents are supposed to accommodate Hamilton’s population expansion of 778,000, while adding 350,000 jobs by 2041.