Mt. Albion outdoor ed centre eyed for sale

News Apr 09, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

The Hamilton Conservation Authority wants to know if anyone’s interested in renting or buying a former residence at Mount Albion Conservation Area that once served as an outdoor education centre.

Chief administrative officer Chris Firth-Eagland said the home, which sits on a 1.2-hectare yard by the southeast corner of Stone Church Road East and Arbour Road, has been vacant for a year and a half because the authority has no use for it.

Faced with a choice of spending $4,000 on annual upkeep or $20,000 to demolish it, staff hopes someone might propose another use that is compatible with the adjoining conservation area, he said.

“Perhaps someone would come up with an idea we didn’t consider,” Firth-Eagland told authority directors, who approved issuing a call for proposals.

While supporting the plan, Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson said the authority could first rezone the property to make it more marketable, suggesting parking for a nearby collision-repair business as one potential use.

He said the city took that approach when it bought the former Grange public school site in Ancaster, rezoning half of it for housing and selling that portion for more than it paid for the entire property.

“There’s no risk to the purchaser then,” Ferguson said.

Director Duke O’Sullivan urged staff to consider renting or selling more of the adjoining conservation property, a 7.5-hectare swath cut off from the much larger main area to the south by Stone Church Road.

“I don’t think we should limit it” to the yard, he said. “The funds we get from the sale of this property would be in the fund to buy other conservation properties, of which there are a lot out there that would more fit our goals.”

Firth-Eagland said directors will have the ultimate say on any proposal, but the property is designated as park and open space by the Niagara Escarpment Plan and zoned conservation hazard land by the city.

That makes the home a legal, non-conforming use, he said, and any change in use will require amendments from the city and escarpment commission and be the responsibility of any interested party.

Note: This story has been updated from an original version to correct the property's size.

Mt. Albion outdoor ed centre eyed for sale

News Apr 09, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

The Hamilton Conservation Authority wants to know if anyone’s interested in renting or buying a former residence at Mount Albion Conservation Area that once served as an outdoor education centre.

Chief administrative officer Chris Firth-Eagland said the home, which sits on a 1.2-hectare yard by the southeast corner of Stone Church Road East and Arbour Road, has been vacant for a year and a half because the authority has no use for it.

Faced with a choice of spending $4,000 on annual upkeep or $20,000 to demolish it, staff hopes someone might propose another use that is compatible with the adjoining conservation area, he said.

“Perhaps someone would come up with an idea we didn’t consider,” Firth-Eagland told authority directors, who approved issuing a call for proposals.

"The funds we get from the sale of this property would be in the fund to buy other conservation properties."

While supporting the plan, Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson said the authority could first rezone the property to make it more marketable, suggesting parking for a nearby collision-repair business as one potential use.

He said the city took that approach when it bought the former Grange public school site in Ancaster, rezoning half of it for housing and selling that portion for more than it paid for the entire property.

“There’s no risk to the purchaser then,” Ferguson said.

Director Duke O’Sullivan urged staff to consider renting or selling more of the adjoining conservation property, a 7.5-hectare swath cut off from the much larger main area to the south by Stone Church Road.

“I don’t think we should limit it” to the yard, he said. “The funds we get from the sale of this property would be in the fund to buy other conservation properties, of which there are a lot out there that would more fit our goals.”

Firth-Eagland said directors will have the ultimate say on any proposal, but the property is designated as park and open space by the Niagara Escarpment Plan and zoned conservation hazard land by the city.

That makes the home a legal, non-conforming use, he said, and any change in use will require amendments from the city and escarpment commission and be the responsibility of any interested party.

Note: This story has been updated from an original version to correct the property's size.

Mt. Albion outdoor ed centre eyed for sale

News Apr 09, 2015 by Richard Leitner Hamilton Mountain News

The Hamilton Conservation Authority wants to know if anyone’s interested in renting or buying a former residence at Mount Albion Conservation Area that once served as an outdoor education centre.

Chief administrative officer Chris Firth-Eagland said the home, which sits on a 1.2-hectare yard by the southeast corner of Stone Church Road East and Arbour Road, has been vacant for a year and a half because the authority has no use for it.

Faced with a choice of spending $4,000 on annual upkeep or $20,000 to demolish it, staff hopes someone might propose another use that is compatible with the adjoining conservation area, he said.

“Perhaps someone would come up with an idea we didn’t consider,” Firth-Eagland told authority directors, who approved issuing a call for proposals.

"The funds we get from the sale of this property would be in the fund to buy other conservation properties."

While supporting the plan, Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson said the authority could first rezone the property to make it more marketable, suggesting parking for a nearby collision-repair business as one potential use.

He said the city took that approach when it bought the former Grange public school site in Ancaster, rezoning half of it for housing and selling that portion for more than it paid for the entire property.

“There’s no risk to the purchaser then,” Ferguson said.

Director Duke O’Sullivan urged staff to consider renting or selling more of the adjoining conservation property, a 7.5-hectare swath cut off from the much larger main area to the south by Stone Church Road.

“I don’t think we should limit it” to the yard, he said. “The funds we get from the sale of this property would be in the fund to buy other conservation properties, of which there are a lot out there that would more fit our goals.”

Firth-Eagland said directors will have the ultimate say on any proposal, but the property is designated as park and open space by the Niagara Escarpment Plan and zoned conservation hazard land by the city.

That makes the home a legal, non-conforming use, he said, and any change in use will require amendments from the city and escarpment commission and be the responsibility of any interested party.

Note: This story has been updated from an original version to correct the property's size.